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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (47 total).

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. 2020. How racism can affect child development. Cambridge, MA: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 1 p.

Annotation: This infographic illustrates how children's stress response systems react to systemic racism and everyday discrimination to negatively affect their learning, behavior and physical and mental health.

Contact: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: developingchild@harvard.edu Web Site: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain, Child development, Racial factors, Racism, Social factors

National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases. 2016–. Zika virus (upd.). Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: This website provides information and resources for health care professionals, pregnant women, and others about zika virus disease. Contents include data; information for specific population groups; communication resources such as videos, fact sheets, posters, and infographics; and scientific resources including links to information collections by publisher, emergency bulletins, links to U.S. and international governmental resources, and a biomedical literature search tool. Topics include symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment; prevention; transmission and risks; areas with zika; and vector surveillance and control.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain diseases, Communicable disease control, Congenital abnormalities, Consumer education materials, Diagnosis, Disease prevention, Disease transmission, Population surveillance, Pregnant women, Public awareness materials, Research, Resource materials, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, Therapeutics, Virus diseases

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2014-. Early Brain and Child Development (EBCD) education and training modules. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, multiple items.

Annotation: These five modules and accompanying guides for primary care health professionals provide information and resources on early brain development, toxic stress, adverse childhood experiences, supporting parents and cultivating community relationships, and advocacy. Each module includes a PowerPoint presentation with presenter notes and a guide with tips for presenting the content. Each module also contains activities, video clips, prompting questions, and case studies to encourage active participation.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Brain, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Mental health, Parent support services, Primary care, Psychological development, Relationships, Stress, Training, Vulnerability

Spearman RC, Stamm BH, Tivis R, Aubrey DL, Kelchner C. 2014. Traumatic brain injury in Idaho: A longitudinal analysis of needs and resource assessment data (2001–2011). Meridian, ID: Idaho Traumatic Brain Injury Virtual Program Center, 38 pp.

Annotation: This report is a cumulative analysis of seven traumatic brain injury (TBI) needs and resource assessments conducted between 2001 and 2011 in Idaho. Contents include the study methodology and survey results for individuals with TBI, family members, and service agencies. Topics include changes in reported needs across time, changes in services and supports across time, and the quality of the match between reported needs and available support. Implications for the role of telehealth are also discussed. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Idaho Traumatic Brain Injury Virtual Program Center, Idaho State University, Institute of Rural Health, Meridian Health Sciences, 1311 East Central Drive, Meridian, ID 83642, Telephone: (208) 373-1773 Fax: (208) 373-1777 E-mail: tbi@isu.edu Web Site: https://www.caregiver.org/idaho-traumatic-brain-injury-virtual-program-center Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain injuries, Family support services, Idaho, Needs assessment, State MCH programs, Telemedicine, Trauma, Trends

Wehman P. 2013. Life beyond the classroom: Transition strategies for young people with disabilities. (5th ed.). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing, 576 pp.

Annotation: This book is geared toward helping students, instructors, and professionals in rehabilitation programs define, plan, facilitate, and support transition for young people with disabilities into adulthood and independent living. The book is divided into three major sections: (1) defining and planning transition, (2) facilitating and supporting transition, and (3) designing and implementing individualized transition plans. Topics also include secondary school restructuring, college and other postsecondary alternatives, assistive technology to enhance transition and work, and recent legislative acts in the field. Each chapter contains a list of learning objectives, a conclusion, and study questions. Figures and tables throughout the book provide statistical data, sample forms and checklists, and additional information to illustrate needs and capabilities. Appendices are provided with selected chapters. References and an index conclude the book

Contact: Brookes Publishing, P.O. Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21285-0624, Telephone: (800) 638-3775 Secondary Telephone: (410) 337-9580 Fax: (410) 337-8539 E-mail: custserv@brookespublishing.com Web Site: http://www.brookespublishing.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-55766-476-5.

Keywords: Adolescents with developmental disabilities, Assessment, Assistive devices, Brain injuries, Careers, Children with special health care needs, Cognition disorders, College bound students, College students, Emotional instability, Families, High school students, Parent participation, Postsecondary education, School to work transitions, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Vocational education

Hood DR, Harwick R. 2013. Technical report: Development of the TBI transition toolkit. Eugene, OR: Western Oregon University, Teaching Research Institute, Center on Brain Injury Research and Training, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the process of identifying the evidence base for transition strategies and developing and piloting specific tools in a toolkit designed for educators and others who will help students with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) develop transition plans as part of their individualized education program (IEP). The report describes the process of developing the toolkit from start to finish, including the training of users and evaluation of the final product. Most of the tools discussed in the report are informal assessments that address the particular needs of students who have challenges in executive function, memory, self-awareness, and motivation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center on Brain Injury Research and Training, Western Oregon University, Teaching Research Institute, 99 West 10th Avenue, Suite 370, Eugene, OR 97401, Telephone: (541) 346-0593 E-mail: thomasc@wou.edu Web Site: http://www.cbirt.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain injuries, Evidence, Reports, School health, Special education, Students, Transition planning

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013. Mental health surveillance among children--United States, 2005-2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 62(Suppl. 2):1-35,

Annotation: This report describes federal surveillance systems, surveys, and other information systems that measure prevalence of mental disorders and indicators of mental health among children in the United States and highlights selected national prevalence estimates. Topics include mental disorders (attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder, autism spectrum disorders, mood and anxiety disorders), substance use disorders and substance use, and tic disorders (Tourette syndrome). Selected indicators of mental health, including mentally unhealthy days and suicide, are also assessed. Availability of state-based estimates is noted in the surveillance descriptions and tables.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain diseases, Children, Data, Information systems, Mental disorders, Mental health, Population surveillance, Prevalence, Substance use, Surveys

Children's Safety Network. 2013. Preventing and treating traumatic brain injury in young children. Newton, MA: Children's Safety Network,

Annotation: This collaborative webinar between the Children's Safety Network and the HRSA Traumatic Brain Injury Technical Assistance Center (TBI TAC) provides an overview of the burden of TBI among young children ages, 0-4, the work of the HRSA Traumatic Brain Injury Program, and efforts to mitigate the impact of TBI on this population. It discusses the Utah Medical Home Portal, highlights from the state's training on TBI in 0-4 year olds, and research in the area.

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain damage, Brain injuries, Child safety, Children with special health care needs, Data, Infants, Injury prevention, Trauma, Utah, Young children

Children's Safety Network. 2013. Traumatic brain injury (TBI): Resource guide 2013. Newton, MA: Children's Safety Network, 14 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide provides information to help state maternal and child health and injury and violence prevention programs respond to the needs of infants, adolescents, and adults who are at risk for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Topics include fall prevention, motor vehicle safety, bicycle safety, sports safety, and abuse prevention. It also contains links to data, research studies, information on policy and legislation, prevention strategies, tools for program planning, and a list of national organizations that address TBI.

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bicycle injuries, Brain damage, Brain injuries, Child safety, Children, Falls, Infants, Injury prevention, Motor vehicle safety, Physical abuse, Sports injuries, Violence prevention

Children's Safety Network. 2013. Sports-related concussions in children and adolescents: Fact sheets. Newton, MA: Children's Safety Network, 6 items.

Annotation: This web site contains fact sheets to provide public health professionals with a summary of information on a traumatic brain injury (TBI) that affects many children and adolescents, Topics include an overview of sports-related concussions, strategies for preventing sports-related concussions and subsequent injury, legislation on sports-related concussions, the role of public health professionals in prevention, information and resources on TBI, as well as references and suggested readings.

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain damage, Brain injuries, Injury prevention, Public health education, Resources for professionals, Sports injuries

National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment. 2013. Get a heads up on concussion: Heads up to parents. Atlanta, GA: CDC Foundation, 1 v.

Annotation: This app and website are tools to help those who play a role in keeping children and adolescents safe from concussion and other serious brain injuries. The resources were created by the CDC Foundation with support from the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment. The app helps parents select helmets and provides safety information and tips on spotting concussions. The website offers a variety of materials, including videos, fact sheets, and training courses.

Contact: CDC Foundation, 600 Peachtree Street, N.E., Suite 1000, Atanta, GA 30308, Telephone: (404) 653-0790 Secondary Telephone: (888) 880-4CDC Fax: (404) 653-0330 Web Site: http;//www.cdcfoundation.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain injuries, Head injuries, Injury prevention, Mobile applications, Multimedia, Sports equipment, Sports injuries

Graham R, Rivara FP, Ford MA, Spicer CM, eds.; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Sports-Related Concussions in Youth and National Research Council. 2013. Sports-related concussions in youth: Improving the science, changing the culture. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 340 pp., brief (4 pp.)

Annotation: This report provides information about the science of sports-related concussion in children and adolescents. Topics include an overview of normal brain development; considerations pertaining to the recognition, diagnosis, and acute management of concussions; treatment and management of individuals with concussion symptoms that persist beyond the typical 1- to 2-week recovery period; issues surrounding repetitive head impacts that do not produce the signs and symptoms of a concussion, as well as multiple concussions; interventions that may reduce the risk of sports-related concussions; and legislation directed toward concussion education and athlete protection. A brief is also available.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu $78.00 plus shipping and handling; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-29637-3.

Keywords: Adolescents, Brain injuries, Children, Legislation, Patient care management, Research, Risk management, Sports injuries

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2013. Healthy People 2020 grant program for chapters: Early brain and child development–Goals, outcomes, and future plans. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 27 pp.

Annotation: This compendium summarizes pilot programs on early brain and child development that were funded by the American Academy of Pediatric's (AAP's) Healthy People 2020 Grant Program for Chapters. The programs addressed early screening improvement (Alabama), increasing the proportion of children ready for school (District of Columbia), outreach to the Somali community (Minnesota), and linking pediatricians to childcare referral agencies (New York). Contents also include information on the grant program's selection criteria, topical summaries by state, and related AAP initiatives and resources.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain, Community based services, Early childhood development, Grants, Healthy People 2020, Pediatric care, Prevention programs, Professional societies

Hayes S, Sublette P, Harwick R, Hood D. 2012. Transition toolkit for students with traumatic brain injury. Eugene, OR: Western Oregon University, Teaching Research Institute, Center on Brain Injury Research and Training, 66 pp.

Annotation: This manual presents transition strategies that address the challenges that children, families, educators, and community providers face when working with students who have sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI). The recommended strategies and transition tools are based on research findings that have shown these practices to be effective in working with students with a range of disabilities. Most of the tools are informal assessments that address the particular needs of students who have challenges in executive function, memory, self-awareness, and motivation. Self-monitoring and self-evaluation forms for students are included in the manual. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center on Brain Injury Research and Training, Western Oregon University, Teaching Research Institute, 99 West 10th Avenue, Suite 370, Eugene, OR 97401, Telephone: (541) 346-0593 E-mail: thomasc@wou.edu Web Site: http://www.cbirt.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Brain injuries, Children with special health care needs, School health, Special education, Students, Transition planning

Harvard Center on the Developing Child and National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. [2011]. Three core concepts in early development. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Center on the Developing Child,

Annotation: This website presents a three-part video series that depicts how advances in neuroscience, molecular biology, and genomics have improved our understanding of the way early experiences are built into the body and the brain. The three videos are (1) Experiences Build Brain Architecture, (2) Serve & Return Interaction Shapes Brain Circuitry, and (3) Toxic Stress Derails Healthy Development. The website also provides links to related resources.

Contact: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: developingchild@harvard.edu Web Site: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain, Child health, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Genomics, Infant development, Infant health, Research, Stress, Young children

KidsHealth. 2011. Abusive head trauma (shaken baby syndrome). [Jacksonville, FL]: Nemours Foundation,

Annotation: This resource presents information for parents about abusive head trauma (AHT)/inflicted traumatic brain injury -- also called shaken baby/shaken impact syndrome -- a form of inflicted head trauma. Topics include how these injuries happen, what are the effects, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, the child's development and education, and preventing AHT.

Contact: KidsHealth, Nemours, 10140 Centurion Parkway, Jacksonville, FL 32256, Telephone: (904) 697-4100 Fax: (904) 697-4220 E-mail: comments@KidsHealth.org Web Site: http://kidshealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain damage, Brain injuries, Child abuse, Head injuries, Infant care, Infant health, Injury prevention, Newborn infants, Physical abuse, Shaken baby syndrome

National Institute of Mental Health. 2011. The teen brain: Still under construction. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Mental Health, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brochure describes changes in the brain that occur during the adolescent years and the significance of this stage of development. It describes how such changes may help to explain why mortality rates rise between early and late adolescence, despite the fact that young people of this age are close to the lifelong peak of their physical health and mental capacity. The brochure discusses changes in the visible brain, including the quantity of gray matter, and describes how these changes might help to explain the increase in risky behavior such as binge drinking among adolescents. It goes on to explain why these research findings present an opportunity to intervene early in mental illnesses that have their onset at this age.

Contact: National Institute of Mental Health, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20892-9663, Telephone: (866) 615-6464 Secondary Telephone: (301) 443-8431 Fax: (301) 443-4279 E-mail: nimhinfo@nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nimh.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescent mental health, Brain, Research, Risk factors

Maryland Traumatic Brain Injury Partnership Implementation Project. [2009]. What military service members should know about brain injury. [Catonsville, MD: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Mental Health Administration], 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for military service members provides information about brain injury. Topics include signs and symptoms that can indicate a possible brain injury and organizational resources in Maryland and nationwide. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maryland Department of Health, Behavioral Health Administration, Spring Grove Hospital Complex, Dix, Mitchell and Vocational Rehabilitation Buildings, 55 Wade Street, Catonsville, MD 21228, Telephone: (410) 402-8300 Secondary Telephone: (410) 402-8600 Web Site: http://bha.dhmh.maryland.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Family support, Military, Traumatic brain injury

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University and the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts. 2009. The brain architecture game. Cambridge, MA: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 1 item.

Annotation: This tabletop board game experience was designed to engage policymakers, community and business leaders, health and education service providers, and government officials in understanding the science of early brain development—what promotes it, what derails it, and what are the consequences for society. It is available in ready-made and do-it-yourself versions, the latter available in English, Spanish, and Portuguese. A remote version that can be played using videoconferencing and screen-sharing in groups is available.

Contact: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: developingchild@harvard.edu Web Site: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu $99.

Keywords: Brain, Early childhood development, Educational materials, Games, Infant development, Interactive media

National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. 2007. The timing and quality of early experiences combine to shape brain architecture. Cambridge, MA: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 9 pp. (Working paper no. 5)

Annotation: This paper discusses the establishment of brain architecture early in life and the importance of taking advantage of early opportunities in the developmental building process. The paper presents the issue and discusses what science tells us and popular misrepresentations of science, the science-policy gap, and implications for policy and programs.

Contact: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: info@developingchild.net Web Site: http://www.developingchild.net Available from the website.

Keywords: , Brain, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Early intervention, Early intervention programs, High risk children, Prevention, Programs, Public policy, School readiness, School-age children, Young children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.