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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 6 (6 total).

National Child Welfare Association. n.d.. Posters. New York, NY: National Child Welfare Association, 5 items.

Osterman MJK, Martin JA, Menacker F. 2009. Expanded health data from the new birth certificate, 2006. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 24 pp. (National vital statistics reports; v. 58, no. 5)

Annotation: This report presents 2006 data on new checkbox items exclusive to the 2003 U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth. Information is shown for checkboxes in the following categories: (1) risk factors in the pregnancy, (2) obstetric procedures, (3) characteristics of labor and delivery, (4) method of delivery, (5) abnormal conditions of the newborn, and (6) congenital abnormalities of the newborn. Methods, results, and a discussion are presented.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Birth certificates, Childbirth, Congenital abnormalities, Newborn infants, Pregnancy, Risk factors, Statistical data

Schoendorf KC, Parker JD, Batkhan LZ, Kiely JL. 1993. Comparability of the birth certificate and 1988 Maternal and Infant Health Survey. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 19 pp. (Vital and health statistics: Series 2, Data evaluation and methods research; no. 116)

Annotation: This report compares responses to the 1988 National Maternal and Infant Health Survey (NMIHS) maternal questionnaire to similar items from the birth certificate, including demographic factors and items pertaining to the current and past pregnancies. This comparison was of interest because information from birth certificates is widely utilized in the U.S. In 1985, survey data from the 1980 National Natality Survey (NNS) was compared with corresponding birth certificate data for a sample of births that occurred in the U.S. The maternal survey portion of the NNS included only married mothers. The 1988 NMIHS allows for the assessment of birth certificate data for a broader cross-section of the population than the NNS allowed.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS (PHS) 93-1390.

Keywords: Birth certificates, Health statistics, Infants, Mothers

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1945. Is your child's birth recorded?. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 4 pp. (Children's Bureau, Dodger no. 3)

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1919. An outline for a birth-registration test. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 7 pp. (Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau); no. 54; Miscellaneous series; no. 12)

Annotation: This monograph describes the importance of registering a child's birth in the public archives of the town or city or county in which the child is born. It offers a step-by-step outline for conducting a house-to-house investigation of birth registration, for use by organizations interested in undertaking a birth-registration canvass. Suggestions on how to use the results of the birth-registration canvass are also provided, including using mass meetings to promote the value of birth registration and to present statistics from the canvass; contacting doctors and midwives to urge them to report all births; and using newspaper publicity to arouse public interest in the issue. A publication of the U.S. Department of Labor Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Birth certificates, Guidelines, Records, United States

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1914. Birth registration: An aid in protecting the lives and rights of children. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 13 pp. (Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau); no. 2; Monograph no. 1; 3rd ed.)

Annotation: This monograph presents the case for birth registration, citing the importance of birth records in helping to reduce infant mortality, prevent newborn blindness, aid visiting nurse services, implement compulsory school attendance and child labor laws, and protect personal and property rights. The monograph provides an analysis of the adequacy of birth registration laws by state, and urges the adoption of birth registration laws based on a model state law for the registration of births and deaths drafted by a joint committee with representation from the American Medical Association, the American Public Health Association, the American Bar Association, the Bureau of the Census and the Children's Bureau. A publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Google Books, Web Site: http://www.books.google.com

Keywords: Birth certificates, Child welfare, Infant mortality, Recordkeeping, Reports, State legislation

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.