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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (52 total).

Findlay S. 2016. Paid family and medical leave. Bethesda, MD: Health Affairs, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines issues related to paid family or medical leave including laws governing employee benefits. Contents include characteristics of paid family and medical leave laws in California, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island. Topics include maximum and minimum length of paid leave, employee eligibility, benefit amount, waiting period, and funding mechanism. Opportunities to finance paid family and medical leave for all working people in the United States are also discussed. Links to related resources are provided.

Contact: Health Affairs, Project HOPE: The People-to-People Foundation, 7500 Old Georgetown Road, Suite 600, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 656-7401 Fax: (301) 654-2854 Web Site: http://www.healthaffairs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Employee benefits, Family leave, Financing, Legislation, Work family issues

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health. 2014-. Supporting nursing moms at work: Employer solutions. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health,

Annotation: This resource provides businesses with cost-effective tips and solutions for any industry setting to support women who are breastfeeding. Users can search by industry or by solutions to find creative options for space and time, as well as options for supporting women in large companies and small businesses. Topics include room amenities, breast pumps, options for handling expressed milk, education and professional support, promoting services to employees, and privacy. Videos are included.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 712E, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (800) 690-7650 Fax: (202) 205-2631 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Business, Employee benefits, Employer initiatives, Multimedia, Parent support programs, Policy development, Working mothers

Tebb KP, Sedlander E, Pica G, Diaz A, Peake K, Brindis CD. 2014. Protecting adolescent confidentiality under health care reform: The special case of explanation of benefits (EOBs). San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, 38 pp. (EOB policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief examines the extent to which explanations of benefits (EOBs) have the potential to threaten confidentiality for adolescents and young adults, the benefits and limitations of various strategies, as well as other potential policy or programmatic solutions. Topics include tension between billing transparency and client confidentiality; EOB suppression (opting in versus opting out); enforcement, operations, and evaluation of policy changes; and engaging multiple stakeholders, especially the insurance industry.

Contact: University of California, San Francisco, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143-0410, Telephone: (415) 476-5255 Web Site: http://healthpolicy.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Confidentiality, Employee benefits, Health care reform, Health insuring organizations, Policy development

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2014. VA spina bifida program: Outreach to key stakeholders and written guidance for claims audit follow-up activities needed. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report presenting findings from an evaluation of the administration of spina bifida health care benefits for children of servicemembers and veterans by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs' Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Topics include the extent to which VHA conducts outreach about available benefits, what is known about available processed health care claims, and what oversight VHA conducts of the claims process. Recommendations for executive action are included.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-14-564.

Keywords: Access to health care, Administration, Children with special health care needs, Employee benefits, Federal programs, Health care utilization, Military, Outreach, Spina bifida, Utilization review

National Partnership for Women and Families. 2014. Guide to the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA): Questions and answers (7th ed.). Washington, DC: National Partnership for Women and Families, 36 pp.

Annotation: This guide explains the provisions of the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and how the FMLA protects jobs and health insurance. Requirements, remediation, and other leave laws and protections are discussed. The guide is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Partnership for Women and Families, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2600 Fax: (202) 986-2539 E-mail: info@nationalpartnership.org Web Site: http://www.nationalpartnership.org/site/PageServer Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Employee benefits, Family leave, Legislation, Paternal leave, Public policy, Spanish language materials, Work family issues

Abt Associates and the National Academy for State Health Policy. 2014. Peer-to-peer technical assistance for state Title V maternal and child health programs on implementation of the Affordable Care Act: Toolkit. Bethesda, MD: Abt Associates; Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 35 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to assist state maternal and child health and children with special health care needs program staff in implementing the Affordable Care Act. Topics include eligibility, enrollment, and retention; design of benefits and coverage; and design and support for development of systems of care. Contents include information about potential roles for Title V program staff, questions to consider, action steps, state examples, and resource descriptions.

Contact: Abt Associates Inc., 4800 Montgomery Lane, Suite 600, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 913-0500 Fax: (301) 652-3618 Web Site: http://www.abtassociates.com/index.cfm

Keywords: Eligibility, Employee benefits, Enrollment, Health care reform, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Retention, State MCH programs, Systems development

Smith K, Schaefer A. 2012. Who cares for the sick kids?: Parents' access to paid time to care for a sick child. Durham, NC: Carsey Institute, 5 pp. (Issue brief no. 51)

Annotation: This brief analyzes employed parents’ access to five or more paid sick days annually to care for a sick child. Using data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce collected by the Families and Work Institute, the authors analyze differences in access between employed mothers and fathers by demographic and work-related characteristics. They report on the percentage of employed parents lacking access to paid sick days for care of children; the differences in reported work satisfaction based on the availability of leave; and the differences in the amount of work mothers and fathers report missing to care for a sick child. Figures and tables show who is responsible for the sick child among married employees the percentage of employed parents who lack access to different kinds of care; and the percentage of workers lacking access to leave based on select characteristics such as education, income level.

Contact: Carsey Institute, University of New Hampshire, 73 Main Street, Huddleston Hall G05B, Durham, NH 03824, Telephone: (603) 862-2821 Fax: (603) 862-3878 Web Site: http://www.carseyinstitute.unh.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Employee benefits, Family leave, National surveys, Statistics, Work family issues

McManus P. 2012. A comparative review of essential health benefits pertinent to children in large federal, state, and small group health insurance plans: Implications for selecting state benchmark plans. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 44 pp.

Annotation: This report examines essential health benefits (EHBs) for children required by the Affordable Care Act and coverage in federal and state benchmark plans. The report compares federal and state employee and small group insurance plans, as well as policies in separate Children's Health Insurance Programs (CHIPs) and Medicaid and Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) programs. The report also outlines the plans' strengths and weaknesses by EHB category, including pediatric preventive, diagnostic, and restorative oral health services.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Benchmarking, Children, Cost-sharing, Employee benefits, Federal health insurance programs, Health care reform, Policy analysis, Special health care needs, State health insurance programs

The Arc of the United States. 2012. The Affordable Care Act: What disability advocates need to know. Washington, DC: The Arc of the United States, 15 pp. (National Policy Matters)

Annotation: This paper outlines the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) to help the disability community to better understand the law and the many benefits it can provide to people with disabilities and help to move states forward with implementation. Topics include how the PPACA expands health insurance coverage in both the private and public sectors, expands essential benefits, impacts Medicaid, expands long-term services and support, and emphasizes prevention. It also discusses provisions important to people with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities.

Contact: Arc of the United States, 1660 L Street, N.W., Suite 301, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (800) 433-5255 Secondary Telephone: (202) 534-3700 Fax: (202) 783-8250 E-mail: info@thearc.org Web Site: http://www.thearc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Disabilities, Disability benefits, Expanded eligibility, Health care reform, Health insurance, Medicaid, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

National Maternal and Child Oral Health Policy Center. 2011. Exchanges and dental coverage: Building on an employer base. Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Policy Center, 4 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief provides an overview of private dental insurance coverage, who has coverage and how they obtain it, and the possible impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on employer-sponsored dental benefits. Topics addressed include employer insurance purchasing patterns, state exchanges, and coverage for children and families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Child health, Children, Employee benefits, Employer initiatives, Federal legislation, Financing, Health insurance, Oral health, Public policy, State initiatives

Campbell KP, ed. 2010–. Investing in maternal and child health: An employer's toolkit (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 304 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit outlines opportunities that employers have to improve the health of children and adolescents (from birth to age 21) and women (preconception, pregnant, and postpartum periods). Topics include health benefit design, beneficiary education and engagement, and health promotion programs. Recommendations related to minimum dental benefits, cost-sharing arrangements; and other information pertinent to plan design and administration are provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Children, Cost effectiveness, Employee benefits, Infant, Multimedia, Oral health, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Women's health, Workplace health promotion

Parisi L, Bruno R. 2010. Dental and mental health benefit: Improvements in CHIPRA. Washington, DC: Families USA, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes provisions in the Children’s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009, explains what states must do to comply with the law, and discusses the options that states have to expand access to oral health and mental health care for children from families with low incomes. Topics include mandatory and optional dental benefits, optional wraparound coverage, quality and access to oral health care, and mental health parity. Action steps for states are included.

Contact: Families USA, 1225 New York Avenue, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 628-3030 Fax: (202) 347-2417 E-mail: info@familiesusa.org Web Site: http://www.familiesusa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Benefits, Child health, Children, Children's Health Insurance Program, Dental care, Federal legislation, Mental health services, Oral health, Quality assurance, State programs

Sothermel S, Reagin Ford A. 2010. Investing in maternal and child health: An employer cost-savings calculator. Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 19 pp.

Annotation: This technical implementation brief describes a tool that calculates the financial value of preventive health benefits for women of child-bearing age and children. In this brief, a simulated business case study is used to describe how an employer might use the calculator to analyze the cost-savings impact that implementing preventive benefits may have on direct health care costs as well as on indirect health and productivity costs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Business, Case studies, Child health, Costs, Employee benefits, Health care reform, Health care systems, Models, Preventive health services, Women's health

Singh S, Darroch JE, Ashford JE, Vlassoff M. 2009. Adding it up: The costs and benefits of investing in family planning and maternal and newborn health. New York, NY: Alan Guttmacher Institute, 40 pp.

Annotation: This report is intended to guide decision-makers and resource allocators at all levels -- local and national government, bilateral and multilateral donors, and nongovernmental organizations -- in making investments that would reap the greatest returns for individuals and societies. It presents analyses on the costs and benefits of investing in two key components of sexual and reproductive health care: family planning and maternal and newborn health services.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Benefits, Contraception use, Costs, Diagnosis, Health services, International health, Maternal health, Prevention, Public policy, Reproductive health, Resource allocation, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

Kraczkowsky K, Reagin A, Sherrets D. 2009. An employer's guide to child and adolescent mental health: Recommendations for the workplace, health plans, and employee assistance programs. Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 39 pp.

Annotation: This monograph examines the impact of child and adolescent behavioral health disorders on the workplace by direct and indirect costs, its epidemiology in the U.S., and treatment and cost trends. It also describes the state of child and adolescent behavioral health treatment and makes recommendations to employers on how to better address this challenge with adjustments to their health plan and to their workplace culture.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior disorders, Children, Employee benefits, Health insurance, Mental health, Workplace health promotion, Youth

Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Child and Adolescent Health Policy. 2007. Employee benefits study for CSHCN: [Final report]. [Boston, MA]: Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Child and Adolescent Health Policy, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a 2001-2006 study to examine employer-sponsored benefits systems and workplace supports as they relate to employees who have children with special health care needs (CSHCN). Topics include how such benefits were structured, how employers ad purchasers understand the employees' needs for their CSHCN, opportunities for improvements in workplace supports, and how Title V programs can engage employers to improve services to CSHCN. The report contains an executive summary, a description of project goals and objectives, key findings, project implementation, and sustainability and replication. Additional information is provided on products developed during the project and a summary of recommendations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Employee assistance programs, Employee benefits, Final reports, Health care financing, Parent support services, Work family issues, Working parents

National Center for Children in Poverty. 2005. Children, Social Security, and private accounts: 10 questions for policymakers. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about how proposed changes to the Social Security program would affect children. The fact sheet includes a list of basic facts about Social Security and a list of questions about private accounts. Endnotes are included.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Disability benefits, Disability insurance, Families, Poverty, Social Security, Survivors

Finch RA, Phillips K. 2005. An employer's guide to behavioral health services: A roadmap and recommendations for evaluating, designing, and implementing behavioral health services. Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 95 pp.

Annotation: This guide examines the employer's role in behavioral health care, a continuum of health services for individuals at risk or, or having, mental, behavioral, or addictive disorders. It examines major trends in the epidemiology, treatment, and cost of behavioral healthcare in the United State, discusses the state of employer-sponsored behavioral health services, and makes recommendations to improve the design, delivery, and purchase of employer-sponsored behavioral healthcare services. It also provides an overview of the President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Employee benefits, Employer initiatives, Health care programs, Health insurance programs, Mental disorders, Mental health, Strategic plans, Substance abuse

Ruhm CJ. 2004. How well do parents with young children combine work and family life?. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 23 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 10247)

Annotation: This report examines trends in labor force involvement, household structure, and some activities that may complicate the efforts of parents with young children to balance work and family life. It considers whether employer policies mitigate or exacerbate these difficulties and provides comparisons between U.S. policies and those of other industrialized countries, and it speculates on some possible sources and effects of the differences. Additional topics include changes in labor supply, time investments, employer benefits, family leave policies, maternal employment and child care. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures grouped together at the end of the report. The report also includes a reference list.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Administrative policy, Child care, Employer benefits, Employer initiatives, Families, Family economics, Family leave, Family support, Work family issues, Working mothers, Working parents, Young children

Rees C, Finch R. 2004. Health improvement: A comprehensive guide to designing, implementing, and evaluating worksite programs. Washington, DC: Center for Prevention and Health Services, National Business Group on Health, 15 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This guide is for employers interested in health improvement, regardless of whether the company is looking to design a new program altogether or thinking about options to improve or expand existing programs. It provides the following: (1) information on the structure of health improvement programs, (2) the business case for health improvement, (3) examples of best practices, and (4) the means for evaluation. A summary is provided as well as tips and resources for employers. References are also included.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Business, Employee assistance programs, Employee benefits, Fiscal management, Models, Program development, Program evaluation, Workplace health promotion

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.