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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (66 total).

John Snow, Inc. 2016. Fostering effective integration of behavioral health and primary care in Massachusetts: Year 1 report. Boston, MA: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Foundation, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report synthesizes the activities of 10 primary care and behavioral health organizations with established integration programs in Massachusetts to identify success factors, barriers, challenges, and opportunities for change. Contents include a description of grantee organizations followed by a description of findings related to how they defined success for their integration efforts, perceptions of the critical components of integrated programs, common barriers to integration, and measures used to assess programs. The evaluation framework, a list of the process and outcome data elements collected by grantees, and grantee profiles are appended.

Contact: John Snow, Inc., 44 Farnsworth Street, Boston, MA 02210-1211, Telephone: (617) 482-9485 Fax: (617) 482-0617 E-mail: jsinfo@jsi.com Web Site: http://www.jsi.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Data collection, Demonstration grants, Evaluation methods, Health care delivery, Massachusetts, Measures, Mental health, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Primary care, Program evaluation, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Service integration

Roth MS, Allman A, Wilhite BC. 2014–. Health and wellness for adolescent girls and women with mental and behavioral health conditions: Knowledge path (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This knowledge path aims to bridge the public health and mental health information needs of professionals on approaches to promoting optimal health and wellness for women of childbearing age who experience a mental, emotional, or behavioral heath condition. The resource covers topics relevant to health promotion and disease prevention for all women, and specifically for women with mental and behavioral health disorders. Topics include reproductive and maternal health, intentional injury, chronic conditions, healthy behaviors, and health disparities. Contents include websites, distance learning tools, reports, data and statistics, journal articles and other literature and research, and guides on related topics. A separate brief presents resources for women and their families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Consumer education materials, Disease prevention, Emotional disorders, Health promotion, Mental health, Resources for professionals, Women

Morgan E, Salomon N, Plotkin M, Cohen R. 2014. The school discipline consensus report: Strategies from the field to keep students engaged in school and out of the juvenile justice system. Lexington, KY: Council of State Governments, 436 pp.

Annotation: This report presents strategies to support educators and minimize school systems' dependence on suspension, expulsion, and arrest to manage student behaviors while promoting safe and productive learning environments that improve academic outcomes for all students and reduce their involvement in the juvenile justice system. Topics include conditions for learning, targeted behavioral interventions, school-police partnerships, courts and juvenile justice, information sharing, and data collection.

Contact: Council of State Governments, 2760 Research Park Drive, P. O. Box 11910, Lexington, KY 40578-1910, Telephone: (859) 244-8000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 800-1910 Fax: (859) 244-8001 E-mail: csg@csg.org Web Site: http://www.csg.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Collaboration, Criminal justice system, Discipline, Juvenile justice, Learning, Policy development, Prevention programs, Public private partnerships, Risk factors, School age children, School attendance, School failure, School role, School safety, Students, Systems development

Building Bridges Initiative. 2014. Supporting siblings when a brother or sister is receiving residential interventions: Key issues and tips for providers and families. [no place]: Building Bridges Initiative, 11 pp. (A Building Bridges Initiative tip sheet)

Annotation: This tip sheet provides an overview of key issues and tips for supporting siblings when a brother or sister is receiving residential interventions for behavioral and/or emotional challenges. Contents include background on why it is important to support siblings and strategies for families and other caregivers.

Contact: Building Bridges Initiative, U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration, E-mail: gary.blau@samhsa.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.buildingbridges4youth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Family centered services, Family support programs, Mental health, Residential care, Siblings

Klebanov PK. (2013). Variation in home visiting of the first three years of life: Links to family characteristics, aspects of home visits, and child outcomes. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University and Columbia University, 44 pp.

Annotation: This paper, which focuses on the Infant Health and Development Program, a randomized multisite study of 985 low-birthweight infants and their families, examines the following three questions: (1) What are the different patterns of home visits? (2) Which child, maternal, and family demographic characteristics and qualities of the home visit are associated with these home-visitation patterns? (3) Are higher frequency patterns of home visits associated with positive effects for children's cognitive and behavioral outcomes and mothers' depression, social support, and knowledge of child development? The authors also examine the significance of the home environment. The paper includes a literature review and a description of the study method, measures, data analysis, and results.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Cognitive development, Depression, Early childhood development, Families, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant development, Infants, Low birthweight infants, Low income groups, Mothers, Parent support programs, Postpartum depression, Programs, Young children

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. Long-term consequences of child abuse and neglect. [Rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 10 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses the long-term consequences of child abuse and neglect. The fact sheet covers (1) factors affecting the consequences of child abuse and neglect, (2) physical health consequences, (3) psychological consequences, (4) behavioral consequences, and (5) societal consequences. The fact sheet is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior, Behavior problems, Child abuse, Child health, Child neglect, Mental disorder, Mental health, Spanish language materials

Allen KD, Hendricks T. 2013. Medicaid and children in foster care. Washington DC: First Focus, 14 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides information about the health care needs of children in foster care and the role of Medicaid in providing health coverage for this population. The brief also highlights existing policy levers that may help address some of the health and well-being issues that children in foster care face.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, Behavior problems, Child health, Child welfare, Emotional instability, Foster care, Foster children, Health care systems, Juvenile justice, Medicaid, Mental health, Public policy

RTI International–University of North Carolina Evidence-Based Practice Center. 2013. Child exposure to trauma: Comparative effectiveness of interventions addressing maltreatment. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, ca. 400 pp. (Comparative effectiveness review; no. 89)

Annotation: This review assesses the comparative effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological interventions for infants, children, and adolescents from birth through age 14 exposed to maltreatment in addressing child well-being outcomes (mental and behavioral health; caregiver-child relationship; cognitive, language, and physical development; and school-based functioning) and child welfare outcomes (safety, placement stability, and permanency). The review also assesses the comparative effectiveness of interventions with (1) different treatment characteristics, (2) for child and caregiver subgroups, and (3) for engaging and retaining children and caregivers in treatment. In addition, the review assesses harms associated with interventions for this population.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 13-EHC002-EF.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Behavior problems, Child abuse, Child development, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Infant development, Infants, Intervention, Language development, Maltreated children, Mental health, Parent child relations, Physical development, Safety, School failure, School readiness, Treatment

Towvim L, Carney N, Thomas B, Repetti J, Roman L, Blaber C, Anderson K. 2013. School mental health: Snapshots from the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative. Waltham, MA: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights key characteristics of effective school mental health (SMH) and the strategies that federal Safe Schools/Health Students (SS/HS) initiative grantees have used to build and sustain comprehensive mental health programs. The report discusses what effective, comprehensive SMH does, describes key features of effective SMH, discusses SS/HS, and provides a close look at 13 SS/HS sites, focusing on key successes and lessons learned.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453, Telephone: (877) 217-3595 Fax: (617) 969-5951 E-mail: info@promoteprevent.org Web Site: http://www.promoteprevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Academic achievement, Access to health care, Adolescent mental health, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child mental health, Emotional instability, Health promotion, Initiatives, Mental disorders, Mental health, Mental health services, Safety, School age children, School health

Child Trends Data Bank. 2013. Steroid use: Indicators on children and youth (upd.). [Bethesda, MD]: Child Trends Data Bank, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about anabolic steroid use among students in grades 8, 10, and 12. The report discusses the importance of the issue (including health problems and behavior problems related to steroid use in adolescents); trends; differences by gender, race, and HIspanic origin, and college plans; state and local estimates; international estimates; and national goals.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Athletes, Eduational factors, Ethnic factors, Mental health problems, Racial factors, Risk taking, Sex factors, Statistical data, Steroids, Substance abuse, Trends

Perencevich A. 2013. Positive school discipline: Opportunities to promote behavioral health. Washington, DC: Grantmakers In Health, 3 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This brief discusses the need for safe and secure schools and the role of school discipline policies such as suspension and expulsion. Topics include ways vulnerable youth are disproportionately affected; negative implications for behavioral health, academic achievement, and life success; and how adopting positive approaches to school discipline can promote social-emotional learning.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior modification, Behavior problems, Discipline, Policy development, Psychosocial development, School age children, School counseling

Marshall N. 2013. Integrating behavioral health and primary care for children and youth: Concepts and strategies. Washington, DC: SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions, 33 pp.

Annotation: This paper outlines different models for organizing the delivery of services for children with behavioral health needs, describes five core competencies of the integrated care systems for children with behavioral health issues, and describes financing mechanisms that can be used to support the approach of integrated care systems for children with behavioral health conditions. Topics include the unmet needs in behavioral supports for children and youth, choosing a service delivery structure, core competencies, and financing integrated care systems. appendices include a chronic care model, a system care concept and philosophy, and additional resources.

Contact: SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions, National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare, 1701 K Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20006, E-mail: integration@thenational council.org Web Site: http://www.integration.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior development, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Children, Health care financing, Health services delivery, Mental health, Models, Service integration

Brandt R, Phillips R. 2013. Improving supports for youth of color traumatized by violence. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the most effective ways to support male children and adolescents traumatized by exposure to violence. The report introduces the problem and then discusses theoretical models and approaches, including school-based employment-based, and care-coordination strategies, improved implementation of service systems; and action steps.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescent males, Behavior modification, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Child development, Communities, Families, Health care systems, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Low income groups, Male children, Poverty, Prevention, Programs, Racial factors, Schools, Service delivery, Trauma, Violence, Violence prevention

University of Colorado Boulder, Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence. 2012–. Blueprints for healthy youth development. Boulder, CO: University of Colorado Boulder, Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence, multiple items.

Annotation: This registry provides information about evidence-based positive youth development programs designed to promote the health and well-being of children and adolescents. Contents include surveys for matching children's strengths and needs to specific programs based on outcome areas, risk and protective factors, and developmental stage; the program review criteria fact sheet, checklist, and standard; a searchable database that provides each program's name, target population, financing strategies, rating (promising or model program), benefits and costs, impact, and summary; instructions for nominating a program; related publications; and other resources.

Contact: University of Colorado Boulder, Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence, 483 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-4083, Telephone: (303) 492-1032 Fax: (303) 492-2151 E-mail: blueprints@colorado.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Behavior problems, Certification, Child development, Children, Databases, Developmental stages, Health promotion, Information sources, Mental health, Model programs, Needs assessment, Prevention programs, Program planning, Protective factors, Registries, Research, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, Surveys, Violence prevention

Allen KD, Pires SA, Mahadevan R. 2012. Improving outcomes for children in child welfare: A Medicaid managed care toolkit. [Hamilton, NJ]: Center for Health Care Strategies, 49 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit describes the efforts of the nine Medicaid managed care organizations (MCOs) that participated in Improving Outcomes for Children Involved in Child Welfare: A CHCS Quality Improvement Collaborative, designed by the Center for Health Care Strategies (CHCS) and funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The toolkit includes a project overview, an overview and description of the impact of the MCOs' initiatives, and discussions of care coordination and lessons learned.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child health, Child welfare, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Collaboration, Ethnic factors, Foster care, Foster children, High risk children, Initiatives, Low income groups, Medicaid managed care, Mental health, Programs, Racial factors

Pastor PN, Reuben CA, Duran CR. 2012. Identifying emotional and behavioral problems in children aged 4-17 years: United States, 2001-2007. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 17 pp. (National health statistics reports; no. 48)

Annotation: This report examines two measures that identify children with emotional and behavioral problems: high scores based on symptom questions in the brief version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (a screening tool developed by Robert Goodman) and a single question about serious overall emotional and behavioral difficulties included in the National Health Interview Survey between 2001-2007. The report discusses the data sources and research methodology; looks at trends in the prevalence of emotional and behavioral problems among girls and boys ages 4 to 17, and examines risk factors based on the analysis of the survey data. Tables include selected diagnostic developmental conditions such as learning and intellectual disabilities among children, by age group and category of emotional and behavioral problem.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS Pub No. (PHS) 2012-1250.

Keywords: Behavior development, Behavior problems, Child health, Emotional development, Measures, National surveys, Research, Trends

Berger LM, McLanahan S,. 2012. Child wellbeing in two-parent families: Influences of parental characteristics, relationships, and behaviors. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 43 pp. (Fragile families working paper: 11-13-FF)

Annotation: This paper examines differences in child outcomes by family type, defined by the marital and biological status of parents who live with a child. The paper investigates the extent to which differences in cognitive skills and behavior problems among 5-year-olds living in different types of families are associated with differences in characteristics, relationships, and behaviors between family types. The authors then decompose the mean difference between family types in each outcome into the proportion explained by differences between family types in characteristics, relationships, and behaviors and the proportion explained by differences between family types in the influence of these factors on outcomes. Methods and results are presented.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Families, Fathers, Marital status, Mothers, Parent child relations, Research, Statistical data, Young children

Honigfeld L, Fenick A, Carvel KM, Vater S, Ward-Zimmerman B. 2012. Mid-level developmental and behavioral assessments: Between screening and evaluation. Farmington, CT: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 22 pp. (Impact)

Annotation: This report discusses the effectiveness of mid-level developmental assessment (MLDA) for children in Connecticut who are at risk for developmental or behavioral problems. MLDA is defined as the expedient assessment of a child with a behavioral or developmental health concerns identified through screening. The report provides information about three MLDA programs, discusses the results of MLDA, and provides considerations for building an MLDA system.

Contact: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 270 Farmington Avenue, Suite 367, Farmington, CT 06032, Telephone: (860) 679-1519 Fax: (860) 679-1521 E-mail: info@chdi.org Web Site: http://www.chdi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child development, Development disabilities, Developmental screening, High risk children, Service delivery systems

National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention. 2012. Supportive school discipline: A snapshot from Safe Schools/Healthy Students initiatives. Newton, MA: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about supportive school discipline—defined as a systemic constellation of programs and practices that promote positive behaviors while preventing negative or risky ones. The report discusses cross-agency partnerships, data-driven decisions, system-wide use of evidence-based programs and practices, and engagement of parents and families as partners. For each topic, examples are provided for specific school districts. A case study of one child who benefited from supportive school discipline is also provided.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453, Telephone: (877) 217-3595 Fax: (617) 969-5951 E-mail: info@promoteprevent.org Web Site: http://www.promoteprevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Discipline, Families, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Parents, Prevention, Programs, Schools

Citizens' Committee for Children of New York. 2012. New York City's children and mental health: Prevalence and gap analysis of treatment slot capacity. New York, NY: Citizens' Committee for Children of New York, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information from a study to assess the gap between the need for mental health treatment slots and the number of treatment slots available for children and adolescents throughout New York City. The report discusses the methodology and presents key findings on child and adolescent mental health needs in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island and key findings on capacity and gap analysis. Appendix G of the report, a PowerPoint presentation, is presented in a separate document.

Contact: Citizens' Committee for Children of New York, 105 East 22nd Street, New York, NY 10010, Telephone: (212) 673-1800 Fax: (212) 979-5063 E-mail: info@cccnewyork.org Web Site: http://www.cccnewyork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Behavior problems, Child mental health, Health care delivery, Health care systems, Health insurance, Low income groups, Managed care, Medicaid, Mental health problems, New York, Research, Statistical data, Treatment, Uninsured persons

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.