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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (39 total).

Healthy Teen Network and ETR Associates. n.d.. Weaving science & practice: Frequently asked questions about science-based approaches. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 20 pp.

Annotation: This document describes seven science-based approaches in adolescent pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infection prevention. Topics include assessment, health education and behavior change theory, logic models, science-based programs, adaptation and fidelity, characteristics of promising programs, and process and outcome evaluation. Additional topics include the benefits of using science-based approaches, ten steps for getting to outcomes, and training and technical assistance.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Assessment, Behavior modification, HIV, Health behavior, Health education, Methods, Models, Outcome evaluation, Prevention programs, Process evaluation, Sexually transmitted diseases

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2016. Preventing childhood obesity in Michigan's classrooms: A collaboration between Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and statewide partners. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 4 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet describes Building Healthy Communities, a school-based prevention program in Michigan to help children adopt healthy habits at a young age by providing access to healthy food, health education, physical education, and physical activity. Contents include a description of the program's development and implementation process, outcomes, and next steps. Topics include partnering organization efforts to pool funding, resources, and expertise to engage elementary schools and expand to middle and high schools throughout the state.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior modification, Children, Collaboration, Curriculum, Elementary schools, Health behavior, Health promotion, High schools, Michigan, Middle schools, Nutrition education, Nutrition services, Obesity, Outcome and process assessment, Physical activity, Physical education, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Public private partnerships, School health education, School health programs, State programs, Statewide planning

St. Jean E. 2015. How oral health and mental health are connected. Washington, DC: National Association of Counties, 4 pp.

Annotation: This brief discusses factors that may affect the oral health of individuals living with mental illness. It also addresses strategies and activities that, if implemented, have the potential to impact health behavior and promote intervention. Topics include co-locating community-based oral, behavioral, and primary health care services; teaching behavioral health professionals about oral hygiene and motivational interviewing techniques; and providing information to families and other caregivers about protective factors such as avoiding tobacco use, eating healthy foods, and engaging in regular physical activity that can potentially reduce disparities in access and improve the oral health status of individuals with mental illness.

Contact: National Association of Counties, 25 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 393-6226 Web Site: http://www.naco.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior modification, Behavioral medicine, Community based services, Health behavior, Intervention, Mental health, Oral health, Primary care, Protective factors, Risk factors, Service integration, Work force

Kearney MS, Levine PB. 2014. Media influences on social outcomes: The impact of MTV's 16 and pregnant on teen childbearing. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 43 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 19795)

Annotation: This paper explores the impact of a reality television series, MTV's 16 and Pregnant, on adolescent attitudes and outcomes. Contents include background information on the show's content and previous research on the impact of media exposure; a description of the data including Nielson ratings, Google trends, and Twitter activity; a descriptive analysis of adolescents' exposure to the show; and analyses of high frequency data on searches and tweets and data on adolescent births. Topics include changes in searches and tweets, geographic variation in viewership, and changes in adolescent birth rates.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org $5.

Keywords: , Abortion, Adolescent attitudes, Attitude change, Behavior modification, Contraception, Economic factors, Health behavior, Interactive media, Media, Outcome evaluation, Sexual behavior

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2014. Drug use, illicit: Primary care interventions for children and adolescents. Rockville, MD: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, multiple items.

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2014. Leading change 2.0: Advancing the behavioral health of the nation 2015-2018. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 34 pp.

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2014. Sexually transmitted infections: Behavioral counseling. Rockville, MD: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, multiple items.

SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions. 2014. Advancing behavioral health integration within NCQA recognized patient-centered medical homes. Washington, DC: SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions, 23 pp.

Annotation: This document reviews the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Program standards as they relate to the integration of behavioral health and primary care. The review highlights four NCQA-PCMH standards which include elements and factors specific to behavioral health integration and applies an expanded interpretation of all standards through the lens of behavioral health integration. Topics include patient-centered access, team-based care, population health management, care management and support, care coordination and transitions, performance measurement and quality improvement. Detail about implementing the elements is included.

Contact: SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions, National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare, 1701 K Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20006, E-mail: integration@thenational council.org Web Site: http://www.integration.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior modification, Behavioral medicine, Family centered care, Medical home, Mental health, Model programs, Primary care, Program development, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Service integration, Standards

Perencevich A. 2013. Positive school discipline: Opportunities to promote behavioral health. Washington, DC: Grantmakers In Health, 3 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This brief discusses the need for safe and secure schools and the role of school discipline policies such as suspension and expulsion. Topics include ways vulnerable youth are disproportionately affected; negative implications for behavioral health, academic achievement, and life success; and how adopting positive approaches to school discipline can promote social-emotional learning.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior modification, Behavior problems, Discipline, Policy development, Psychosocial development, School age children, School counseling

Lawner EK, Terzian MA. 2013. What works for bullying programs: Lessons from experimental evaluations of programs and interventions. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 9 pp.

Annotation: This report synthesizes findings from experimental evaluations of 17 bullying programs for children and adolescents. Topics include how frequently these programs work to improve the outcomes of physical and verbal bullying, social and relational bullying, bullying victimization, attitudes toward bullying, and being a bystander of bullying.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Attitude change, Behavior modification, Bullying, Children, Community programs, Outcome evaluation, Program evaluation

Brandt R, Phillips R. 2013. Improving supports for youth of color traumatized by violence. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the most effective ways to support male children and adolescents traumatized by exposure to violence. The report introduces the problem and then discusses theoretical models and approaches, including school-based employment-based, and care-coordination strategies, improved implementation of service systems; and action steps.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescent males, Behavior modification, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Child development, Communities, Families, Health care systems, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Low income groups, Male children, Poverty, Prevention, Programs, Racial factors, Schools, Service delivery, Trauma, Violence, Violence prevention

Bedard Holland S. 2013. Motivational interviewing. Glen Allen, VA: Virginia Oral Health Coalition, 1 v.

Annotation: This presentation describes techniques to communicate the importance of prevention and good oral health. Contents include a description of motivational interviewing including what it is, when it can be used, and reasons to use it. Topics include stages of change and why they are important, developing a relationship and understanding client frame of reference, presenting new information and positive action steps. Other topics include presenting a menu of options, determining action steps and making a plan, discussing potential challenges and solutions, and providing ongoing support. Cultural competence, beliefs that may impact oral health, and strategies for overcoming resistance are also addressed

Contact: Virginia Health Catalyst, 4200 Innslake Drive, Suite 103, Glen Allen, VA 23060, Telephone: (804) 269-8720 E-mail: info@vahealthcatalyst.org Web Site: https://vahealthcatalyst.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior modification, Beliefs, Communication skills, Cultural competence, Disease prevention, Health behavior, Interviews, Methods, Motivation, Oral health

Pew Center on the States, Home Visiting Campaign. 2012. Addressing challenging behavior in children. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States, (The case for home visiting video series)

Annotation: This archived webinar, originally broadcast June 5, 2012, shares effective strategies that both home visiting professionals and parents can use to prevent and respond to disruptive or challenging behavior from their children and promote healthier families.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Behavior development, Behavior modification, Children, Family relations, Home visiting, Parenting skills

Public Health Agency of Canada. 2012. Joint statement on safe sleep: Preventing sudden infant deaths in Canada. [Ottowa, Ontario, CANADA]: Public Health Agency of Canada,

Annotation: This statement was developed to provide health professionals with current, evidence-based information to enable them to offer parents and caregivers information and support to reduce the risk of death due to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and unsafe sleep practices in Canada. The statement provides background information about SIDS and discusses principles of safe sleep and modifiable risk factors.

Contact: Public Health Agency of Canada, 130 Colonnade Road, A.L. 6501H, Ottowa, Ontario, CANADA K1A 0K9, E-mail: http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/contac-eng.php#general Web Site: http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior modification, Guidelines, Infant death, International health, Risk factors, SIDS, Safety, Sleep position

National Diabetes Education Program. 2011-. Diabetes HealthSense. Bethesda, MD: National Diabetes Education Program,

Annotation: These resources are designed to help people prevent or manage diabetes. Contents include tracking tools, printable documents, online and inperson programs, videos and podcasts, presentations, mobile applications, and websites. Topics include eating healthy, being active, managing weight, coping with stress and emotions, setting goals, stopping smoking, preventing diabetes-related health problems, and checking blood glucose. The resources can be searched by topic, age, type of resource, or language (English, Spanish, and Vietnamese). Resources are are also available for people with diabetes or prediabetes, and those at risk for diabetes; family members, friends, or caregivers; health professionals; teachers or school health professionals; community health workers; and community organizations. A community health promotion toolkit is also available.

Contact: National Diabetes Education Program, One Diabetes Way, Bethesda, MD 20841-9692, Telephone: (301) 496-3583 Web Site: http://ndep.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Asian language materials, Behavior modification, Diabetes, Health behavior, Health promotion, Multimedia, Non English language materials, Self care, Spanish language materials

Kolander CA, Ballard D, Chandler C. 2011. Contemporary women's health: Issues for today and the future (4th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill, 462 pp.

Annotation: Presented in five parts, this textbook for health and community services professionals and the general public focuses on women's health issues throughout the life cycle with each chapter including a summary, review questions, resource listings and references. Contents include: pt. 1. Foundations of women's health : Introducing women's health ; Becoming a wise consumer ; Developing a healthy lifestyle -- pt. 2. Mental and emotional wellness : Enhancing emotional well-being ; Managing the stress of life -- pt. 3. Sexual and relational wellness : Building healthy relationships ; Exploring women's sexuality ; Designing your reproductive life plan ; Preventing abuse against women -- pt. 4. Contemporary lifestyle and social issues : Eating well ; Keeping fit ; Using alcohol responsibly ; Making wise decisions about tobacco, caffeine, and drugs -- pt. 5. Communicable and chronic conditions : Preventing and controlling infectious diseases ; Preventing and controlling chronic health conditions ; Reducing your risk of cancer.

Contact: McGraw-Hill Companies, PO Box 182604, Columbus, OH 43272, Telephone: (877) 833-5524 Fax: (614) 759-3749 E-mail: customer.service@mcgraw-hill.com Web Site: http://www.mcgraw-hill.com $72.80. Document Number: ISBN 0-8151-0626-2.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alternative medicine, Behavior modification, Caffeine, Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Communicable diseases, Consumer education, Contraceptives, Depression, Developmental stages, Domestic abuse, Drug abuse, Eating disorders, Gynecology, Holistic health, Interpersonal relations, Life cycle, Lifestyle, Nutrition, Parenting, Pregnancy, Self esteem, Smoking, Stress management, Weight management, Women's health

Delgado JL. 2011. The buena salud guide for a healthy heart. Washington, DC: National Alliance for Hispanic Health, 126 pp. (The buena salud series)

Annotation: This book identifies key factors that define cardiovascular health, the changes that individuals and families can make to live healthier lives, and the tools to do so. The content is presented in three parts. Part one addresses what we know about the heart and Hispanics, how the heart works, life changes to consider (things to do and things to avoid), and a 10-point program for health. Part two presents facts on frequently asked about conditions and information on the tests and procedures that are used to diagnose and treat heart conditions. Part three offers resources and tools such as noncommercial web sites, space to write down information about health care visits and medicines, vitamins, supplements, teas, etc. Questions to ask a health care provider about a diagnosis, a diagnostic test, surgery or procedures, or recovery after surgery or procedures are also included. It is in Spanish.

Contact: Buena Salud Club, Telephone: (866) 783-2645 Web Site: http://www.buenasaludclub.org $9.95.

Keywords: Behavior modification, Cardiovascular diseases, Cardiovascular tests, Consumer education materials, Diagnostic techniques, Ethnic factors, Health behavior, Health promotion, Hispanic Americans, Spanish language materials, Surgery

Delgado JL. 2011. The buena salud guide to diabetes and your life. Washington, DC: National Alliance for Hispanic Health, 128 pp. (The buena salud series)

Annotation: This book identifies key factors that define diabetes, the changes that individuals and families can make to live healthier lives, and the tools to do so. Part one addresses who has diabetes, risk factors, diabetes and other conditions, and a 10-point program for health. Part two presents facts on frequently asked about conditions, lists abbreviations that are commonly used, describes diagnostic tests for diabetes, and presents information about the major types of diabetes. Part three offers resources and tools such as space to write in personal health and health care visit information and questions to ask a health care provider. Resources with diabetes information are also included. It is in Spanish.

Contact: Buena Salud Club, Telephone: (866) 783-2645 Web Site: http://www.buenasaludclub.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Behavior modification, Consumer education materials, Diabetes, Diagnostic techniques, Ethnic factors, Health behavior, Health promotion, Hispanic Americans, Spanish language materials

Khan K. 2011. "215-GO!" - A childhood obesity project: [Final report]. Philadelphia, PA: Philadelphia Department of Public Health, 12 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This final report describes a 2006-2011 project in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to identify, prevent, and treat childhood obesity and related complications by promoting positive lifestyle behavior and motivating patients toward a healthier weight. Contents of the report include a description of the purpose of the program, goals and objectives, the program methodology, and evaluation measures. Additional information is provided on publications or products developed during the project and a summary of the dissemination or utilization of results. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior modification, Child health, Children, Disease prevention, Final reports, Nutrition, Obesity, Pennsylvania

Cuffe HE, Harbaugh WT, Lindo JM, Musto G, Waddell GR. 2011. Evidence on the efficacy of school-based incentives for healthy living. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 25 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17478)

Annotation: This report analyzes the effects of a school-based incentive program developed to promote physical activity among school-aged children by encouraging them to walk or bike to school. The report summarizes research indicating how sedentary lifestyles contribute to poor health outcomes and highlights the absence of research studies that have focused on children's health behavior despite high levels of obesity among American youth. The report describes the design of the school-based incentive program; discusses the models used to measure the impacts of the program; and discusses the overall effects of prizes offered to encourage certain types of behavior during the program. Included is an empirical analysis of the findings and a summary of outcomes based on the age and gender of the participating children, as well as the time of year during which the children were encouraged to walk or bike to school. Tables indicate the extent to which various rewards impacted behavior outcomes.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website, after free registration.

Keywords: Behavior modification, Child behavior, Child health, Model programs, Physical activity, Prevention, Research, School linked programs

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.