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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (84 total).

Poisson S. n.d.. Maternal and Child Health Cooperative Agreement [Final report]. Rockville, MD: Reginald S. Lourie Center for Infants and Young Children, 52 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to develop and implement comprehensive and family-centered approaches to early identification, assessment, and treatment of infants and young children who are at risk for or suffering from emotional and/or regulatory difficulties. To this end, the Regional Center for Infants and Young Children: (1) Monitored types of families and children referred to and receiving services from an agency specializing in the early detection of emotional disorders or potential risk; (2) developed principles and technology to identify infants and young children/families at risk for psychosocial and developmental difficulties; (3) developed comprehensive, family-centered approaches to assessment and diagnosis; (4) developed prevention-oriented, family-centered approaches to intervention; (5) developed and disseminated technical assistance and training approaches; (6) engaged State and local maternal and child health (MCH) agencies in the project; and (7) accessed multiple financial resources to support its efforts. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158236.

Keywords: Affective Disorders, Behavioral Disorders, Data Collection, Family-Centered Health Care, High risk groups: Families, High risk infants, Parents, Regulatory Disorders, Screening Tools, Temperament

John Snow, Inc. 2016. Fostering effective integration of behavioral health and primary care in Massachusetts: Year 1 report. Boston, MA: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Foundation, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report synthesizes the activities of 10 primary care and behavioral health organizations with established integration programs in Massachusetts to identify success factors, barriers, challenges, and opportunities for change. Contents include a description of grantee organizations followed by a description of findings related to how they defined success for their integration efforts, perceptions of the critical components of integrated programs, common barriers to integration, and measures used to assess programs. The evaluation framework, a list of the process and outcome data elements collected by grantees, and grantee profiles are appended.

Contact: John Snow, Inc., 44 Farnsworth Street, Boston, MA 02210-1211, Telephone: (617) 482-9485 Fax: (617) 482-0617 E-mail: jsinfo@jsi.com Web Site: http://www.jsi.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Data collection, Demonstration grants, Evaluation methods, Health care delivery, Massachusetts, Measures, Mental health, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Primary care, Program evaluation, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Service integration

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2016. Facing addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s report on alcohol, drugs, and health. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, multiple items.

Annotation: This report reviews what is known about substance misuse and how that knowledge can be used to address substance misuse and related consequences. Contents include information and findings related to neurobiology, prevention, treatment, recovery, and health care systems. The report concludes with a vision for the future including five general messages and their implications for policy and practice, and recommendations for specific stakeholder groups. Supplementary materials such as fact sheets on specific findings and recommendations for different audiences and a toolkit for promoting the report are also available.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care systems, Medical treatment, Policy development, Public private partnerships, Substance abusers, Substance dependence, Substance use behavior, Substance use disorders, Substance use screening

Perry J, Kaufman B, Vasquez E. 2015. Strategic thinking report: LEND and DBP programs. Silver Spring, MD: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes findings from interviews and meetings with maternal and child (MCH) health program directors and other stakeholders about future directions for the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) and Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics (DBP) training programs. Contents include recommendations for strategic action in the following five areas: training pipelines for LEND and DBP programs; models of training and clinical care that are accessible and can be sustained; opportunities for trainees to learn and apply principles of MCH leadership training; collaboration with Title V and other partners; and policies and practices important to LEND and DBP programs, individuals with disabilities and their families, and the professionals who serve them. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1000, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 588-8252 Fax: (301) 588-2842 E-mail: aucdinfo@aucd.org Web Site: http://www.aucd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior development, Child development disorders, Collaboration, Developmental disabilities, Developmental pediatrics, Leadership, MCH training programs, Model programs, Pediatric neurology, Policy development, Strategic plans, Title V programs

Roth MS, Allman A, Wilhite BC. 2014–. Health and wellness for adolescent girls and women with mental and behavioral health conditions: Knowledge path (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This knowledge path aims to bridge the public health and mental health information needs of professionals on approaches to promoting optimal health and wellness for women of childbearing age who experience a mental, emotional, or behavioral heath condition. The resource covers topics relevant to health promotion and disease prevention for all women, and specifically for women with mental and behavioral health disorders. Topics include reproductive and maternal health, intentional injury, chronic conditions, healthy behaviors, and health disparities. Contents include websites, distance learning tools, reports, data and statistics, journal articles and other literature and research, and guides on related topics. A separate brief presents resources for women and their families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Consumer education materials, Disease prevention, Emotional disorders, Health promotion, Mental health, Resources for professionals, Women

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find mental health care, services, and support and websites about emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens. A separate section presents websites about babies and young kids. Another lists websites for teens. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Affective disorders, Behavior development, Behavior disorders, Bibliographies, Children, Electronic publications, Emotional development, Family support services, Mental health, Psychological needs, Social behavior

Stroul BA, Pires SA, Boyce S, Krivelyova A, Walrath C. 2014. Return on investment in systems of care for children with behavioral health challenges. Washington, DC: National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, 64 pp.

Annotation: This report documents what is known to date about the return on investment, specifically cost savings, from the systems of care approach to funding services for children and youth who have serious mental health conditions. It includes findings from national, multi-site, and individual state and community evaluations.

Contact: National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, 3300 Whitehaven Street, Suite 3300, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: childrensmh@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchdtacenter.georgetown.edu/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Case studies, Children with special health care needs, Community programs, Cost effectiveness, Health care financing, Health care systems, Mental disorders

Abram KM, Choe JY, Washburn JJ, Teplin LA, King DC, Dulcan MK, Bassett ED. 2014. Suicidal thoughts and behaviors among detained youth. U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 11 pp. (Juvenile Justice Bulletin )

Annotation: This bulletin examines suicidal thoughts and behaviors among 1,829 children and adolescents (ages 10 to 18) in the Northwestern Juvenile Project, a longitudinal study of children and adolescents detained at the Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center in Chicago, IL. Contents include a description of the study literature review and methods, and a discussion of the findings. Topics include hopelessness, thoughts about death and dying, thoughts about suicide, suicide plan, telling someone about suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts, and psychiatric disorders that may increase the odds of suicide attempts.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20531, Telephone: (202) 307-5911 Web Site: http://www.ojjdp.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Attempted suicide, Children, Juvenile justice, Longitudinal studies, Mental health, Psychiatric disorders, Risk factors, Self destructive behavior, Statistical analysis

Klebanov PK. (2013). Variation in home visiting of the first three years of life: Links to family characteristics, aspects of home visits, and child outcomes. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University and Columbia University, 44 pp.

Annotation: This paper, which focuses on the Infant Health and Development Program, a randomized multisite study of 985 low-birthweight infants and their families, examines the following three questions: (1) What are the different patterns of home visits? (2) Which child, maternal, and family demographic characteristics and qualities of the home visit are associated with these home-visitation patterns? (3) Are higher frequency patterns of home visits associated with positive effects for children's cognitive and behavioral outcomes and mothers' depression, social support, and knowledge of child development? The authors also examine the significance of the home environment. The paper includes a literature review and a description of the study method, measures, data analysis, and results.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Cognitive development, Depression, Early childhood development, Families, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant development, Infants, Low birthweight infants, Low income groups, Mothers, Parent support programs, Postpartum depression, Programs, Young children

Towvim L, Carney N, Thomas B, Repetti J, Roman L, Blaber C, Anderson K. 2013. School mental health: Snapshots from the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative. Waltham, MA: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights key characteristics of effective school mental health (SMH) and the strategies that federal Safe Schools/Health Students (SS/HS) initiative grantees have used to build and sustain comprehensive mental health programs. The report discusses what effective, comprehensive SMH does, describes key features of effective SMH, discusses SS/HS, and provides a close look at 13 SS/HS sites, focusing on key successes and lessons learned.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453, Telephone: (877) 217-3595 Fax: (617) 969-5951 E-mail: info@promoteprevent.org Web Site: http://www.promoteprevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Academic achievement, Access to health care, Adolescent mental health, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child mental health, Emotional instability, Health promotion, Initiatives, Mental disorders, Mental health, Mental health services, Safety, School age children, School health

Honigfeld L, Fenick A, Carvel KM, Vater S, Ward-Zimmerman B. 2012. Mid-level developmental and behavioral assessments: Between screening and evaluation. Farmington, CT: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 22 pp. (Impact)

Annotation: This report discusses the effectiveness of mid-level developmental assessment (MLDA) for children in Connecticut who are at risk for developmental or behavioral problems. MLDA is defined as the expedient assessment of a child with a behavioral or developmental health concerns identified through screening. The report provides information about three MLDA programs, discusses the results of MLDA, and provides considerations for building an MLDA system.

Contact: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 270 Farmington Avenue, Suite 367, Farmington, CT 06032, Telephone: (860) 679-1519 Fax: (860) 679-1521 E-mail: info@chdi.org Web Site: http://www.chdi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child development, Development disabilities, Developmental screening, High risk children, Service delivery systems

National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention. 2012. Supportive school discipline: A snapshot from Safe Schools/Healthy Students initiatives. Newton, MA: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about supportive school discipline—defined as a systemic constellation of programs and practices that promote positive behaviors while preventing negative or risky ones. The report discusses cross-agency partnerships, data-driven decisions, system-wide use of evidence-based programs and practices, and engagement of parents and families as partners. For each topic, examples are provided for specific school districts. A case study of one child who benefited from supportive school discipline is also provided.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453, Telephone: (877) 217-3595 Fax: (617) 969-5951 E-mail: info@promoteprevent.org Web Site: http://www.promoteprevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Discipline, Families, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Parents, Prevention, Programs, Schools

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2012. Community Circle of Care [Iowa]. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about Community Circle of Care, a regional systems of care site comprising a coordinated network of community-based services and supports that is organized to meet the challenges of children and adolescents with serious mental problems and disorders and their families. The fact sheet discusses the following topics: demographics; referral, diagnosis, and family history; reduction in out-of-home placements; improvement in behavior problems; and improvement in caregiver strain. Brief stories told from the points of view of adolescents who have benefited from Community of Care are also included. The service area of this project was 10 counties in northeast Iowa.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent mental health, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Child mental health, Community services, Diagnosis, Families, Family support services, Mental disorders, Program coordination, Programs, Referral, Service coordination, State initiatives

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. 2012. Data-based planning for effective prevention: State epidemiological outcomes workgroups. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the evolution, structure, and accomplishments of state epidemiological outcomes workgroups (SEOWs) as a key component of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's support of states as they address problems related to substance abuse and mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders. The report highlights SEOW successes and offers guidance for providing data to support prevention decision-making in the future at the state and community levels. Throughout the report, quotes from SEOW members illustrate the value of SEOWs to prevention programming in states and communities throughout the United States.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SAMHSA Pub. No. (SMA) 12-4724.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Community programs, Emotional instability, Mental disorders, Mental health, Prevention, State programs, Statistical data, Substance abuse

National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. 2012. Establishing a level foundation for life: Mental health begins in early childhood. (Rev. ed.). Cambridge, MA: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 12 pp. (Working paper no. 6)

Annotation: This working paper focuses on how experiences in early childhood can affect mental health and on the significance of emotional and behavioral difficulties that emerge during a child's early years. The paper discusses scientific evidence related to mental health and early childhood experiences, addressing common misconceptions, the science-policy gap, and implication for policy and programs.

Contact: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: info@developingchild.net Web Site: http://www.developingchild.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Intervention, Mental disorders, Mental health, Prevention, Public policy, Research, Treatment, Young children

Kolander CA, Ballard D, Chandler C. 2011. Contemporary women's health: Issues for today and the future (4th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill, 462 pp.

Annotation: Presented in five parts, this textbook for health and community services professionals and the general public focuses on women's health issues throughout the life cycle with each chapter including a summary, review questions, resource listings and references. Contents include: pt. 1. Foundations of women's health : Introducing women's health ; Becoming a wise consumer ; Developing a healthy lifestyle -- pt. 2. Mental and emotional wellness : Enhancing emotional well-being ; Managing the stress of life -- pt. 3. Sexual and relational wellness : Building healthy relationships ; Exploring women's sexuality ; Designing your reproductive life plan ; Preventing abuse against women -- pt. 4. Contemporary lifestyle and social issues : Eating well ; Keeping fit ; Using alcohol responsibly ; Making wise decisions about tobacco, caffeine, and drugs -- pt. 5. Communicable and chronic conditions : Preventing and controlling infectious diseases ; Preventing and controlling chronic health conditions ; Reducing your risk of cancer.

Contact: McGraw-Hill Companies, PO Box 182604, Columbus, OH 43272, Telephone: (877) 833-5524 Fax: (614) 759-3749 E-mail: customer.service@mcgraw-hill.com Web Site: http://www.mcgraw-hill.com $72.80. Document Number: ISBN 0-8151-0626-2.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alternative medicine, Behavior modification, Caffeine, Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Communicable diseases, Consumer education, Contraceptives, Depression, Developmental stages, Domestic abuse, Drug abuse, Eating disorders, Gynecology, Holistic health, Interpersonal relations, Life cycle, Lifestyle, Nutrition, Parenting, Pregnancy, Self esteem, Smoking, Stress management, Weight management, Women's health

National Institute of Mental Health. 2011. Eating disorders. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Mental Health, 10 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information about eating disorders. The document explains what eating disorders are; discusses the different types of eating disorders including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder; explains how eating disorders are treated, and discusses how males are affected and what is being done to better understand and treat eating disorders.

Contact: National Institute of Mental Health, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20892-9663, Telephone: (866) 615-6464 Secondary Telephone: (301) 443-8431 Fax: (301) 443-4279 E-mail: nimhinfo@nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nimh.nih.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 11-4901.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent females, Adolescent males, Anorexia nervosa, Bulimia, Child behavior, Eating disorders, Female children, Male children, Treatment

Maternal and Child Health Information Resource Center. 2010. Children’s emotional, behavioral, and developmental well-being: New data and tools for the field. [Washington, DC]: Maternal and Child Health Information Resource Center, (Dataspeak)

Annotation: In this Webcast focusing on children's emotional, behavioral, and developmental well-being, Dr Rheem Ghandour, a public health analyst from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, discusses the prevalence of emotional, behavioral, and developmental conditions at the national and state levels. Dr. James Perrin, professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, and director of the Center for Child and Adolescent Health Policy at Mass General Hospital for Children, discusses evidence of the increasing rates of emotional, behavioral, and developmental conditions among children, with a focus on autism. Finally, Dr. Jane Foy, professor of pediatrics for Wake Forest University School of Medicine and chairperson for the American Academy of Pediatrics Task Force on Mental Health, discusses the role that the public health community plays in addressing pediatric mental illness and provides resources that the task force developed. Presenter information, an agenda, resources, and a program archive are available.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Information Resource Center, Altarum Institute, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 842-2000 Fax: (202) 728-9469 E-mail: mchirc@altarum.org Web Site: http://www.mchb.hrsa.gov/researchdata/mchirc Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Behavior problems, Child development, Child health, Emotional instability, Mental disorders, Mental health, Multimedia, Public health

Allen KD, Pires SA, Brown J. 2010. Systems of care approaches in residential treatment facilities serving children with serious behavioral health needs. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 12 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief describes the findings of a national survey of residential treatment facilities (RTFs) serving children and youth with serious behavioral health challenges. It explores the extent to which system of care principles are reflected in RTF policies and practices and how they provide home- and community-based services.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Behavior disorders, Child mental health, Health services delivery, Residential care

[Thomas A]. 2010. School as entry points for children's mental health services. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 2 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This issue brief provides information about child and adolescent mental health and the provision of mental health services in the school setting. The report also discusses the magnitude of emotional and behavioral problems among children and adolescents, benefits and challenges of providing school-based mental health services, and opportunities for funders. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Behavior disorders, Child health, Emotional instability, Financing, Low income groups, School age children, School based clinics

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.