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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (235 total).

San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project. n.d.. Including all of us: Caring for children with special needs in early childhood settings—Manual for child care providers. San Diego, CA: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 218 pp.

Annotation: This manual was developed to accompany an 8-hour class. It introduces the concept of mainstreaming and relates it to the principles of early childhood education and best practice guidelines for caring for children with special needs. Module one includes sections on the importance of working with families, ethical issues, laws protecting children with special needs, typical vs. atypical development, how children learn, suggestions for working with parents are included, and diversity resources. Module two deals with motor development and concludes with a bibliography and references. Module three covers social-emotional development and behavioral issues. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 6505 Alvarado Road, Suite 108, San Diego, CA 92120, Telephone: (619) 594-4373 Available in libraries.

Keywords: Americans With Disabilities Act, Child behavior, Child care, Child development, Children with special health care needs, Developmental disabilities, Ethics, Families, Learning, Legislation, Mainstreaming, Motor development, Parents, Psychosocial development, Special education

Hansen KA, Kaufmann RK, Saifer S. n.d.. Education and the culture of democracy: Early childhood practice. Washington, DC: Children's Resources International, 132 pp. (Step by Step: A program for children and families)

Annotation: This book provides a framework for understanding the relationship between early childhood education and the capacity to function effectively in a democracy. It offers guidance, examples, methods, and language to help prepare young children to grow within the culture of democracy. Topics include education and democracy; the child-centered classroom; creating a plan for the child-centered classroom; equality; skills, talent, and creativity; encouragement of positive behavior; development of healthy habits; communication with other children, parents, and others; family and community involvement, and the transition to elementary school.

Contact: Children's Resources International, 2801 New Mexico Avenue, N.W., Suite 1020, Washington, DC 20007, E-mail: pcoughlin@childrensresources.org Document Number: ISBN 1-889544-02-7.

Keywords: Child behavior, Communication, Communities, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Elementary school children, Families, Parents, Preschool children, Young children

Shelov SP, Altmann TR, Hannermann RE. 2019. Caring for your baby and young child: Birth to age 5. (7th ed.). New York, NY: Bantam Books, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide to the first five years of life gives parents and caregivers comprehensive guidance on essential baby and childcare topics including breastfeeding, immunizations, sleep, and much more. All of the advice, including the complete health encyclopedia, has been fully revised and updated to reflect current AAP policy

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org

Keywords: Behavior, Child care, Child development, Child health, Childbirth, Children, Developmental stages, Emergencies, First aid, Immunization, Infant development, Infant health, Infants, Parenting

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Vibrant and healthy kids: Aligning science, practice, and policy to advance health equity. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 597 pp. (Consensus study report)

Annotation: This report provides a brief overview of stressors that affect childhood development and health, a framework for applying current brain and development science to the real world, a roadmap for implementing tailored interventions, and recommendations about improving systems to better align with our understanding of the significant impact of health equity. It builds upon and updates research from Communities in Action: Pathways to Health Equity (2017) and From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development (2000).

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavioral sciences, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Health equity, Infants, Social sciences, Studies, Young children

Jensen F. 2017. The power of the adolescent brain. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1 video (30 min.) (Think, Act, Grow (TAG) Talks)

Annotation: This video shares what researchers have learned about adolescent brain development, functioning, and capacity. It explains the strengths and potential of the adolescent brain; addresses learning, risk behavior, addiction, and mental health issues; and provides practical suggestions for families with adolescents. The video is available as a full-length (30 minute) program, as well as in short, individual segments, and is accompanied by citations, additional resources, a guide to technical terms, and discussion guides for professionals and family members.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2846 E-mail: oah.gov@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior, Child development, Families, Health promotion, Mental health, Protective factors, Resources for professionals, Risk taking

Oregon Health Authority. 2017. Behavioral Health Collaborative report. Salem, OR: Oregon Health Authority, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report presents recommendations for transforming the behavioral health system in Oregon into a coordinated-care model that will integrate behavioral health care with physical care and oral health care. Topics include governance and finance, standards of care and competencies, work force, and information exchange and coordination of care.

Contact: Oregon Health Authority, 500 Summer Street, N.E., E-20, Salem, OR 97301-1097, Telephone: (503) 947-2340 Secondary Telephone: (877) 398-9238 Fax: (503) 947-2341 E-mail: OHPBinfo@state.or.us Web Site: http://www.oregon.gov/oha Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior, Collaboration, Coordination, Mental health, Models, Oregon, Service integration, Statewide planning, Systems development, Work force

Fond M, Kendall-Taylor N, Volmert A, Pineau MG, L’Hôte E. 2017. Seeing the spectrum: Mapping the gaps between expert and public understandings of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in Manitoba. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute, 49 pp.

Annotation: This report presents an empirically-based framing strategy for communicating about fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Contents include a set of principles reflecting expert understanding of what fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is, how alcohol affects fetal development, why women consume alcohol while pregnant, what the effects of FASD are, and how FASD can be prevented and addressed. The report also describes shared but implicit understandings, assumptions, and patterns of reasoning that shape how the public thinks about FASD, points at which expert and public understandings overlap and diverge, and key challenges in communicating about FASD. Recommendations are included.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Beliefs, Communication, Culturally competent services, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fetal development, Prevention services, Research, Trauma care

Interagency Committee on Human Nutrition Research. 2016. National nutrition research roadmap 2016–2021: Advancing nutrition research to improve and sustain health. Washington, DC: Interagency Committee on Human Nutrition Research, 166 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines a strategic plan to identify critical human nutrition research gaps and foster a coordinated approach to address knowledge gaps, accelerate innovations, and strengthen the capacity of the interdisciplinary workforce required to bring the innovations to fruition. Topics include how to better understand and define eating patterns to improve and sustain health, what can be done to help people choose healthy eating patterns, and how to develop and engage innovative methods and systems to accelerate discoveries in human nutrition.

Contact: Interagency Committee on Human Nutrition Research, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20250, Telephone: (202) 720-2791 Web Site: https://fnic.nal.usda.gov/surveys-reports-and-research/interagency-committee-human-nutrition-research Available from the website.

Keywords: Eating behavior, Interdisciplinary approach, Nutrition, Research methodology, Strategic plans, Systems development, Work force

Rivara F, Le Menestrel S, eds; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Committee on the Biological and Psychosocial Effects of Peer Victimization: Lessons for Bullying Prevention. 2016. Preventing bullying through science, policy, and practice. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 310 pp.

Annotation: This document reports on the state of the science on the biological and psychosocial consequences of peer victimization and the risk and protective factors that either increase or decrease peer victimization behavior and consequences. Contents include information about the scope of the problem, social contexts that can either attenuate or exacerbate the effect of individual characteristics on bullying behavior, consequences of bullying behavior, preventive interventions, law and policy, and future directions.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Peer groups, Peer pressure, Policy development, Protective factors, Risk factors, Social behavior, Violence prevention

National Children's Oral Health Foundation. 2016. #MySmileMatters national youth engagement plan. Charlotte, NC: National Children's Oral Health Foundation, 11 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a model for helping adolescents and adults integrate oral health advocacy, learning, and teaching opportunities into their schools and communities. Contents include activities to increase oral health literacy by changing beliefs, activities to change oral health habits by changing behavior, and activities to affect whole populations by changing the environment. The plan also outlines steps for adolescents and youth groups to become members of the #MySmileMatters Youth Movement, a national initiative to engage adolescents in oral health and wellness.

Contact: National Children's Oral Health Foundation, 4108 Park Road, Suite 300, Charlotte, NC 28209, Telephone: (704) 350-1600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 559-9838 Fax: (704) 350-1333 E-mail: info@ncohf.org Web Site: http://www.ncohf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Behavior change, Beliefs, Community action, Community participation, Health behavior, Learning, Models, National initiatives, Oral health, Policy development, Schools, Strategic plans, Teaching, Youth

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2016. Facing addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s report on alcohol, drugs, and health. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, multiple items.

Annotation: This report reviews what is known about substance misuse and how that knowledge can be used to address substance misuse and related consequences. Contents include information and findings related to neurobiology, prevention, treatment, recovery, and health care systems. The report concludes with a vision for the future including five general messages and their implications for policy and practice, and recommendations for specific stakeholder groups. Supplementary materials such as fact sheets on specific findings and recommendations for different audiences and a toolkit for promoting the report are also available.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care systems, Medical treatment, Policy development, Public private partnerships, Substance abusers, Substance dependence, Substance use behavior, Substance use disorders, Substance use screening

Spencer A, Freda B, McGinnis T, Gottlieb L. 2016. Measuring social determinants of health among Medicaid beneficiaries: Early state lessons. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 13 pp.

Annotation: This brief explores state-based efforts to collect and use social determinants of health (SDOH) data including what data health plans and providers are required to collect. Topics include early state efforts to define SDOH and collect information; state efforts to select SDOH measures; using SDOH data at the patient and population level; challenges to collecting, sharing, and using SDOH information; and considerations for advancing SDOH measurement approaches.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Data collection, Data linkage, Environmental exposure, Environmental influences, Financing, Health behavior, Low income groups, Measures, Medicaid, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Policy development, Reimbursement, Risk assessment, Risk factors, Service delivery systems, Social conditions, Socioeconomic factors, State programs

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2015–. Parent engagement in schools. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to assist parents and school staff in working together to support and improve the learning, development, and health of children and adolescents. Contents include fact sheets for school districts and school administrators, teachers and other school staff, and parents and families. A strategy guide for state and local education agencies on selecting and implementing parent engagement strategies specific to HIV/STD prevention and a facilitator's guide for staff development are also included.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Child development, Child health, Family support, Health behavior, Learning, Parents, Protective factors, School age children, School districts, School personnel, Schools, Social support, Students, Teachers

Oklahoma State Department of Health. 2015. Good health handbook: A guide for those caring for children (rev.). Oklahoma City, OK: Oklahoma State Department of Health, 542 pp.

Annotation: This handbook provides child care programs and schools with information on health, safety, and development issues. Topics include healthy living and health promotion including oral health promotion, policies and procedures, child development and guiding children's behavior, injury prevention and infection control, guidelines for childhood injuries, managing childhood illnesses and infestations, managing chronic medical conditions and special health care needs, and child abuse. Handouts, resources, and sample forms are included. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Oklahoma State Department of Health, 1000 N.E. 10th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73117, Telephone: (405) 271-5600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 522-0203 Web Site: https://www.ok.gov/health Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child behavior, Child care, Child development, Child safety, Children, Consultation, Disease management, Health promotion, Infection control, Injuries, Injury prevention, Policy development, Resources for professionals, Special health care needs

Perry J, Kaufman B, Vasquez E. 2015. Strategic thinking report: LEND and DBP programs. Silver Spring, MD: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes findings from interviews and meetings with maternal and child (MCH) health program directors and other stakeholders about future directions for the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) and Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics (DBP) training programs. Contents include recommendations for strategic action in the following five areas: training pipelines for LEND and DBP programs; models of training and clinical care that are accessible and can be sustained; opportunities for trainees to learn and apply principles of MCH leadership training; collaboration with Title V and other partners; and policies and practices important to LEND and DBP programs, individuals with disabilities and their families, and the professionals who serve them. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1000, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 588-8252 Fax: (301) 588-2842 E-mail: aucdinfo@aucd.org Web Site: http://www.aucd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior development, Child development disorders, Collaboration, Developmental disabilities, Developmental pediatrics, Leadership, MCH training programs, Model programs, Pediatric neurology, Policy development, Strategic plans, Title V programs

First Focus. 2015. Big ideas: Pioneering change–Innovative ideas for children and families. Washington, DC: First Focus, 153 pp.

Annotation: This compilation of 14 papers outlines ways to create opportunities for families in poverty. Topics include include emerging two-generation policies, using housing rules to tackle education inequalities for minority children, the costs of raising children, implementing a child allowance program, Roth IRAs and savings accounts for children, community schools and educational equity, higher-education tax spending, coordinating health care with home visits for new families, a policy agenda to expand economic opportunity, immigration decisions and children, systems of care to address the needs of commercially sexually exploited youth, and practices and policies to reduce the burden of childhood asthma.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior change, Child health, Equal opportunities, Families, Family centered care, Intergenerational programs, Low income groups, Minority groups, Models, Organizational change, Policy development, Poverty, Service delivery, Systems development, Vulnerability, Youth

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens: Family resource brief (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find mental health care, services, and support and websites about emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens. A separate section presents websites about babies and young kids. Another lists websites for teens. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Affective disorders, Behavior development, Behavior disorders, Bibliographies, Children, Electronic publications, Emotional development, Family support services, Mental health, Psychological needs, Social behavior

Fox L, Veguilla M, Perez Binder D. 2014. Data decision-making and program-wide implementation of the Pyramid Model. Tampa, FL: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children, 33 pp. (Roadmap to effective intervention practices; no. 7)

Annotation: This document provides guidance for programs on collecting and using data when implementing the Pyramid Model, a framework for promoting the social and emotional competence of all young children including children who have persistent challenging behavior. Contents include a list of tools that can be used to ensure implementation and intervention fidelity and to determine the supports needed by professionals, children, and families. The document briefly describes each tool and provides the measurement form or information for accessing the tool.

Contact: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children, Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida, 13301 North Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, MHC2-1134, Tampa, FL 33612-3807, Telephone: (813) 974-9803 E-mail: cureton@usf.edu Web Site: http://www.challengingbehavior.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Competence, Data analysis, Data collection, Decision making, Early intervention, Emotional development, Measures, Psychosocial development, Social behavior, Young children

Dunlap G, Smith BJ, Fox L, Blase K. 2014. Roadmap to statewide implementation of the Pyramid Model. Tampa, FL: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children, 10 pp. (Roadmap to effective intervention practices; no. 6)

Annotation: This document provides a guide and suggested resources for statewide implementation of the Pyramid Model for Promoting Social Emotional Competence in Infants and Young Children. The document outlines key components of the model in the context of implementation stages (planning and installation, implementation, and scale-up and sustainability). Components include the state leadership team, master cadre for professional development, demonstration sites, behavior specialists, data and evaluation systems, and state benchmarks of quality. The document also describes measures and evaluation procedures that are tailored to the model. An accompanying document provides descriptions of the tools and how to use them.

Contact: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children, Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida, 13301 North Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, MHC2-1134, Tampa, FL 33612-3807, Telephone: (813) 974-9803 E-mail: cureton@usf.edu Web Site: http://www.challengingbehavior.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Competence, Early intervention, Emotional development, Model programs, Psychosocial development, Service delivery systems, Social behavior, Statewide planning, Systems development, Young children

Center for Health and Health Care in Schools. 2014. The impact of school-connected behavioral and emotional health interventions on student academic performance: An annotated bibliography of research literature. Washington, DC: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, 11 pp.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.