Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 18 (18 total).

National Institute of Mental Health. 2012. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. [Rev. ed.]. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Mental Health, 22 pp.

Annotation: This document offers information on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and its management, including research on medications and behavioral interventions, as well as helpful resources and educational options. Although the focus is on ADHD in children, the document also contains a section on the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD in adults. Topics include ADHD symptoms, diagnosis, causes, co-morbidities, treatment, families of children with ADHD, school for the child with ADHD, and adolescents with ADHD.

Contact: National Institute of Mental Health, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20892-9663, Telephone: (866) 615-6464 Secondary Telephone: (301) 443-8431 Fax: (301) 443-4279 E-mail: nimhinfo@nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nimh.nih.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: , Adolescents, Adults, Attention deficit disorder, Children, Diagnosis, Families, Research, School adjustment, Treatment

Leigh WA, Wheatley AL. 2009. Trends in child health 1997-2006: Assessing black-white disparities. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 24 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides information about how child health indicators vary between black children and white children. Indicators discussed include low birthweight, health status, oral health care, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, learning disability, lifetime astha diagnosis; and activity limitation.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Attention deficit disorder, Blacks, Child health, Children, Children with special health care needs, Learning disabilities, Low birthweight, Oral Health, Oral health, Racial factors, Whites

Leigh WA, Wheatley AL. 2009. Trends in child health 1997-2006: Assessing Hispanic-white disparities. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 28 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides information about how child health indicators vary between Hispanic children and white children. Indicators discussed include low birthweight, health status, oral health care, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, learning disability, lifetime asthma diagnosis; and activity limitation.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Asthma, Attention deficit disorder, Child health, Children, Children with special health care needs, Hispanic Americans, Learning disabilities, Low birthweight, Oral health, Racial factors, Whites

National Institute of Mental Health. 2009. Treatment of children with mental illness: Frequently asked questions about the treatment of mental illness in children. [Rev. ed.]. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Mental Health, 6 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet, which is geared toward parents, addresses common questions about diagnosis and treatment options for children with mental illnesses, including anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, bipolar disorders, depression, eating disorders, and schizophrenia. A list of resources for more information is included.

Contact: National Institute of Mental Health, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20892-9663, Telephone: (866) 615-6464 Secondary Telephone: (301) 443-8431 Fax: (301) 443-4279 E-mail: nimhinfo@nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nimh.nih.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 09-4702.

Keywords: Anxiety, Attention deficit disorder, Autism, Bipolar disorder, Child health, Child health, Depression, Depression, Diagnosis, Eating disorders, Mental disorders, Mental health, Schizophrenic disorders, Treatment

Soni A. 2009. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children (5-17): Use and expenditures, 2007. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5 pp. (MEPS statistical brief, no. 276)

Annotation: This statistical brief presents estimates on expenditures for and use of ambulatory care and prescribed medications to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder among children ages 5-17 in the U.S. civilian population who have not been institutionalized. The estimates are based on the Household Component of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS-HC) –- a nationally-representative longitudinal survey of families and individuals, their medical providers, and employers across the United States. Average annual estimates are shown by type of service and source of payment.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Attention deficit disorder, Child mental health, Drugs, Expenditures, Health services, Longitudinal studies, National surveys, Primary care, Statistics

Nunez-Smith M, Wolf E, Huang HM, Chen PG, Lee L, Emanuel EJ, Gross CP. 2008. Media and child and adolescent health: A systematic review. San Francisco, CA: Common Sense Media, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a comprehensive and systematic evaluation of the evidence regarding the impact of media quantity and content on the health of children and adolescents. Specifically, the report looks at seven outcomes: obesity, tobacco use, drug use, alcohol use, low academic achievement, sexual behavior, and attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity. The report objectives include summarizing the evidence on the impact of media on health, evaluating the methodological rigor of existing research, and identifying areas in need of additional study. An executive summary is also available.

Contact: Common Sense Media, 650 Townsend, Suite 375, San Francisco, CA 94103, Telephone: (415) 863-0600 Fax: (415) 863-0601 E-mail: http://www.commonsensemedia.org/contact Web Site: http://www.commonsensemedia.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption, Attention deficit disorder, Child behavior, Child health, Drug abuse, Mass media, Obesity, Research, Smoking, Substance abuse

National Institute for Health Care Management. 2008. Pediatric mental health care: Strategies to integrate early identification and treatment into primary care. [Washington, DC]: National Institute for Health Care Management,

Annotation: This webinar, held on December 4, 2009, focused on strategies to integrate early identification and treatment of mental problems and disorders into primary care. Topic include the current state of children's mental health care, using the Bright Futures Guidelines to promote mental health, an attention deficit disorder management program for children in primary care, and the South Dakota Children's Mental Health Initiative. Speakers included Nancy Chockley, founding president and CEO of the National Institute for Health Care Management (NIHCM); Kathryn Santoro, program manager at NIHCM Foundation; James M. Perrin, professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and director of the Division of General Pediatrics and the Center for Child and Adolescent Health Policy at the Massachusetts General Hospital for Children.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Attention deficit disorder, Child health, Early intervention, Health care, Health promotion, Mental health, Primary care, Programs, Service integration, South Dakota, Treatment

Rideout V. 2007. Parents, children, and media: A Kaiser Family Foundation survey. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 38 pp.

Annotation: This report is based on a national survey of 1,008 parents of children and adolescents ages 2-17, along with information gleaned from a series of focus groups held with parents across the country. The survey explores such issues as media content, media ratings and the V-Chip, media monitoring, educational media, and the Internet. The report discusses the survey methodology and provides information about survey findings in the following categories: (1) inappropriate content in the media, (2) advertising, obesity, and attention deficit disorder, (3) educational media, (4) media monitoring and influence, (5) media ratings and the V-Chip, and (6) the Internet.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Advertising, Attention deficit disorder, Child behavior, Educational materials, Focus groups, Mass media, Obesity, Parents, Surveys, World wide web

Currie J, Stabile M. 2007. Mental health in childhood and human capital. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, ca. 50 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 13217)

Annotation: This paper examines U.S. and Canadian children with symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression, conduct disorders, and other behavioral problems, with respect to future outcomes. The paper, which includes an abstract, is divided into the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) background, (3) data, (4) methods, (5) results, and (6) discussion and conclusions. References are included. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables grouped together at the end of the paper.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Attention deficit disorder, Behavior disorders, Child health, Depression, Education, Educational attainment, Income factors, Mental health

Melnyk BM, Moldenhauer Z, eds. 2006. The KySS (Keep Your Children/Yourself Safe and Secure) guide to child and adolescent mental health screening, early intervention, and health promotion. Cherry Hill, NJ: National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, 273 pp., 2 CD-ROMs.

Annotation: This book, which focuses on mental health screening and early intervention and mental health promotion for children and adolescents, covers the following topics: (1) assessing and screening for common mental health problems, (2) diagnosing, managing, and preventing mental health disorders, (3) anxiety disorders, (4) attention deficit hyperactivity disorders, (5) eating disorders, (6) grief and loss, (7) mood disorders, (8) marital separation and divorce, (9) maltreatment, (10) sexuality, (11) substance abuse, (12) violence, (13) reimbursement, and (14) brief interventions. Each chapter contains summaries, checklists, questionnaires for parents and youth in English and Spanish, information on other tools, and resources. Some chapters include DSM-IV criteria for specific problems. An index is included.

Contact: National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, 20 Brace Road, Suite 200, Cherry Hill, NJ 08034, Telephone: (856) 857-9700 Fax: (856) 857-1600 E-mail: info@napnap.org Web Site: http://www.napnap.org $50.00, pus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Anxiety, Attention deficit disorder, Child mental health, Divorce, Early intervention, Eating disorders, Grief, Health promotion, Maltreated children, Mental disorders, Prevention, Questionnaires, Reimbursement, Screening, Sexuality, Spanish language materials, Substance abuse, Violence

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2005. Helping children and youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: Systems of care. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 4 pp. (Children's mental health facts)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides basic information on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents and describes an approach to getting services and supports (called systems of care) that helps children, adolescents, and families thrive at home, in school, in the community, and throughout life. The fact sheet describes three different types of ADHD, discusses what happens after an ADHD diagnosis, defines systems of care, discusses whether systems of care are effective, and lays out the steps necessary to enroll in a system of care. A case study of an adolescent with ADHD is included, and resources for more information are provided.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: SMA-4059.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Attention deficit disorder, Case studies, Child health, Communities, Families, Family support, Health care systems, Mental health, School

Currie J, Stabile M. 2004. Child mental health and human capital accumulation: The case of ADHD. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 38 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 10435)

Annotation: This paper examines the experiences of North American children who score high on a screener for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The paper investigates why poor children appear more likely to suffer ADHD symptoms than non-poor children. The paper, which includes an abstract, describes the background and previous literature, discusses the data and methods, and offers results, a discussion, and conclusions. References are included. Statistical information is presented in tables grouped together at the end of the report. The paper includes one data appendix.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Attention deficit disorder, Child health, Hyperactivity, Low income groups, Poverty, Research, Screening

Center for School Mental Health Assistance. 2002. Empirically-supported interventions in school mental health. [Baltimore, MD]: Center for School Mental Health Assistance, 16 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide discusses the use of empirically supported interventions for school mental health programs and provides a guide to specific programs in these areas: treatments for anxiety and depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder; promotion of social and emotional competence; substance use, conduct problems, and other high-risk behaviors; and preventive interventions. The interventions are designed to be used in schools and other settings. Contact information is provided for each intervention. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center for School Mental Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, 737 West Lombard Street, Fourth Floor, Baltimore, MD 21201, Telephone: (410) 706-0980 Fax: (410) 706-0984 E-mail: csmh@psych.umaryland.edu Web Site: http://csmh.umaryland.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Anxiety, Attention deficit disorder, Child behavior, Child health, Depression, Interventions, Mental health programs, Mental health: School health programs, Prevention, Social problems, Substance abuse, Treatment

Knight JR, Frazer C, Emans SJ, eds. 2001. Bright Futures case studies for primary care clinicians: Child development and behavior. Boston, MA: Bright Futures Center for Pediatric Education in Growth and Development, Behavior, and Adolescent Health, 269 pp. (xxx)

Annotation: This manual is part of a three volume set designed to provide information to teachers about the many facets of the Bright Futures Pediatric Education Project. The first section of this manual presents case studies in child development, specifically delays in development, Down syndrome, and an atypical behavior situation. Section two focuses on the school environment: school readiness, learning disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and recurrent abdominal pain. The third section addresses case studies in physical and sexual abuse, as well as child neglect. The resources section contains sample forms with evaluation questions. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau and the Genentech Foundation for Growth and Development]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Contact Fax: xxx E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Contact for cost information. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHN100 (3 vol set.).

Keywords: Attention deficit disorder, Bright Futures, Case studies, Child behavior, Child development, Child health supervision, Child neglect, Delayed development, Diagnosis, Down syndrome, Educational materials, Hyperactivity, Learning disabilities, Physical abuse, Professional education, Program evaluation, School readiness, Sexual abuse

National Center for Health Statistics. 2000-. Summary health statistics for U. S. children: National Health Interview Survey, 19__. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, annual. (Vital and health statistics: Series 10, Data from the National Health Interview Survey)

Annotation: The purpose of this report is to provide national estimates for a broad range of health measures for the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population of children under age 18. Estimates are presented for asthma, allergies, learning disabilities, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, use of prescription medication, respondent-assessed health status, school-loss days, usual place of medical care, time since last contact with a health professional, selected health care risk factors, and time since last dental contact. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) abstract, (2) introduction, (3) methods, (4) highlights, and (5) references. Two appendices contain technical notes on methods, hypotheses tests, and lists of terms. Statistical information is presented in numerous detailed tables grouped together at the end of the report.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: DHHS (PHS) 2003-1541; 2003-1538; 2002-1526; ISBN 0-8406-0589-7.

Keywords: Allergies, Asthma, Attention deficit disorder, Child health, Dental care, Health surveys, Learning disabilities, Prescription drugs, Risk factors, School attendance, Statistics

Feagans L. 1998. Otitis media in day care: Effects on language/attention [Final report]. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University,

Annotation: This 5-year study was designed to determine whether there was a causal relationship between otitis media observed in a day care setting and developmental delays in language and attention. Otitis media is the second most frequent reason parents take their children to a physician. Although antibiotic regimens have helped to reduce the acute phase of the disease, there is no really effective therapy for the fluid that often remains in the middle ear after the acute phase is over. This fluid is associated with a mild to moderate hearing loss. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-149221.

Keywords: Attention Deficit Disorders, Audiometry, Child Care, Delayed Development, Hearing Loss, Illnesses in Child Care, Language Disorders, MCH Research, Otitis Media, Preschool Children, Research

Gabor V, Jacquart K, Salit R, Hill I. 1996. Practice guidelines and standards of care for children with special health care needs: Report and compendium. Washington, DC: Health Systems Research, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report gives information on a technical assistance project for the North Carolina Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources Division of Maternal and Child Health. The project examined practice guidelines to promote health care quality for children with special health needs as their care was expected to migrate to a Medicaid managed care system. The report includes a summary of guidelines for children with the following conditions: asthma, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, cerebral palsy, congenital deafness, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, sickle cell disease, and spina bifida. The report also identifies the sources of these guidelines. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Altarum Institute, 3520 Green Court, Suite 300, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, Telephone: (734) 302-4600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 879-6505 Fax: (734) 302-4991 Web Site: http://www.altarum.org/contact Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Attention deficit disorder, Cerebral palsy, Children with special health care needs, Cystic fibrosis, Deafness, Diabetes mellitus, Guidelines, Hyperactivity, North Carolina, Quality assurance, Sickle cell disease, Spina bifida, Standards, State health care reform, Technical assistance

Streissgut A. 1987. Prenatal Aspirin and Acetaminophen: 7-Year Follow-Up [Final report]. Seattle, WA: University of Washington,

Annotation: The purpose of this study was to examine the long-term effects of prenatal exposure to aspirin and acetaminophen using three measures of outcome in seven-year-old children: Attentional parameters; IQ scores; and height, weight, and head circumference. The study followed 531 first-born singletons whose mothers had been interviewed prenatally in 1974/75. Among the findings were: (1) Prenatal acetaminophen exposure was not significantly associated with attention, IQ score, weight, or head circumference but it was significantly associated with offspring height at seven years; and (2) prenatal aspirin exposure was associated with significantly poorer attention and lower IQ scores, but not with decrements in height, weight, or head circumference. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB88-173687.

Keywords: Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Attention Deficit Disorder, Intelligence tests, School-age children

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.