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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 7 (7 total).

Before the First Tooth. [2017]. Rx: Bring this with you to your next appointment [Prescription referral form]. Portland, ME: Before the First Tooth, 1 p.

Annotation: This referral form for health professionals to fill out provides information that pregnant women can bring to their next dental appointment. The form includes blanks to fill in the woman’s name, date of birth, estimated delivery date, and known allergies and boxes to check indicating what types of oral health care are acceptable for the woman to receive and whether there are any precautions to note. Also included are boxes to check indicating pain medications and antibiotics that are safe for the woman. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: From the First Tooth / Before the First Tooth, c/o MaineHealth, 110 Free Street, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 662-6296 E-mail: info@fromthefirsttooth.org Web Site: http://www.fromthefirsttooth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Antibiotics, Drugs, Oral health Dental care, Pregnant women

Illinois Department of Public Health. 2017. Antiobiotic stewardship toolkit for dental providers. Sringfield, IL: Illinois Department of Public Health, 33 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit provides dentists with resources to support judicious use of antibiotics in outpatient settings as part of the Illinois Precious Drugs & Scary Bugs Campaign. The toolkit is organized around four core elements set forth by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: commitment, action for policy and practice, tracking and reporting, and education and expertise.

Contact: Illinois Department of Public Health, Division of Oral Health, 535 West Jefferson Street, Third Floor, Springfield, IL 62761, Telephone: (217) 785-4899 Secondary Telephone: (800) 547-0466 Fax: (217) 524-4201 Web Site: http://www.dph.illinois.gov/topics-services/prevention-wellness/oral-health

Keywords: Antibiotics, Illinois, Oral health, Prescription drugs, Public awareness campaigns, Dentists, State programs

Illinois Department of Public Health. 2017. Precious drugs and scary bugs: Antibiotic stewardship toolkit for dental providers. Springfield, IL: Illinois Department of Public Health, 33 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit provides Illinois dentists with resources to support appropriate antibiotic prescribing as part of the Illinois Precious Drugs & Scary Bugs Campaign. The toolkit is organized around four core elements of outpatient antibiotic stewardship: (1) commitment—demonstrate dedication to optimizing antibiotic prescribing and patient safety, (2) action for policy and practice—implement a practice change to improve antibiotic prescribing, (3) tracking and reporting—monitor antibiotic-prescribing practices, and (4) education and expertise—provide patients and health professionals with educational resources. Resources for more information are included.

Contact: Illinois Department of Public Health, 525-535 West Jefferson Street, Springfield, IL 60603, Web Site: http://www.dph.illinois.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: , Antibiotics, Illinois, Oral health, Public awareness campaigns, Resource materials, State initiatives

Miler GE, Carroll WA. 2005. Trends in children's antibiotic use: 1996 to 2001. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 22 pp. (MEPS research findings; no. 23)

Annotation: This report uses nationally representative data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) to examine antibiotic use by U.S. children for the years 1996-2001. The report provides information about MEPS and discusses finding in the followings areas: (1) overall trends in antibiotic use, (2) percentage of children who use antibiotics, (3) average number of prescriptions, and (4) trends and differences in treatment of otitis media. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. The report includes one technical appendix that discusses survey design, definitions, sample design and accuracy of estimates, rounding, and standard error tables. A summary, conclusions, and references are included.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 05-0020.

Keywords: Antibiotics, Child health, Data, Otitis media, Prescription drugs, Research, Trends

Carroll WA, Miller GE. [2004]. Trends in antibiotic use among U.S. children aged 0 to 4 years, 1996-2000. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 7 pp. (MEPS statistical brief; no. 35)

Annotation: This statistical brief presents data from the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey -- Household Component (MEPS-HC) on antibiotic drug use by children from birth through age 4 for the calendar years 1996 through 2000. The brief discusses highlights of the survey, findings, and the data source. The brief also provides information about MEPS-HC. Statistical information is presented in figures at the end of the brief.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Antibiotics, Children, Infants, Statistics, Surveys

Escobar G. 1999. "Watchful Waiting" Versus "Antibiotics A.S.A.P.": [Final report]. Oakland, CA: Kaiser Foundation Research Institute, 72 pp.

Annotation: The study sought to define guidelines for observation and care of suspected neonatal bacterial infection and determine which infections can be managed without antibiotic therapy. The study population consisted of all babies born at six Kaiser Permanente (KP) facilities from October 9, 1995, to October 31, 1996, some 2,000 to 4,000 newborns. Guidelines were developed by establishing predictor-outcome relationships, using data from babies who were not treated within 6 hours of their first evaluation. These guidelines permit an inference as to which babies could have antibiotic therapy deferred safely ("watchful waiting"). [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2000-106922.

Keywords: Antibiotics, MCH Research, Newborn infants, Pregnant women, Research

Davis S. 1991. Intravenous Antibiotic Therapy in Cystic Fibrosis: Home versus Hospital [Final report]. New Orleans, LA: Tulane University School of Medicine, 121 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this study was to compare two treatment locations—hospital and hospital/home—for use of intravenous antibiotics on patients who have cystic fibrosis and who experience acute pulmonary exacerbations. The study compared the safety, efficacy, cost, and psychosocial effects of the two places of treatment. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-136225.

Keywords: Antibiotics, Chronically Ill, Cystic Fibrosis, Families, Inhalation Therapy, Intravenous Therapy, Nutritional Therapy, Physical Therapy, Psychological Testing

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.