Skip Navigation

Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 5 (5 total).

San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project. n.d.. Including all of us: Caring for children with special needs in early childhood settings—Manual for child care providers. San Diego, CA: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 218 pp.

Annotation: This manual was developed to accompany an 8-hour class. It introduces the concept of mainstreaming and relates it to the principles of early childhood education and best practice guidelines for caring for children with special needs. Module one includes sections on the importance of working with families, ethical issues, laws protecting children with special needs, typical vs. atypical development, how children learn, suggestions for working with parents are included, and diversity resources. Module two deals with motor development and concludes with a bibliography and references. Module three covers social-emotional development and behavioral issues. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 6505 Alvarado Road, Suite 108, San Diego, CA 92120, Telephone: (619) 594-4373 Available in libraries.

Keywords: Americans With Disabilities Act, Child behavior, Child care, Child development, Children with special health care needs, Developmental disabilities, Ethics, Families, Learning, Legislation, Mainstreaming, Motor development, Parents, Psychosocial development, Special education

Child Care Law Center. 2009. Questions and answers about the Americans with Disabilities Act: A quick reference for child care providers (Upd. ed.). San Francisco, CA: Child Care Law Center, 8 pp.

Annotation: This quick reference describes the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) -- including those in the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 -- that are relevant to child care providers and programs. It defines what the ADA is and explains who is protected by it; whether or not specific child care programs are required to achieve compliance; and the types of child care policies, procedures, and accommodations the ADA requires. It is available in English, Chinese, and Spanish.

Contact: Child Care Law Center, 221 Pine Street, Third Floor, San Francisco, CA 94104, Telephone: (415) 394-7144 Fax: (415) 394-7140 E-mail: info@childcarelaw.org Web Site: http://www.childcarelaw.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Americans with Disabilities Act, Asian language materials, Child care, Children with special health care needs, Federal legislation, Inclusion, Spanish language materials

National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities. 1994. Collective perspectives on issues affecting learning disabilities: Position papers and statements. Austin, TX: Pro-Ed, 110 pp.

Annotation: This monograph presents a collection of position papers of the National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities (NJCLD), a national committee of representatives of organizations committed to the education and welfare of individuals with learning disabilities. Each paper provides a response to national issues concerning learning disabilities. In addition to the papers, the monograph provides a comprehensive overview of the NJCLD—its history, primary objectives, and the procedures used to accomplish its goals.

Contact: Pro-Ed, 8700 Shoal Creek Boulevard, Austin, TX 78757-6897, Telephone: (512) 451-3246 Secondary Telephone: (800) 897-3202 Fax: 512-451-8542 E-mail: q@proedinc.com Web Site: http://www.proedinc.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-89079-534-7.

Keywords: Americans With Disabilities Act, Education, Learning disabilities, Service delivery

San Diego State University, Graduate School of Public Health, Division of Maternal and Child Health. 1994. Starting point—Children are children first: Mainstreaming children in a child care setting. [San Diego, CA: San Diego State University, Graduate School of Public Health, Division of Maternal and Child Health?], 1 videotape (30 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape educates child care providers about requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act and the needs of children with special health needs, the benefits of inclusion for both children with special needs and the typically developing, and how to build a successful inclusion program. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, California Childcare Health Program, San Francisco, CA 94143, Telephone: (415) 476-4695 Web Site: http://www.ucsfchildcarehealth.org Price unknown.

Keywords: Americans with Disabilities Act, Audiovisual materials, Child care, Children with special health care needs, Inclusion, Videotapes

Wright TJ, Leung P. 1993. Meeting the unique needs of minorities with disabilities: A report to the President and the Congress. Washington, DC: National Council on Disability, 103 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes proceedings of a conference on minorities with disabilities cosponsored by the National Council on Disability and Jackson State University in Jackson, Mississippi on May 6-7, 1992. It also presents testimony from an October 21, 1992 National Council public hearing in San Francisco, California that focused on how minorities with disabilities are faring under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Recommendations of participants from both National Council events are included in the report.

Contact: National Council on Disability, 1331 F Street, N.W., Suite 850, Washington, DC 20004-1107, Telephone: (202) 272-2004 Secondary Telephone: (202) 272-2074 Fax: (202) 272-2022 E-mail: ncd@ncd.gov Web Site: http://www.ncd.gov/ Available at no charge.

Keywords: Americans with Disabilities Act, Federal legislation, Minority groups, Special health care needs

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.