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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (77 total).

Fond M, Kendall-Taylor N, Volmert A, Pineau MG, L’Hôte E. 2017. Seeing the spectrum: Mapping the gaps between expert and public understandings of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in Manitoba. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute, 49 pp.

Annotation: This report presents an empirically-based framing strategy for communicating about fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Contents include a set of principles reflecting expert understanding of what fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is, how alcohol affects fetal development, why women consume alcohol while pregnant, what the effects of FASD are, and how FASD can be prevented and addressed. The report also describes shared but implicit understandings, assumptions, and patterns of reasoning that shape how the public thinks about FASD, points at which expert and public understandings overlap and diverge, and key challenges in communicating about FASD. Recommendations are included.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Beliefs, Communication, Culturally competent services, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fetal development, Prevention services, Research, Trauma care

American College of Nurse-Midwives and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [2015]. Alcohol and pregnancy: Tips on why and how to stop drinking. Silver Spring, MD: American College of Nurse-Midwives, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource for pregnant women provides information about drinking alcohol during pregnancy and the risk of fetal alcohol syndrome disorders (FASDs). Topics include some of the behavioral and intellectual disabilities of people with FASDs, what women can do to help themselves stop drinking alcohol, and related organizational resources.

Contact: American College of Nurse-Midwives, 8403 Colesville Road, Suite 1550, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (240) 485-1800 Secondary Telephone: (888) MID-WIFE (643-9433) Fax: (240) 485-1818 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.midwife.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Educational materials, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Pregnant women, Prevention, Substance use

Levi J, Segal LM, De Biasi A, Martin A. 2015. Reducing teen substance misuse: What really works. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 99 pp.

Annotation: This report includes state-by-state youth drug overdose death rates and rankings, and a report card for how well states scored on 10 key indicators of leading evidence-based policies and programs that can improve the wellbeing of children and youth and have been connected with preventing and reducing misuse of alcohol, tobacco or other drugs.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Drug use attitudes, Drug use behavior, Health education, Health policy, Prevention programs, Protective factors, Risk factors, Smoking, Tobacco use, Young adults

University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit. 2015. The Parent-Child Assistance Program (PCAP): Prevention & intervention with high-risk mothers and their children. Seattle, WA: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brochure describes a program to prevent and/or reduce the risk of maternal alcohol and drug abuse by providing home visitation and intervention over a 3-year period by trained and supervised case managers. Contents include a description of the program goals, approach, client outcomes, and eligibility criteria. Topics include helping mothers build and maintain healthy independent family lives, assuring that children are in safe and stable homes, and preventing future births of alcohol and drug-exposed children.

Contact: University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit, 180 Nickerson Street, Suite 309, Seattle, WA 98109, Telephone: (206) 543-7155 Fax: (206) 685-2903 Contact E-mail: granttm@uw.edu Web Site: http://depts.washington.edu/fadu Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Case management, Child safety, Drug abuse, Family support programs, Fetal alcohol effects, High risk children, High risk mothers, Home visiting, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Program descriptions, Referrals, Risk factors, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Washington, Women

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Tobacco, alcohol, and substance use during preconception and pregnancy: Professional resource brief (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Tobacco, alcohol, and substance use in children and adolescents:Professional resource brief (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Minnesota Department of Health. 2013. Infant mortality in Minnesota: A summary of statistics, activities, and past work group recommendations-Region V Infant Mortality Summit. [St. Paul, MN]: Minnesota Department of Health, 35 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a summit in March 2013 to address the infant mortality problem in Minnesota, particularly racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality, and to lay a foundation for the development of a comprehensive plan by the Minnesota Department of Health and its partners to further reduce infant mortality. Section 1 provides an overview of infant mortality in Minnesota by putting into context the significant racial and ethnic infant mortality disparities that exist in the state. Sections 2 and 3 highlight infant mortality rates by selected infant and maternal characteristics. Section 4 addresses selected maternal behaviors linked to infant mortality such as smoking and alcohol consumption. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Drug use during pregnancy, Ethnic factors, Infant death, Infant mortality, Minnesota, Prenatal influences, Racial factors, Risk factors, State initiatives

Mocan N, Raschke C, Unel B. 2013. The impact of mothers' earnings on health inputs and infant health. National Bureau of Economic Research, 54 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 19434)

Annotation: This paper investigates the impact of mothers’ earnings on birth weight and gestational age of infants. It also analyzes the impact of earnings on mothers’ consumption of prenatal medical care, and their propensity to smoke and drink during pregnancy. Study methodology and findings are described.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Pregnancy outcome, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Smoking during pregnancy, Socioeconomic factors, Working mothers

American Society of Addiction Medicine. 2011. Public policy statement on women, alcohol and other drugs, and pregnancy. Chevy Chase, MD: American Society of Addiction Medicine, 8 pp.

Annotation: This paper addresses aspects of substance abuse and addiction in women of childbearing age, with an emphasis on the potential adverse effects of substance use and substance use disorders during pregnancy. The paper details mechanisms of harm from alcohol and other substances during pregnancy. Policy recommendations are included.

Contact: American Society of Addiction Medicine, 4601 North Park Avenue, Upper Arcade, Suite 101, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, Telephone: (301) 656-3920 Fax: (301) 656-3815 E-mail: email@asam.org Web Site: http://www.asam.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Infant health, Public policy, Substance abuse, Substance abusing pregnant women, Women's health

Wisconsin Department of Health Services. 2010. Oral cancer and oral health. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Department of Health and Social Services, Oral Health Consultant, 2 pp. (Oral health in Wisconsin: A fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses oral cancer as a public health issue and describes causes and symptoms. Information about oral and pharyngeal cancer incidence and mortality rates in Wisconsin and the state's tobacco prevention and control program is also included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Oral Health Program, Division of Public Health, P.O. Box 2659, Madison, WI 53701-2659, Fax: (608) 266-3483 Web Site: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/oral-health/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption behavior, Consumer education, Disease prevention, Educational materials, Epidemiology, Oral cancer, Oral health, State programs, Statistics, Tobacco use, Wisconsin

ReachOut.com. 2010. We can help us [suicide prevention campaign]. ReachOut.com,

Annotation: This Web site for adolescents, created by the organization Reach Out, is designed to help adolescents cope with mental health problems and to help prevent adolescent suicide. The site presents information about issues such as suicide and self-harm; drugs, alcohol, and tobacco; relationships; loss and grief; and sexuality. Stories told by adolescents in their own voices are also included, and opportunities for adolescents to share their own stories and become involved with Reach Out are provided. Resources for getting help and support are included, as well.

Contact: Reach Out, Inspire USA Foundation, 657 Mission Street, Suite 507, San Francisco, CA 94105, E-mail: info@inspireusafoundation.org Web Site: http://us.reachout.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy Grief, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Alcohol consumption, Friendships, HIgh risk adolescents, Mental health, Prevention, Relationships, Resource materials, Substance abuse, Suicide prevention, Tobacco use, Violence prevention

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals. 2010. Counseling patients on preconception care: Folate and beyond. (Upd. ed.). Washington, DC: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 2 pp. (What you need to know)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about counseling women on preconception care, and in particular on folate intake. The fact sheet discusses preconception counseling as lifelong health promotion; neural tube defects, folate, and folic acid; folate intake and folic acid supplementation; environmental contaminants; and alcohol consumption during pregnancy. A list of folate and folic acid sources is included, along with recommendations.

Contact: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 1901 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 466-3825 E-mail: arhp@arhp.org Web Site: http://www.arhp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Counseling, Environmental exposure, Folic acid, Health promotion, Neural tube defects, Pregnancy, Prenatal care, Prevention, Women's health

Womack L, Sappenfield WM. 2010. Preconception health: An issue for every woman of childbearing age in Florida—Florida's preconception health indicator report. Tallahassee, FL: Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Family and Community Health, 1 v.

Annotation: This report looks at preconception health among Florida's women of childbearing age. The report covers 10 different health areas (general health status and life satisfaction, social determinants of health, health care, reproductive health and family planning, tobacco and alcohol use, nutrition and physical activity, mental health, emotional and social support, chronic conditions, and infections) and examines how Florida compares to the United States, compares over time, and compares among different socioe-demographic groups.

Contact: Florida Department of Health, 4052 Bald Cypress Way, Tallahassee, FL 32399, Telephone: (850) 245-4147 Fax: (850) 487-4574 Web Site: http://www.doh.state.fl.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Family planning, Tobacco use, Florida, Health care, Infections, Mental health, Nutrition, Physical activity, Preconception care, Reproductive heath, Social support, State surveys, Women's health

National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. 2010. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (upd. ed.). [Rockville, Md]: National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). The fact sheet discusses progress in understanding, preventing, and treating the problem since alcohol's ability to cause birth defects was first recognized over three decades ago. Steps for health professionals and women who are pregnant or who are considering becoming pregnant to take to prevent FASD are provided. Research geared toward better preventing and treating FASD in the future is also discussed.

Contact: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, , 5635 Fishers Lane, MSC 9304, Bethesda, MD 20892-9304, Telephone: (301) 443-3860 Fax: (301) 780-1726 E-mail: NIAAAweb-r@exchange.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.niaaa.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Birth injuries, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Infant health, Prevention, Reproductive heath, Research, Treatment, Trends

Rosen Publishing Online. 2009. Teen health and wellness: Real life, real answers . New York, NY: Rosen Publishing Online,

Annotation: This Web site provides students with curricular support and self-help on topics including diseases, drugs, alcohol, nutrition, fitness, mental health, diversity, family life, and more. Users can subscribe for a fee or use a 3-day free trial. Sample articles on anorexia nervosa, asthma, and decision making are available.

Contact: Rosen Publishing Group, 29 East 21st Street, New York, NY 10010, Telephone: (800) 237-9932 Fax: (888) 436-4643 Web Site: http://www.rosenpublishing.com/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Alcohol consumption, Drug use, Eating disorders, Families, Food, Grief, Mental health, Nutrition, Relationships, Safety, World Wide Web

FASD Regional Training Centers, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. [2008]. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: Competency-based curriculum development guide for medical and allied health education and practice. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ca. 280 pp., 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: This purpose of this curriculum development guide is to enhance the knowledge and skills of health care providers to recognize and prevent fetal alcohol spectrum (FAS) disorders by aiding in the development of educational programs and materials. The guide is organized by three types of learning outcomes: competencies, learning goals, and learning objectives, allowing educators or trainers to select goals and objectives appropriate for participants' learning needs and skill levels, along with university or organization criteria. Chapter contents include seven competency topics: foundation; screening and brief interventions; models of addiction; biological effects of alcohol on the fetus; screening, diagnosis, and assessment of FAS; treatment across the lifespan for persons with FASDs; and ethical, legal, and policy issues.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, CD-ROMs, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fetal development, Prenatal addiction, Prenatal care, Professional education, Resources for professionals, Screening, Substance abusing pregnant women

March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. 2008. Drinking alcohol during pregnancy. [White Plains, NY]: March of Dimes,

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about the risks associated with infant physical and mental development when drinking alcohol during pregnancy. Topics also include defining fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and associated disorders, drinking alcohol while breastfeading, what is being done to prevent and treat FAS, and resources to get help to stop drinking alcohol.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Child health, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Infant health, Prevention, Treatment

Eaton DK, Kann L, Kinchen S, Ross J, Hawkins Harris, WA, Lowery R, McManus T, Chyen D, Shanklin S, Lim C, Grunbaum J, Wechsler H. 2006. Youth risk behavior surveillance: United States, 2005. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 55(SS-5):1-96,

Annotation: This report on youth risk behavior surveillance summarizes data from the 2005 national Youth Risk Behavior survey and trends during 1991-2005 in selected risk behaviors. Data from 40 state surveys and 21 local surveys are also included. The report describes the study methods, presents results, and offers a discussion and conclusion. Extensive tables and charts present statistical findings. References are included.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Alcohol, Behavior, Dietary practices, Drug use, HIV, Helmets, Injuries, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fighting, Prevention programs, Risk factors, Seat belts, Sexual behavior, Statistics, Suicide, Tobacco, Unintentional injuries, Weapons, Weight management

Fogerty S, Finkelstein N. 2006. Alcohol Screening Assessment in Pregnancy (ASAP2) Project: Final report. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, 334 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This report focuses on the Alcohol Screening Assessment in Pregnancy (ASAP2) project during the period October 1,2002, through September 30, 2005.The purpose of this project was to build on the success of the original Massachusetts ASAP Project (ASAP1) by addressing lessons learned and expanding the project to include two additional screening times during pregnancy, futher development of brief intervention protocols and tools, and patient follow-up procedures. The report , which includes an abstract, is divided into the following sections: (1) purpose of the project, (2) goals and objectives, (3) methodology, (4) evaluation, (5) results and outcomes, (6) publications and products, (7) dissemination and utilization of results, (8) future plans and follow-up, and (9) type and amount of support and resources needed to replicate. References are included. The report includes seven appendices, which encompass a pregnancy questionnaire written in several languages, screening questions, flow charts, a screening tool, marketing materials, a list of ASAP2 providers, and evaluation materials. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Assessment, Final reports, Intervention, Massachusetts, Pregnant women, Screening, Substance abuse

U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. 2006. Partnership to Prevent Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Public education program manual. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, 118 pp., plus 2 CD-ROMs.

Annotation: The print and CD editions of this program manual contain pretested research-based plans, strategies, and communications tools to develop public awareness about the dangers of alcohol consumption to the developing fetus. Chapter contents include partnership mobilization and program planning, provider involvement, materials dissemination, program evaluation, and pilot program descriptions. Appendices include materials and images, a glossary of terms, contact information, and references. The CD edition also provides four case studies that describe how the program was implemented and adapted by four pilot communities; links directly to Web-based resources; and provides PDF files of the communications tools. The CD supplement provides production source sfiles for the communications tools to allow graphic designers and commercial printers to create additional materials.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available at no charge. Document Number: HHS Pub. No. SMA-4013.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, CD-ROMs, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Pregnant women, Program development, Public awareness materials, Spanish language materials, Training materials

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.