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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (112 total).

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d.. Alcohol: Your child and drugs. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 1 p. (Teen health brochures)

Annotation: This brochure explains the developmental damage that can occur to adolescents from alcohol and emphasizes parent-child communication as one of the best ways of preventing this problem.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $15.00 for 100 copies, members; $20.00, nonmembers. Minimum order: 100 copies.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Alcohol abuse, Communication

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2018. Medicaid coverage of medication-assisted treatment for alcohol and opioid use disorders and of medication for the reversal of opioid overdose. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 113 pp.

Annotation: This report presents summary information on Medicaid coverage and financing of medications to treat alcohol and opioid use disorders (MAT). It discusses issues including prior authorization, innovative approaches to financing and delivering MAT, state considerations for covering MAT (including efficacy, costs, regulations, and policies), and innovative models and best practices.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: HHS SMA-18-5093 .

Keywords: Alcohol dependence, Drugs, Health care financing, Medicaid, Opiates, Substance abuse treatment

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2017. Focus on prevention: Strategies and programs to prevent substance use. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 59 pp.

Annotation: This guide aims to help groups and communities move from concerns about abuse of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs to practical ways to get the word out about prevention. It provides a brief discussion and starting points for these focus topics: the strategic prevention framework, prevention theory, risk and protection, community needs, strategies that work, issues and audiences, community partners, connecting with your audience, social marketing, media and social media, and evaluation. A suggested event timeline and sample materials are provided to help develop a successful news conference, and a list of substance abuse prevention resources is included. A Spanish language version is also available from the publisher.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Single copies available at no charge. Document Number: DHHS Pub. no. (SMA) 10-4120.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Communities, Drug abuse, Evaluation, Media campaigns, Prevention, Protective factors, Risk factors, Smoking, Spanish language materials

University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit. 2015. The Parent-Child Assistance Program (PCAP): Prevention & intervention with high-risk mothers and their children. Seattle, WA: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brochure describes a program to prevent and/or reduce the risk of maternal alcohol and drug abuse by providing home visitation and intervention over a 3-year period by trained and supervised case managers. Contents include a description of the program goals, approach, client outcomes, and eligibility criteria. Topics include helping mothers build and maintain healthy independent family lives, assuring that children are in safe and stable homes, and preventing future births of alcohol and drug-exposed children.

Contact: University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit, 180 Nickerson Street, Suite 309, Seattle, WA 98109, Telephone: (206) 543-7155 Fax: (206) 685-2903 Contact E-mail: granttm@uw.edu Web Site: http://depts.washington.edu/fadu Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Case management, Child safety, Drug abuse, Family support programs, Fetal alcohol effects, High risk children, High risk mothers, Home visiting, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Program descriptions, Referrals, Risk factors, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Washington, Women

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration. 2013. Talk. They hear you.. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration, multiple items.

Annotation: These campaign resources are designed to increase parents' awareness of the prevalence and risk of underage drinking among children and adolescents ages 9 to 15; equip parents with the knowledge, skills, and confidence to prevent underage drinking; and increase parents' actions to prevent underage drinking. Contents include fact sheets, character backstories, and a video. A style guide for adapting the campaign and its key messages to organizational outreach efforts, campaign identity templates, media and promotional tools, customizable parent resources, and social medial tools are also available from the website.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol abuse, Children, National initiatives, Public awareness campaigns, Substance abuse prevention

Dworsky A, Napolitano L, Barisik E, Reddy S, Simon M. 2013. The Demoiselle-2-Femme (D2F) pregnancy prevention program evaluation: Findings from the first baseline survey. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a baseline survey completed by 241 girls, primarily African American, in grade 9 through 11 who are participating in a federally funded evaluation of the Demoiselle-2-Femme signature after-school program in Chicago, Illinois. The purpose of the evaluation is to estimate the effects of program participation on a number of key behavioral outcomes, including sexual activity, unprotected sex, and adolescent pregnancy. The report presents background; describes the program; and discusses study design and methods; student characteristics; relationships with adults; attitudes, feelings, and knowledge about sexual behavior; sexual behavior and prior pregnancy; dating violence; tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use; and educational expectations.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent females, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Alcohol consumption behavior, Blacks, Community programs, Dating, Educational attainment, Illinois, Interpersonal violence, Marijuana, Prevention, Relationships, Smoking, Substance abuse

Murphey D, Vaughn B, Barry M, Terzian M. 2012. Alcohol use. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 6 pp. (Adolescent health highlight)

Annotation: This report summarizes alcohol use among adolescents in the United States. It includes statistics on alcohol consumption among students by grade (8 through 12) and compares alcohol use among adolescents between 1976 and 2011. The report also examines group differences in alcohol consumption; factors that influence alcohol abuse and dependence; media promotion of drinking; and the prevention of underage drinking. Illustrated figures indicate trends such as the percentage of students who report driving and drinking and the percentage of students who report binge drinking, by grade, between 1976-2011.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website. Document Number: Pub. no. 2012-34.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Alcohol abuse, Data, Statistics, Trends

Kolander CA, Ballard D, Chandler C. 2011. Contemporary women's health: Issues for today and the future (4th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill, 462 pp.

Annotation: Presented in five parts, this textbook for health and community services professionals and the general public focuses on women's health issues throughout the life cycle with each chapter including a summary, review questions, resource listings and references. Contents include: pt. 1. Foundations of women's health : Introducing women's health ; Becoming a wise consumer ; Developing a healthy lifestyle -- pt. 2. Mental and emotional wellness : Enhancing emotional well-being ; Managing the stress of life -- pt. 3. Sexual and relational wellness : Building healthy relationships ; Exploring women's sexuality ; Designing your reproductive life plan ; Preventing abuse against women -- pt. 4. Contemporary lifestyle and social issues : Eating well ; Keeping fit ; Using alcohol responsibly ; Making wise decisions about tobacco, caffeine, and drugs -- pt. 5. Communicable and chronic conditions : Preventing and controlling infectious diseases ; Preventing and controlling chronic health conditions ; Reducing your risk of cancer.

Contact: McGraw-Hill Companies, PO Box 182604, Columbus, OH 43272, Telephone: (877) 833-5524 Fax: (614) 759-3749 E-mail: customer.service@mcgraw-hill.com Web Site: http://www.mcgraw-hill.com $72.80. Document Number: ISBN 0-8151-0626-2.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alternative medicine, Behavior modification, Caffeine, Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Communicable diseases, Consumer education, Contraceptives, Depression, Developmental stages, Domestic abuse, Drug abuse, Eating disorders, Gynecology, Holistic health, Interpersonal relations, Life cycle, Lifestyle, Nutrition, Parenting, Pregnancy, Self esteem, Smoking, Stress management, Weight management, Women's health

QEV Analytics. 2011. The importance of family dinners. New York, NY: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 19 pp. (No. 7)

Annotation: This report examines the relationship between family dinners and specific characteristics that increase or diminish the likelihood that an adolescent will smoke, drink, or use illicit drugs. The following topics are discussed: (1) family dinners and adolescent substance-abuse risk, (2) family dinners and stress, boredom, and academic performance, (3) family dinners and smoking, drinking, and using illicit drugs.

Contact: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 633 Third Avenue, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 841-5200 Fax: (212) 956-8020 Web Site: http://www.casacolumbia.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Alcohol consumption, Families, Illicit drugs, Smoking, Stress, Substance abuse

Weiss E. 2011. Paying later: The high costs of failing to invest in young children. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States and Partnership for America's Economic Success, 6 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This policy brief is intended to help policymakers and the public evaluate the consequences of funding decisions that relate to supporting healthy early childhood development. The brief also estimates resources that our nation could redirect to more cost-effective policies in the future. The brief outlines the average lifetime costs of poor outcomes such as child abuse, adolescent pregnancy, dropping out of school, and substance and alcohol abuse; compares the costs of investing in young children now vs paying for problems that occur later; and discusses costs and benefits from a public policy perspective.

Contact: Partnership for America's Economic Success, 1025 F Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 E-mail: info@partnershipforsuccess.org Web Site: http://www.PartnershipforSuccess.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Alcohol abuse, Child abuse, Costs, Crime, Early childhood development, Financing, Prevention, Public policy, School dropouts, Substance abuse

National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. 2011. Adolescent substance use: America's no. 1 public health problem. New York, NY: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 406 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about adolescent alcohol consumption and substance abuse, including the abuse of prescription drugs and illegal drugs. The report explains the problem and discusses its magnitude, consequences, messages that promote adolescent substance abuse, adolescent perceptions and expectations,factors that compound or reduce the risk of adolescent substance abuse and addiction, prevention approaches and barriers to improvement, and treatment.

Contact: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 633 Third Avenue, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 841-5200 Fax: (212) 956-8020 Web Site: http://www.casacolumbia.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol dependence, Alcohol intoxication, Drug addiction, Health promotion, Mass media, Prevention, Substance abuse, Treatment

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. 2011. Alcohol screening and brief intervention for youth: A practitioner's guide. Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 40 pp.

Annotation: This guide for primary care health professionals provides a simple, empirically derived tool for identifying children and adolescents ages 9-18 at risk for alcohol-related problems. The guide also explains why it is important to screen for such problems and how the tool helps in doing so. A pocket guide and algorithm are also available from the website.

Contact: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, , 5635 Fishers Lane, MSC 9304, Bethesda, MD 20892-9304, Telephone: (301) 443-3860 Fax: (301) 780-1726 E-mail: NIAAAweb-r@exchange.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.niaaa.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol dependence, Alcohol intoxication, Child attitudes, Adolescent attitudes, Child behavior, Child health, Continuing education, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Intervention, Prevention, Primary care, Screening

American Society of Addiction Medicine. 2011. Public policy statement on women, alcohol and other drugs, and pregnancy. Chevy Chase, MD: American Society of Addiction Medicine, 8 pp.

Annotation: This paper addresses aspects of substance abuse and addiction in women of childbearing age, with an emphasis on the potential adverse effects of substance use and substance use disorders during pregnancy. The paper details mechanisms of harm from alcohol and other substances during pregnancy. Policy recommendations are included.

Contact: American Society of Addiction Medicine, 4601 North Park Avenue, Upper Arcade, Suite 101, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, Telephone: (301) 656-3920 Fax: (301) 656-3815 E-mail: email@asam.org Web Site: http://www.asam.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Infant health, Public policy, Substance abuse, Substance abusing pregnant women, Women's health

DeSimone JS. 2010. Binge drinking and sex in high school. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 35 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 16132)

Annotation: This paper estimates the impact of binge drinking on sexual activity among a nationally representative sample of high school students during the 1990s and 2000s. It includes a discussion of the data used in the research from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBS) -- administrated every odd year since 1991 -- and the results of the data analysis. Tables present control variable definitions and means, together with data that correlates binge drinking with sexuality activity, birth control use, and other variables.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Data, Data analysis, High school students, National surveys, Risk taking, Sexual behavior

ReachOut.com. 2010. We can help us [suicide prevention campaign]. ReachOut.com,

Annotation: This Web site for adolescents, created by the organization Reach Out, is designed to help adolescents cope with mental health problems and to help prevent adolescent suicide. The site presents information about issues such as suicide and self-harm; drugs, alcohol, and tobacco; relationships; loss and grief; and sexuality. Stories told by adolescents in their own voices are also included, and opportunities for adolescents to share their own stories and become involved with Reach Out are provided. Resources for getting help and support are included, as well.

Contact: Reach Out, Inspire USA Foundation, 657 Mission Street, Suite 507, San Francisco, CA 94105, E-mail: info@inspireusafoundation.org Web Site: http://us.reachout.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy Grief, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Alcohol consumption, Friendships, HIgh risk adolescents, Mental health, Prevention, Relationships, Resource materials, Substance abuse, Suicide prevention, Tobacco use, Violence prevention

Nunez-Smith M, Wolf E, Huang HM, Chen PG, Lee L, Emanuel EJ, Gross CP. 2008. Media and child and adolescent health: A systematic review. San Francisco, CA: Common Sense Media, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a comprehensive and systematic evaluation of the evidence regarding the impact of media quantity and content on the health of children and adolescents. Specifically, the report looks at seven outcomes: obesity, tobacco use, drug use, alcohol use, low academic achievement, sexual behavior, and attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity. The report objectives include summarizing the evidence on the impact of media on health, evaluating the methodological rigor of existing research, and identifying areas in need of additional study. An executive summary is also available.

Contact: Common Sense Media, 650 Townsend, Suite 375, San Francisco, CA 94103, Telephone: (415) 863-0600 Fax: (415) 863-0601 E-mail: http://www.commonsensemedia.org/contact Web Site: http://www.commonsensemedia.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption, Attention deficit disorder, Child behavior, Child health, Drug abuse, Mass media, Obesity, Research, Smoking, Substance abuse

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Center for Excellence. 2008. Creating hope for women in recovery: A web guide to planning an FASD summit. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 77 pp.

Annotation: This guide is a reference to help communities conceptualize, plan, facilitate, and convene a successful Women in Recovery summit to bring greater awareness to fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). The Summit background, overview, and framework presented in the guide provide the basis for a focus on the effects of alcohol on unborn children and provide a context for the need to support women in recovery and for the need to educate state and local policymakers. The guide describes how to plan and convene the Summit; how to develop the agenda; how to plan the logistics; and how to market and evaluate the Summit. Included is a list of national, federal, state, and online resources related to FASD. Appendices include a planning checklist, a sample agenda, and sample letters, evaluation forms, and a Summit press release.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Meetings, Perinatal addiction, Planning, Public awareness campaigns, Recovering alcoholics

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2007. The Surgeon General's call to action to prevent and reduce underage drinking. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 94 pp.

Annotation: This report seeks to engage all levels of government as well as individuals and private sector institutions in a coordinated, multifaceted effort to prevent and reduce underage drinking and its adverse consequences. The report discusses the scope of the problem, alcohol use and adolescent development, prevention and reduction of alcohol use and alcohol use disorders in adolescents, and a vision for the future. Conclusions, references, and acknowledgments are also included. The report includes two appendices: (1) definition of a standard drink and (2) diagnostic criteria for alcohol abuse and dependence.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Prevention

Minnesota Department of Health, Maternal Child Health - Community and Family Health. 2007. Smart Women Smart Choices: iParty Smarter.com. St. Paul, MN: Maternal Child Health - Community and Family Health, Minnesota Department of Health,

Annotation: This Web site is a free self-guided change program designed for Minnesota women between the ages of 19 and 24 who are sexually active and drink alcohol, even at moderate levels or just once in a while, or may be concerned about the effects of alcohol on their lives. Women ages 25-45 may also participate. Information is provided on the goals of the program, what women will get out of the program, how the program works, and program steps. Also discussed is how drinking contributes to risky behaviors and fetal alcohol syndrome.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, Division of Community and Family Health, MN Telephone: (651) 201-3589 E-mail: health.cfhcommunications@state.mn.us Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/cfh/program/cfh Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcoholic beverages, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Minnesota, Pregnant women, Risk taking, Self help programs, State programs, Women, Young women

Suellentrop K, Morrow B, Williams L, D'Angelo D. 2006. Monitoring progress toward achieving maternal and infant Healthy People 2010 objectives -- 19 states, Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), 2000-2003. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 55(SS-9):1-11,

Annotation: This report provides a snapshot of how the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) data can be used to monitor state progress toward achieving maternal and child Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objectives. The report summarizes data from 19 states that measured progress toward achieving HP 2010 objectives for eight personal indicators: (1) pregnancy intention, (2) multivitamin use, (3) physical abuse, (4) cigarette smoking during pregnancy, (5) cigarette smoking cessation, (6) drinking alcohol during pregnancy, (7) breastfeeding initiation, and (8) infant sleep position. The report, which includes an abstract, introduces the issue, describes the study methods, provides results, and offers a discussion and a conclusion. References are included. Statistical information is provided in tables at the end of the report.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption during pregnancy, Breastfeeding, Child health, Healthy People 2010, Maternal health, Physical abuse, Pregnancy, Sleep position, Smoking during pregnancy

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.