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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (215 total).

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d.. Alcohol: Your child and drugs. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 1 p. (Teen health brochures)

Annotation: This brochure explains the developmental damage that can occur to adolescents from alcohol and emphasizes parent-child communication as one of the best ways of preventing this problem.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $15.00 for 100 copies, members; $20.00, nonmembers. Minimum order: 100 copies.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Alcohol abuse, Communication

Boston Healthy Start Initiative. n.d.. Support materials for substance abuse workshop: Women for Sobriety acceptance program work book. Boston, MA: Boston Healthy Start Initiative, 158 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed for women with alcohol dependency who are participating in a substance abuse workshop. The manual explains recovery, the roots of addiction, relapses and slips, and recovery programs (including holistic recovery). It also includes exercises and a bibliography for the educator, and handouts and a glossary for participants. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Boston Healthy Start Initiative, 1010 Massachusetts Avenue, Second Floor, Boston, MA 02118, Telephone: (617) 534-5395 Secondary Telephone: (617) 534-9799 Contact Phone: (617) 534-7828 Fax: (617) 534-5358 E-mail: healthystart@bphc.org Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol dependence, Alcohol education, Alcohol rehabilitation, Alcoholism, Boston Healthy Start, Educational materials, Risk prevention, Substance abuse, Substance abuse treatment, Substance dependence, Training materials

Great Expectations/Healthy Start. n.d.. Prenatal education curriculum. New Orleans, LA: Great Expectations/Healthy Start, ca. 150 pp.

Annotation: This study guide consists of a series of brief training sessions on various aspects of prenatal and infant care. Curricula topics include the following: 1) anatomy and physiology of pregnancy; 2) breastfeeding; 3) alcohol, smoking, and drug abuse; 4) personal hygiene; 5) sexually transmitted diseases; 6) contraception/family planning; and 7) domestic violence. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Great Expectations Foundation, Inc., 4298 Elysian Fields Avenue, Suite B, New Orleans, LA 70122, Telephone: (504) 288-7818 Fax: (504) 288-7328 E-mail: arichard@greatexp.org Web Site: Available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Breastfeeding, Contraception, Curricula, Domestic violence, Educational materials, Great Expectations/New Orleans Healthy Start, Infant care, Infant health, Nutrition, Pregnancy, Prenatal care, Prenatal education, Prenatal nutrition, Sexually transmitted diseases, Smoking, Substance dependence, Training materials

Kessel R. n.d.. Diagnostic and Followup Project for Native American Children in Wisconsin with Special Health Care Needs = WINGS Project [Final report]. Madison, WI: Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin at Madison , 42 pp.

Annotation: This project was part of an ongoing effort to identify and address issues related to developmental disabilities among Native American children in Wisconsin to assure that proper diagnostic and followup services are provided to this population. Tribes, State and local agencies, and volunteer organizations were involved in a collaborative effort to design and establish a long-term, community-based, high quality program in each tribal community in Wisconsin to serve the special health care needs of Native American children. The two main goals of the project were to: (1) Become an integral part of the tribal service systems, and (2) improve those systems in such a way that they address both the needs of developmentally disabled children and the issues related to the prevention of disabilities. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-161941.

Keywords: American Indians, Community-Based Health Care, Coordination of Health Care, Data Collection, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2018. Medicaid coverage of medication-assisted treatment for alcohol and opioid use disorders and of medication for the reversal of opioid overdose. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 113 pp.

Annotation: This report presents summary information on Medicaid coverage and financing of medications to treat alcohol and opioid use disorders (MAT). It discusses issues including prior authorization, innovative approaches to financing and delivering MAT, state considerations for covering MAT (including efficacy, costs, regulations, and policies), and innovative models and best practices.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: HHS SMA-18-5093 .

Keywords: Alcohol dependence, Drugs, Health care financing, Medicaid, Opiates, Substance abuse treatment

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2017. Focus on prevention: Strategies and programs to prevent substance use. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 59 pp.

Annotation: This guide aims to help groups and communities move from concerns about abuse of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs to practical ways to get the word out about prevention. It provides a brief discussion and starting points for these focus topics: the strategic prevention framework, prevention theory, risk and protection, community needs, strategies that work, issues and audiences, community partners, connecting with your audience, social marketing, media and social media, and evaluation. A suggested event timeline and sample materials are provided to help develop a successful news conference, and a list of substance abuse prevention resources is included. A Spanish language version is also available from the publisher.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Single copies available at no charge. Document Number: DHHS Pub. no. (SMA) 10-4120.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Communities, Drug abuse, Evaluation, Media campaigns, Prevention, Protective factors, Risk factors, Smoking, Spanish language materials

Fond M, Kendall-Taylor N, Volmert A, Pineau MG, L’Hôte E. 2017. Seeing the spectrum: Mapping the gaps between expert and public understandings of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in Manitoba. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute, 49 pp.

Annotation: This report presents an empirically-based framing strategy for communicating about fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Contents include a set of principles reflecting expert understanding of what fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is, how alcohol affects fetal development, why women consume alcohol while pregnant, what the effects of FASD are, and how FASD can be prevented and addressed. The report also describes shared but implicit understandings, assumptions, and patterns of reasoning that shape how the public thinks about FASD, points at which expert and public understandings overlap and diverge, and key challenges in communicating about FASD. Recommendations are included.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Beliefs, Communication, Culturally competent services, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fetal development, Prevention services, Research, Trauma care

American College of Nurse-Midwives and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [2015]. Alcohol and pregnancy: Tips on why and how to stop drinking. Silver Spring, MD: American College of Nurse-Midwives, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource for pregnant women provides information about drinking alcohol during pregnancy and the risk of fetal alcohol syndrome disorders (FASDs). Topics include some of the behavioral and intellectual disabilities of people with FASDs, what women can do to help themselves stop drinking alcohol, and related organizational resources.

Contact: American College of Nurse-Midwives, 8403 Colesville Road, Suite 1550, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (240) 485-1800 Secondary Telephone: (888) MID-WIFE (643-9433) Fax: (240) 485-1818 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.midwife.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Educational materials, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Pregnant women, Prevention, Substance use

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. 2015. Planning alcohol interventions using NIAAA's CollegeAIM alcohol intervention matrix. Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 36 pp.

Annotation: This document for higher education officials, particularly alcohol and other drug program and student life staff, provides information and guidance on choosing interventions to address harmful and underage drinking in campus communities. Contents include a matrix and summary tables of individual- and environmental-level strategies. A strategy planning worksheet, frequently asked questions, and supporting resources are also included.

Contact: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, , 5635 Fishers Lane, MSC 9304, Bethesda, MD 20892-9304, Telephone: (301) 443-3860 Fax: (301) 780-1726 E-mail: NIAAAweb-r@exchange.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.niaaa.nih.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 15-AA-8017.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Colleges, Intervention, Prevention programs, Program planning, Resources for professionals, Students, Young adults

Levi J, Segal LM, De Biasi A, Martin A. 2015. Reducing teen substance misuse: What really works. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 99 pp.

Annotation: This report includes state-by-state youth drug overdose death rates and rankings, and a report card for how well states scored on 10 key indicators of leading evidence-based policies and programs that can improve the wellbeing of children and youth and have been connected with preventing and reducing misuse of alcohol, tobacco or other drugs.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Drug use attitudes, Drug use behavior, Health education, Health policy, Prevention programs, Protective factors, Risk factors, Smoking, Tobacco use, Young adults

University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit. 2015. The Parent-Child Assistance Program (PCAP): Prevention & intervention with high-risk mothers and their children. Seattle, WA: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brochure describes a program to prevent and/or reduce the risk of maternal alcohol and drug abuse by providing home visitation and intervention over a 3-year period by trained and supervised case managers. Contents include a description of the program goals, approach, client outcomes, and eligibility criteria. Topics include helping mothers build and maintain healthy independent family lives, assuring that children are in safe and stable homes, and preventing future births of alcohol and drug-exposed children.

Contact: University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit, 180 Nickerson Street, Suite 309, Seattle, WA 98109, Telephone: (206) 543-7155 Fax: (206) 685-2903 Contact E-mail: granttm@uw.edu Web Site: http://depts.washington.edu/fadu Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Case management, Child safety, Drug abuse, Family support programs, Fetal alcohol effects, High risk children, High risk mothers, Home visiting, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Program descriptions, Referrals, Risk factors, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Washington, Women

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Tobacco, alcohol, and substance use during preconception and pregnancy: Resource brief (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Tobacco, alcohol, and substance use in children and adolescents: Resource brief (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2014. Planning and implementing screening and brief intervention for risky alcohol use: A step-by-step guide for primary care practices. Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, 51 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to help an individual or small planning team adapt alcohol screening and brief intervention (SBI) to the primary care practice. Topics include understanding the need for alcohol SBI, getting organizational commitment, planning for SBI and establishing referral procedures, orientating and training, planning a pilot test, supporting a strong start-up, monitoring and updating the plan, and communicating about alcohol SBI services. The appendices contain additional information on topics such as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, risky and binge drinking, screening instruments, and billing.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption behavior, Communication, Intervention, Planning, Primary care, Referrals, Screening

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Center for Excellence. 2014. Tools for success: Working with youth with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) in the juvenile justice system (rev.). Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Center for Excellence, 1 v.

Annotation: These modules for individuals working with youth in the juvenile justice system provide information and resources on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Contents include six modules on topics such as FASD basics; behaviors; screening, assessment, and diagnosis; collaborating effectively; and intervention services. Each module ends with a 10-question quiz.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Center for Excellence, 2101 Gaither Road, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20850, Telephone: (866)786-7327 E-mail: fasdcenter1@ngc.com Web Site: http://www.fascenter.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Continuing education, Criminal justice system, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Intervention, Resources for professionals, Training, Youth

Federal Trade Commission, Bureau of Consumer Protection and Bureau of Economics. 2014. Self-regulation in the alcohol industry: Report of the Federal Trade Commission. Washington, DC: Federal Trade Commission, 49 pp.

Annotation: This report documents alcohol industry self-regulatory initiatives designed to address concerns about underage exposure to alcohol marketing. Contents include data about how industry members allocate marketing expenditures; compliance with its advertising placement standard; online and digital marketing, including privacy practices; product placements in entertainment media; and external review of complaints related to self-regulatory code compliance. The report provides the data in an aggregate, anonymous fashion.

Contact: Federal Trade Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20580, Telephone: (202) 326-2222 E-mail: webmaster@ftc.gov Web Site: http://www.ftc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advertising, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Consumer protection, Costs, Data, Industry, Marketing, Regulations

Sacks VH, Moore KA, Ramirez AN, Terzian M. 2014. An analysis of state underage drinking policies and adolescent alcohol use. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 9 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines the relationship between 14 state underage drinking laws and drinking prevalence among U. S. high school students, using data from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey, the Alcohol Policy Information System, and the Child Trends' state policy database. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol consumption behavior, Policy analysis, Prevalence, Risk taking, State legislation

Minnesota Department of Health. 2013. Infant mortality in Minnesota: A summary of statistics, activities, and past work group recommendations-Region V Infant Mortality Summit. [St. Paul, MN]: Minnesota Department of Health, 35 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a summit in March 2013 to address the infant mortality problem in Minnesota, particularly racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality, and to lay a foundation for the development of a comprehensive plan by the Minnesota Department of Health and its partners to further reduce infant mortality. Section 1 provides an overview of infant mortality in Minnesota by putting into context the significant racial and ethnic infant mortality disparities that exist in the state. Sections 2 and 3 highlight infant mortality rates by selected infant and maternal characteristics. Section 4 addresses selected maternal behaviors linked to infant mortality such as smoking and alcohol consumption. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Drug use during pregnancy, Ethnic factors, Infant death, Infant mortality, Minnesota, Prenatal influences, Racial factors, Risk factors, State initiatives

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration. 2013. Talk. They hear you.. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration, multiple items.

Annotation: These campaign resources are designed to increase parents' awareness of the prevalence and risk of underage drinking among children and adolescents ages 9 to 15; equip parents with the knowledge, skills, and confidence to prevent underage drinking; and increase parents' actions to prevent underage drinking. Contents include fact sheets, character backstories, and a video. A style guide for adapting the campaign and its key messages to organizational outreach efforts, campaign identity templates, media and promotional tools, customizable parent resources, and social medial tools are also available from the website.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol abuse, Children, National initiatives, Public awareness campaigns, Substance abuse prevention

Dworsky A, Napolitano L, Barisik E, Reddy S, Simon M. 2013. The Demoiselle-2-Femme (D2F) pregnancy prevention program evaluation: Findings from the first baseline survey. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a baseline survey completed by 241 girls, primarily African American, in grade 9 through 11 who are participating in a federally funded evaluation of the Demoiselle-2-Femme signature after-school program in Chicago, Illinois. The purpose of the evaluation is to estimate the effects of program participation on a number of key behavioral outcomes, including sexual activity, unprotected sex, and adolescent pregnancy. The report presents background; describes the program; and discusses study design and methods; student characteristics; relationships with adults; attitudes, feelings, and knowledge about sexual behavior; sexual behavior and prior pregnancy; dating violence; tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use; and educational expectations.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent females, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Alcohol consumption behavior, Blacks, Community programs, Dating, Educational attainment, Illinois, Interpersonal violence, Marijuana, Prevention, Relationships, Smoking, Substance abuse

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.