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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (75 total).

Phipps KR, Ricks TL, Mork NP, Lozon TL. 2020. The oral health of 13-15 year old American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) dental clinic patients: A follow-up report to the 2013 survey. Rockville, MD: U.S. Indian Health Service, 7 pp. (Indian Health Service data brief)

Annotation: This report provides follow-up information about a 2019–2020 survey on the oral health of 13–15-year-old American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) dental clinic patients. A summary of what's new in the report since the last survey was conducted in 2013–2014 is provided, and background information on oral health among this population is included. Additional information is presented in three main areas: (1) oral health of AI/AN adolescents over the past two decades, (2) oral health disparities in AI/AN adolescents compared with U.S. adolescents overall, and (3) percentage of AI/AN adolescents, including those enrolled in Medicaid, who had a dental visit in the past year compared with U.S. adolescents overall.

Contact: U.S. Indian Health Service, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Web Site: https://www.ihs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Alaska Natives, Medicaid, Oral health, Pacific Islanders, Surveys, Surveys, Trends

National Indian Health Board, Tribal Oral Health Initiative. [2019]. Dental therapy start up guide for tribal leaders. Washington, DC: National Indian Health Board, 88 pp.

Annotation: This guide discusses oral health issues in tribal communities and offers potential solutions to these communities’ oral health challenges. Topics include how Alaska has used dental therapists (instead of dentists) to provide needed oral health services, how tribes can evaluate the potential of using dental therapists to meet their oral health needs, complying with state statutes and regulations, implementing tribal licensing, developing the workforce, building financial stability, and integrating dental therapists into a tribe’s oral health team. Stories from individuals and a tribe are included.

Contact: National Indian Health Board, 926 Pennsylvania Avenue, S.E., Washington, DC 20003, Telephone: (202) 507-4070 Fax: (202) 507-4071 E-mail: sbohlen@nihb.org Web Site: http://www.nihb.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Alaska, Alaska natives, American Indians, Federal legislation, Oral health, State programs

Phipps KR, Ricks, TL, Mork NP, Lozon TL. 2019. The oral health of American Indian and Alaska Native children aged 1-5 years: Results of the 2018-19 IHS oral health survey. Rockville, MD: U.S. Indian Health Service, 10 pp. (Indian Health Service data brief)

Annotation: This data brief focuses on the oral health of American Indian and Alaska Native children ages 1–5. The brief presents information on the prevalence of early childhood caries, untreated tooth decay, and dental sealants in the primary teeth of this population in 2018–2019 and assesses trends since the 2010 survey was conducted. The results of the 2018–2019 survey are presented as five key findings. For each finding, statistical data are included. Implications of the results are also discussed.

Contact: U.S. Indian Health Service, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Web Site: https://www.ihs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: , Alaska natives, Dental caries, Dental sealants, Early Childhood caries, Native Americans, Oral health, Statistical data, Surveys

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse. 2019. A healthy mouth for your baby. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse, 12 pp.

Annotation: This document is intended to help parents keep their infant’s mouth healthy. It lists five steps that parents can take: protect the infant’s teeth with fluoride, check and clean the infant’s teeth, feed the infant healthy food, don’t put the infant to bed with a bottle, and take the infant to the dentist before age 1. The text is accompanied with colorful illustrations. A conversation between two women in which one learns from the other about how to keep a baby’s teeth healthy is included. The document is available in two versions, one intended for a general audience (which is available in English and in Spanish) and one intended for an American Indian/Alaska Native audience.

Contact: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-2190, Telephone: (866) 232-4528 E-mail: nidcrinfo@mail.nih.gov Web Site: https://www.nidcr.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives: Spanish language materials, American Indians, Consumer education materials, Oral health: Infant health, Prevention

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2018. Behavioral health services for American Indians and Alaska Natives: For behavioral health service providers, administrators, and supervisors . Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 220 pp. (Treatment improvement protocol: TIP 61)

Annotation: This document provides behavioral health professionals with practical guidance about Native American history, historical trauma, and critical cultural perspectives in their work with American Indian and Alaska Native clients. The TIP discusses the demographics, social challenges, and behavioral health concerns of Native Americans. It highlights the importance of providers’ cultural awareness, cultural competence, and culture-specific knowledge. The TIP also helps administrators, program managers, and clinical supervisors foster a culturally responsive environment for American Indian and Alaska Native clients. Specific topic areas include workforce development strategies, program and professional development considerations, and culturally responsive policies and procedures.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS (SMA) 18-5070 .

Keywords: Alaska natives, American Indians, Culturally competent services

Phipps KR, Ricks, TL. 2017. The oral health of American Indian and Alaska Native children aged 6-9 years: Results of the 2016-2017 IHS oral health survey. Rockville, MD: U.S. Indian Health Service, 11 pp. (Indian Health Service data brief)

Annotation: This data brief focuses on the oral health of American Indian and Alaska Native children ages 6–9. Using data from an ongoing oral health surveillance system the Indian Health Service established in 2010, the brief presents information on the prevalence of dental sealants, untreated tooth decay, and dental sealants in the primary teeth of this population in 2018–2019 and assesses trends since the 2010 survey was conducted. The results of the 2016–2017 survey are presented as five key findings and one overall recommendation. For each finding, statistical data are included.

Contact: U.S. Indian Health Service, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Web Site: https://www.ihs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska natives, Dental caries, Dental sealants, Native Americans, Oral health, School age children, Statistical data, Surveys

Commission to Eliminate Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities. 2016. WIthin our reach: A national strategy to eliminate child abuse and neglect fatalities. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 167 pp.

Annotation: This final report presents a vision for realigning organizations, communities, and priorities to identify and support children at highest risk of abuse or neglect fatality. Contents include recommendations for addressing the needs of American Indian/Alaska Native children and reducing child abuse and neglect deaths in disproportionately affected communities, improving leadership and accountability, grounding decisions in better data and research, and enhancing multidisciplinary support for families. A report fact sheet, social media toolkit, public meeting materials, deliberations, and resources on child abuse and neglect fatalities and National Child Abuse Prevention Month are also available.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Child abuse, Child death, Child neglect, Children, Decision making, Family centered care, Injury prevention, Leadership, Multidisciplinary approach, National initiatives, Program improvement, Resources for professionals, Strategic plans, Systems development, Welfare reform

Lechner A, Cavanaugh M, Blyler C. 2016. Addressing trauma in American Indian and Alaska Native youth. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes an environmental scan of practices and programs for addressing trauma and related behavioral health needs in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth. Contents include a summary of the scan scope and results, trauma-informed care and trauma-specific interventions, interventions focused on suicide prevention and substance use disorders, parenting interventions for youth and their guardians, aspirational frameworks, and common elements of programs addressing trauma and related behavioral health needs of AI/AN youth. The systematic database search methodology and summaries of interventions and evaluations are also provided.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indian, Intervention, Mental health, Model programs, Parenting, Program evaluation, Protective factors, Substance use disorders, Suicide prevention, Trauma, Trauma care, Youth

Phipps KR, Ricks TL. 2015. The oral health of 1–5 year old American Indian and Alaska Native children: Results of the 2014 IHS Oral Health Survey. Rockville, MD: U.S. Indian Health Service, Division of Oral Health, 9 pp. (Indian Health Service data brief)

Annotation: This brief presents findings from a national survey to assess the oral health status of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children ages 1–5. Contents include information on the prevalence of tooth decay in the primary and permanent teeth of AI/AN children ages 1–5 in 2014 at both the national and Indian Health Service Area level, as well as trends in the oral health of this population since 2010. The brief also describes the prevalence of dental sealants on a primary molar tooth among this population.

Contact: U.S. Indian Health Service, Division of Oral Health, 5600 Fishers Lane, Mail Stop 08N34 A, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (800) 447-3368 E-mail: dentaljobs@ihs.gov Web Site: http://www.ihs.gov/dentistry Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Comparative analysis, Dental caries, Dental sealants, Health status, National surveys, Oral health, Population surveillance, Prevalence, Statistical data, Trends, Young children

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Back to Sleep Campaign. 2014. Safe sleep for your baby: Reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) (upd. ed.). Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 12 pp. (Safe to Sleep® )

Annotation: This brochure provides answers to common questions about sudden infant death syndrome and encourages parents and other caregivers to share the messages with everyone who cares for their infant or for any infant under age 1. The brochure is available in English and Spanish. It has also been adapted for outreach to African Americans and American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 12-5355 (African Americans), 12-7040 (English), 12-7040(S) (Spanish), 12-7462 (American Indians/Alaska Natives).

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Blacks, Consumer education materials, Cultural factors, Infant death, Prevention, Risk factors, SIDS, Sleep position, Spanish language materials

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2014. Strategies for behavioral health organizations to promote new health opportunities in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 3 pp.

Desiderio G, Garrido M, Garcia M, Eisler A. 2014. Lessons learned in providing health care services for Native youth. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 7 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes agency efforts to provide health care services for Native youth and their lessons learned. Topics include health issues Native youth commonly face, ways youth use health services, youth-friendly services and ways to provide them, and integrating Native culture and traditional practices with medical practice. The report concludes with a discussion of areas and issues that need to be addressed in order to increase the number of youth accessing services, as well as suggestions for other agencies and clinics trying to establish health services for Native youth.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Barriers, Cultural factors, Culturally competent services, Ethnic groups, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Service integration, Youth

Esposito AM, Del Grosso P, Kleinman R, Sama-Miller E, Paulsell D. 2014. Assessing the evidence of effectiveness of home visiting program models implemented in tribal communities: Final report [2nd rev.]. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 137 pp.

Annotation: This report describes findings from a review of home visiting programs implemented in tribal communities or evaluated with American Indian or Alaska Native families and children. The report describes the review process that the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) team used to identity, screen, and assess the research literature and review results. (HomVEE is a systematic review of home visiting research launched by the Administration for Children and Families and the Department of Health and Human Services in 2009.) The report also presents descriptive information from studies on participant outcomes measures, provides descriptions of the home visiting model characteristics, and discusses lessons learned. It is an update of a report that was issued in 2012.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska natives, American Indians, Children, Families, Home visiting, Infants, Low income groups, Prevention, Research

U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation. 2014. Tribal home visiting programs: Review of the evidence. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 3 pp.

Annotation: This document describes the systematic process used by the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) project team to review tribal program models, as well as the team's implementation findings and lessons learned. Topics include rating the studies; examining the impacts in high- and moderate-rated studies on American Indians, Alaska Natives, and indigenous populations; and identifying evidence-based models. Additional topics include target outcomes, service delivery, target populations, location of services and types of implementing agencies, staff qualifications and training, and recommendations for future research.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Home visiting, MCH research, Models, Service delivery systems, Work force

Phipps KR, Ricks TL, Blahut P. 2014. The oral health of 6–9 year old American Indian and Alaska Native children compared to the general U.S. population and Healthy People 2020 targets. Rockville, MD: U.S. Indian Health Service, Division of Oral Health, 5 pp. (Indian Health Service data brief)

Annotation: This brief presents findings from a national survey to assess the oral health status of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) students in kindergarten through third grade. Contents include information about the prevalence of tooth decay in the primary and permanent teeth of AI/AN students in kindergarten through third grade compared to those in the general U.S. population and to targets for Healthy People 2020. The brief also provides information about the prevalence of dental sealants.

Contact: U.S. Indian Health Service, Division of Oral Health, 5600 Fishers Lane, Mail Stop 08N34 A, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (800) 447-3368 E-mail: dentaljobs@ihs.gov Web Site: http://www.ihs.gov/dentistry Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Comparative analysis, Dental caries, Dental sealants, Health status, Healthy People 2020, National surveys, Oral health, Population surveillance, Prevalence, School age children, Statistical data

Phipps KR, Ricks TL, Blahut P. 2014. The oral health of 13–15 year old American Indian and Alaska Native children: Compared to the general U.S. population and Healthy People 2020 targets. Rockville, MD: U.S. Indian Health Service, Division of Oral Health, 6 pp. (Indian Health Service data brief)

Annotation: This brief presents findings from a national survey to assess the oral health status of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) adolescents ages 13–15. Contents include information on the prevalence of tooth decay in the permanent teeth of AI/AN adolescents compared to the prevalence in their counterparts in the general U.S. population and to Healthy People 2020 targets. The brief also describes the prevalence of dental sealants.

Contact: U.S. Indian Health Service, Division of Oral Health, 5600 Fishers Lane, Mail Stop 08N34 A, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (800) 447-3368 E-mail: dentaljobs@ihs.gov Web Site: http://www.ihs.gov/dentistry Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alaska Natives, American Indians, Comparative analysis, Dental caries, Dental sealants, Health status, Healthy People 2020, National surveys, Oral health, Population surveillance, Prevalence, Statistical data

Artiga S, Arguello R, Duckett P. 2013. Health coverage and care for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Washington, DC: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 21 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses disparities between Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and whites in access to health insurance coverage and health care in the United States and summarizes the issues and challenges. Statistical data on population demographics, health insurance coverage and care, the role of the Indian Health Service, the role of Medicaid in these populations, discussion of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act coverage expansions, and looking ahead to opportunities for increased coverage, continuing gaps in coverage, as well as care inequities and poor health outcomes.

Contact: Kaiser Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: http://www.kff.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://kff.org/about-kaiser-commission-on-medicaid-and-the-uninsured/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Alaska Natives, American Indians, Health insurance, Indian Health Service, Low income groups, Minority groups, Minority health, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics

U.S. Office of Minority Health. 2013. The Circle of Life multimedia program. [Rockville. MD]: U.S. Office of Minority Health,

Annotation: This website presents the Circle of Life multimedia program, a curriculum intended for American Indian/Alaska Native middle school students that is based on the medicine wheel, a teaching symbol about mental, physical, spiritual, and emotional wellness. This holistic health promotion model is meant to help students learn about making healthy choices to prevent disease such as HIV/AIDS. The curriculum is divided into seven chapter sessions that are 20-25 minutes each and is presented in a modular form that can be broken up or used in sequence either in or outside the classroom. Teacher notes and an accessible version of the curriculum are also available on the website.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health, The Tower Building, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2882 Secondary Telephone: (240) 453-2883 Fax: (240) 453-2883 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Alaska natives, American Indians, Child health, Curricula, Educational materials, HIV, Middle school students, Prevention, Sexually transmitted diseases

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Minority Health and Health Disparities. 2013. American Indians and Alaska Natives in Maryland: Health data and resources. Balitmore, MD: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Minority Health and Health Disparities, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the health of Maryland's Native American and Alaska Native population. The report includes data highlights; basic information about this population; and information about social and economic well-being, economic characteristics, mortality, access to health care, health risk and protective factors, cancer, chronic disease, HIV and infectious diseases, maternal and infant health, and mental health.

Contact: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Minority Health and Health Disparities, 201 West Preston Street, Room 500, Baltimore, MD 21201, Telephone: (410) 767-7117 E-mail: https://health.maryland.gov/Pages/contactus.aspx Web Site: http://dhmh.maryland.gov/mhhd/Pages/home.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Alaska natives, Cancer, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, HIV, Health, Hispanic American Indians, Infant health, Maryland, Mental health, Minority groups, Mortality, Protective factors, Racial factors, Risk factors, State surveys, Statistical data, Women's health

Anderson KL, Olson S, and Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities, Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. 2013. Leveraging culture to address health inequalities: Examples from Native communities—Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 91 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a workshop convened in November 2012 to discuss the sizable health inequities affecting Native American, Alaska Native, First Nation, and Pacific Islander populations and the potential role of culture in helping to reduce those inequities. This report summarizes the presentations and discussion of the workshop and includes case studies that examine programs aimed at diabetes prevention and management and cancer prevention and treatment programs.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu $36, plus shipping and handling; also available from the website, after registration. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-29256-6.

Keywords: Minority health, Alaska natives, American Indians, Barriers, Cancer, Cultural factors, Diabetes mellitus, Disease prevention, Health status disparities, Pacific Islanders, Prevention services, Preventive health services, Socioeconomic factors

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.