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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 17 (17 total).

Tobacco Control Legal Consortium. 2016. U.S. e-cigarette regulation: A 50-state review. St. Paul, MN: Tobacco Control Legal Consortium, 67 pp.

Annotation: This report presents a snapshot of the U.S. landscape of e-cigarette regulation. Contents include information from a 50-state (plus Washington, DC) survey of state statutes pertaining to e-cigarette regulations. Topics include definition of tobacco product, taxation, product packaging, youth access/other retail restrictions, retail license/permit requirement, and smoke-free air legislation. An interactive state map is also available.

Contact: Tobacco Control Legal Consortium, 875 Summit Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55105-3076, Telephone: (651) 290-7506 Web Site: http://www.publichealthlawcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Licensing, Marketing, Regulations, Smoking, State legislation, Taxes, Tobacco

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 2015. Energy savings plus health: Indoor air quality guidelines for school building upgrades. Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 125 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines are designed to assist school administrators and others in protecting and improving indoor air quality (IAQ) in schools during building upgrades, particularly energy efficiency upgrades and building renovation activities. Contents include fundamental principles of IAQ, the business case for integrating energy efficiency and IAQ, and assessment protocols and recommended actions. Topics include project planning and integrated design; moisture and mold; hazardous materials; indoor and outdoor contaminants and sources; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning; and safety. The appendices contain information about project planning and developing a project team, communication and education, and worker protection. A master verification checklist is also included.

Contact: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Ariel Rios Building, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20460, Telephone: (202) 272-0167 Web Site: http://www2.epa.gov/children Available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Assessment, Environmental exposure, Facility design and construction, Planning, Protocols, Safety, School age children, Schools

Currie J, Zivin JSG, Mullins J, Beidell MJ. 2013. What do we know about short and long term effects of early life exposure to pollution?. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 41 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 19571)

Annotation: This paper reviews the economic research that brings together literatures on the effects of pollution exposure early in life on near-term health and on the influence of early childhood health on health and human capital later in life. The paper begins with a conceptual model that highlights the core relationships across the life cycle and then reviews the literature concerned with such estimates, focusing in particular on identifying strategies to mitigate concerns about endogenous exposure. Also discussed are potential policy implications and promising avenues for future research.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adult health, Air pollution, Child health, Environmental exposure, Environmental pollution, Infant health, Infants, Public policy, Research, Water pollution, Young children

Axelrad D et al. 2013. America's children and the environment (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 494 pp.

Annotation: This report presents data on children's environmental health. Topics include (1) environments and contaminants such as air, indoor, drinking water, chemicals in food, contaminated lands, and climate change; (2) biomonitoring, such as lead, mercury, pcbs, and others; and (3) health concerns such as respiratory diseases, childhood cancer, neurodevelopomental disorders, obesity, and adverse birth outcomes. The report also covers birth defects and contaminants in schools and child care facilities. An appendix also describes the alignment of these indicators with Healthy People 2020 objectives.

Contact: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Ariel Rios Building, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20460, Telephone: (202) 272-0167 Web Site: http://www2.epa.gov/children Available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Chemicals, Child health, Congenital abnormalities, Disease, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Lead, Pesticides, Water pollution, Women's health

American Lung Association. 2012. State of the air. New York, NY: American Lung Association, annual.

Annotation: This report assigns U.S. counties a grade of "A" through "F" based on how often their air quality in a given county crossed into the unhealthful categories of the Environmental Protection Agency's air quality index for ground-level ozone (smog) and particle pollution. The report, which comprises text, tables, and figures, contains the following sections: an executive summary and introduction, grading the risk, nationwide and regional analyses, adverse health effects of ozone and particle pollution, protecting the nation from ozone, and concludes with a section of endnotes. The report also includes four appendices: (1) description of methodology, (2) regional differences in ozone, (3) additional comparison tables, and (4) state data tables.

Contact: American Lung Association, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 785-3355 Secondary Telephone: (800) 548-8252 Fax: (202) 452-1805 E-mail: info@lungusa.org Web Site: http://www.lungusa.org Available from the website, after registration.

Keywords: Air pollution, Data, Environmental health, National surveys, State surveys, Statistics

Knittel CR, Miller DL, Sanders NJ. 2011. Caution drivers! Children present: Traffic, pollution, and infant health. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 43 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17222)

Annotation: This paper examines the impact of modern air pollution levels on infant health and the impact of automobile driving on ambient air pollution levels. The authors pull from four separate data sets to investigate the relationships between traffic, weather, pollution, and infant outcomes, focusing their research primarily on the Central Valley and southern portions of California. The findings suggest that ambient pollution levels have an impact on infant mortality rates. The results, which are presented in the form of tables and figures, also illustrate the significance of weather controls in measuring pollution’s impact on infant mortality.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website, after registration.

Keywords: Air pollution, Environmental factors, Environmental pollution, Infant health, Infant mortality, Research, Traffic

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. 2011. Addressing new challenges in children's environmental health. Research Triangle Park, NC: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about research programs conducted by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences to address children's health issues. Programs summarized are divided into the following categories: disease prevention; studies on the growing brain, studies on air pollution and respiratory disease, studies on reproduction, and studies on breast cancer.

Contact: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD K3-16, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2233, Telephone: (919) 541-3345 Fax: (919) 541-4395 E-mail: webcenter@niehs Web Site: http://www.niehs.nih.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Asthma, Autism, Breast cancer, Child health, Cognitive development, Environmental influences, Mental health, Prevention, Programs, Reproductive health, Research

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2009. The Surgeon General's call to action to promote healthy homes. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 66 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the factors that influence health and safety in the home and the steps that people can take to prevent injury, disability, and disease that may result from an unhealthy housing environment. The report addresses (1) the need for healthy homes; (2) the connection between health and homes; (3) promoting healthy homes through prevention; (4) homes and health research; and (5) translating research into practical application and policy. Among the topics covered are air quality, water quality, residential chemicals, housing structure and design, elevated lead levels, structural deficiencies, mental health, access disparities, housing instability, and homelessness. A series of coordinated action steps call on individuals, families, educators, scientists, businesses, agencies, and organizations, to join in a discussion about healthy home issues; to make informed decisions; and to develop imaginative and realistic solutions that will help ensure that safe, healthy, affordable, and accessible homes are available to everyone in the United States. Related materials include materials from the launch of this program, actions for consumers, a checklist, resources, and a strategic plan.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Building codes, Environmental health, Hazards, Household safety, Housing, Public health, Public policy, Risk factors

Currie J, Neidell MJ, Scmieder J. 2008. Air pollution and infant health: Lessons from New Jersey. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 35 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14196)

Annotation: This paper examines the impact of three criteria air pollutants (carbon monixide, particulate matters, and ozone) on infant health in New Jersey in the 1990s by combining information about the mother's residential location from birth certificates with information from air quality monitors. The paper provides background and provides methods, data, results, a discussion, and a conclusion.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Infant health, New Jersey, Research

Markowitz S. 2006. The effectiveness of cigarette regulations in reducing cases of sudden infant death syndrome. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 37 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 12527)

Annotation: This paper examines the direct effects of cigarette prices, taxes, and clean indoor air laws in explaining changes in the incidence of SIDS over time in the United States.The paper, which includes an abstract, discusses smoking and SIDS, cigarette prices and smoking, methods and data, and results. Conclusions are offered. Statistical information is presented in tables at the end of the paper. A reference list is included.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Costs, Infant mortality, Legislation, SIDS, Smoking

Currie J, Neidell M. 2004. Air pollution and infant health: What we can learn from California's recent experience?. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 50 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 10251)

Annotation: This paper examines the impact of air pollution on infant death in California in the 1990s. The paper includes an abstract, a background section, a description of the data and the methods, and a results section. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables grouped together at the end of the paper. The paper includes a references list.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, California, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Infant mortality

Proscio T. 2004. Healthy housing, healthy families: Toward a national agenda for affordable healthy homes. Columbia, MD: Enterprise Foundation, National Center for Healthy Housing, 19 pp.

Annotation: This report examines emerging trends that point to progress in improving the health prospects of low-income families through practices and policies for providing a decent and affordable home. The report discusses the history of the connection between public health and affordable housing, the health risks associated with poor housing, lead exposure in the home, evidence and standards for healthy housing, harnessing market forces to improve housing conditions through Air Plus for cleaner indoor air, forming coalitions for voluntary change, and healthy housing at the grassroots. A conclusion and endnotes are included.

Contact: National Center for Healthy Housing, 10320 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 500 , Columbia, MD 21044, Telephone: (410) 992-0712 Secondary Telephone: (877) 312-3046 Fax: (443) 539-4150 E-mail: info@nchh.org Web Site: http://www.nchh.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-932699-16-3.

Keywords: Air pollution, Asthma, Coalitions, Community programs, Environmental health, Health, Housing, Housing programs, Lead poisoning, Low income groups, Public policies

Woodruff TJ, Axelrad DA, Kyle AD, Nweke O, Miller GC. 2003. America's children and the environment: Measures of contaminants, body burdens, and illnesses. (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Children's Health Protection, 171 pp.

Annotation: This report brings together quantitative information on trends in levels of environmental contaminants; concentrations of contaminants measured in the bodies of children and women; and childhood illnesses that may be influenced by exposure to environmental contaminants. Report sections discuss environmental contaminants of outdoor and indoor air, drinking water, pesticides, and land contaminants; body burdens of concentrations of lead, mercury, and cotinine; and childhood illnesses such as respiratory diseases, childhood cancer, and neurodevelopmental disorders. Section four of the report discusses emerging issues such as mercury in fish and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Special features, part five of the report, focuses on lead in California schools, pesticides in Minnesota schools, and birth defects in California. Each section contains references. Also included is a section on future directions of measurements used in this report as well as a glossary of terms. The appendices include data tables, data and methods used, and environmental health objectives in Healthy People 2010 and in the Environmental Protection Agency's strategic plan.

Contact: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Children's Health Protection, Room 2512 Ariel Rios North, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Mail Code 1107-T, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 564-2188 Fax: (202) 564-2733 Web Site: http://www2.epa.gov/children Available from the website. Document Number: EPA 240-R-03-001.

Keywords: Air pollution, Chemicals, Child health, Congenital abnormalities, Disease, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Lead, Pesticides, Water pollution, Women's health

Chay KY, Greenstone M. 2003. Air quality, infant mortality, and the Clean Air Act of 1970. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 62 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 10053)

Annotation: This paper examines the effects of total suspended particulates air pollution on infant health using the air quality improvements induced by the 1970 Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA). Topics include background on the CAAA; research design; a discussion of the research design, econometric methods, data sources and summary statistics; and empirical results. The paper also contains a data appendix of statistical information, presented in figures and tables grouped together at the end of the paper. The paper includes a reference list.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Environmental exposure, Federal legislation, Infant health, Infant mortality, Research, Statistical data, Trends

Wargo J, Wargo LE. 2002. The state of children's health and environment 2002: Common sense solutions for parents and policymakers. [Princeton, NJ]: Children's Health Environmental Coalition, 71 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses trends in children's health and their exposure to mixtures of synthetic chemicals in air, water, food, soil, and consumer products, and the lack of government monitoring or regulation. Chapter topics include asthma and air quality; birth defects, developmental disabilities, and neurotoxic chemicals; childhood cancer and the environment; principles for legal reform; and a guide for parents and others. Numerous charts, tables, and graphs present statistical data on child health and environmental quality measures.

Contact: Healthy Child Healthy World, 12300 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 320, Los Angeles, CA 90025, Telephone: (310) 820-2030 Fax: (310) 820-2070 Web Site: http://www.healthychild.org $18.00, including shipping and handling; also available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Asthma, Cancer, Chemicals, Child development disorders, Child health, Congenital abnormalities, Developmental disabilities, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Government role, Regulation, Statistics

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 1999. Child health champion resource guide. Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 196 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide was developed as part of the Child Health Champion Campaign (CHCPP), a program sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to empower local citizens and communities to take steps toward protecting their children from environmental health threats. The guide includes 241 resources that may be of interest to communities participating in the campaign. Resources are organized according to the following categories: air, contaminants, environmental education and community organization, food, health end points, indoor environment, water, and other resources. For each resource, contact information, a brief abstract, and additional information are provided. The guide concludes with an index.

Contact: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Ariel Rios Building, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20460, Telephone: (202) 272-0167 Web Site: http://www2.epa.gov/children Document Number: EPA 100-B-98-004.

Keywords: Air pollution, Child health, Communities, Education, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Food, Resource materials, Water pollution

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health. 1979. Model standards for community preventive health services: A collaborative project of the United States Conference of City Health Officers, National Association of County Health Officials, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, American Public Health Association and Department of Health, Education, and Welfare . Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, 110 pp.

Annotation: This book presents standards which are the framework for incremental improvement in community health status in the United States through preventive health service programming. The intended hallmark of these model standards is flexibility. The preamble spells out in detail the background, concepts, scope, definitions, and uses of the standards. The standards cover air quality, chronic disease control, communicable disease control, dental health, emergency medical services, family planning, food protection, genetic disease control, health education, home health services, housing services, injury control, institutional services, maternal and child health, noise control, nutritional services, occupational health, primary care, public health laboratory, radiological health, safe drinking water, sanitation, school health, solid waste management, surveillance and epidemiology, vector and animal control, and waste water management.

Keywords: Air pollution, Animals, Child health, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Communicable diseases, Emergency medical services, Epidemiology, Family planning, Federal government, Food safety, Genetic disorders, Health education, Home care services, Housing, Injury prevention, Maternal health, Nutrition services, Occupational safety and health, Oral health, Population surveillance, Preventive health services, Primary care, Public health, Public health services, Radiation, Sanitation, School health, Standards, Water pollution

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.