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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (24 total).

Todd JE, Newman C, Ver Ploeg M. 2010. Changing participation in food assistance programs among low-income children after welfare reform. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 30 pp.

Annotation: This study investigates changes in the relative importance of the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program and the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program and food assistance programs by examining changes in the program participation status of children's households and the amounts received from each program both before and after welfare reform. The study also explores how changes in participation status and benefit amounts differed according to household income before and after receiving benefits relative to the poverty line. Finally, the study estimates changes to the turnover rates in each program.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Children, Families, Income factors, Low income groups, Poverty, Research, Supplemental food programs, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, Welfare reform

David and Lucile Packard Foundation. 2002. Children and welfare reform. Los Altos, CA: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, 208 pp., exec. summ. (4 pp.). (The future of children; v. 12, no. 1, Winter/Spring 2002)

Annotation: The issue of "The Future of Children" summarizes knowledge and research about how children from low-income families have been faring since passage of the welfare reform law, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act, in 1996. Article topics include analyses of welfare reform and social policy; child development and children's environments at home and in the community; child care; families and father involvement; and restructuring the safety net for low-income children. The issue also contains a statement of purpose, list of acronyms, and concludes with a selected bibliography

Contact: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, 343 Second Street, Los Altos, CA 94022, Telephone: (650) 948-7658 E-mail: https://www.packard.org/contact-us Web Site: https://www.packard.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Aid to families with dependent children, Child care, Child welfare, Families, Fathers, Low income groups, Poverty, Single parents, Welfare reform

David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Center for the Future of Children. 1997. Welfare to work. Los Altos, CA: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Center for the Future of Children, 144 pp., exec. summ. (7 pp.). (The future of children; v. 7, no. 1, Spring 1997)

Annotation: This issue of "The Future of Children" discusses the impact of the 1996 Welfare Reform law on the lives of welfare mothers and their children. It looks into the effect of the mother's taking a low-wage job instead of staying home and receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children, which will necessitate child care arrangements, and may mean loss of health care coverage.

Contact: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, 343 Second Street, Los Altos, CA 94022, Telephone: (650) 948-7658 E-mail: https://www.packard.org/contact-us Web Site: https://www.packard.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Child care, Child support, Health insurance, Welfare reform, Working mothers

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1996. Welfare waivers implementation: States work to change welfare culture, community involvement, and service delivery. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 56 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of analyses of the implementation of waivers to the regulations for the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program in five states. The programs analyzed were located in Florida, Indiana, New Jersey, Virginia, and Wisconsin. The report provides information on the purpose, context, and methodology of the study and presents and discusses the findings. The states used the waivers to add work requirements, place time limitations on the provision of services, and impose family caps which deny cash benefits for children born to families already participating in Aid to Families with Dependent Children. The states reorganized the operations and the management of their programs to redefine how the staff and clients interact, to increase the involvement of employers and communities, and to restructure their service delivery systems. Not all of the programmatic changes or management revisions were used in each of the five states.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-96-105.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Florida, Indiana, New Jersey, State initiatives, Virginia, Waiver programs, Welfare programs, Wisconsin

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1995. Welfare to work: Participants' characteristics and services provided in JOBS. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of an analysis of the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS) program which was designed as a transition program which would provide welfare recipients the skills they needed to gain employment. This report includes background information on the JOBS program and reviews the implications of program reforms being considered in the Personal Responsibility Act of 1995. It assesses the characteristics of those served and not served by the program, describes the services provided, and discusses the impact of imposing time limitations on the delivery of welfare services.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-95-93.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Employment, Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS), Policy development, Program descriptions, Welfare programs, Welfare reform

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1995. Welfare to work: State programs have tested some of the proposed reforms. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report synthesizes the findings of nine published studies which focused on the welfare-to-work initiatives implemented in eight states since these reforms were enacted in 1988. The synthesis was undertaken to assess how these initiatives compare to the welfare reform measures being considered by Congress in 1995, and to ascertain which approaches resulted in higher rates of employment or in reductions in the number of welfare recipients. The report provides background information for the topic and presents and discusses the findings.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/PEMD-95-26.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Employment, Program descriptions, State programs, Welfare reform

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Child and Adolescent Health Policy Center at Johns Hopkins University, and Child and Adolescent Health Policy Center at The George Washington University. 1995. PIC briefing book: Welfare and education reform. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, ca. 300 pp.

Annotation: This loose-leaf binder is a collection of articles and reports on welfare and education reform prepared for a February, 1995 meeting of the MCH Partnership for Information and Communication (PIC) Interorganizational Work Group. The background materials focus on the potential impact of proposed federal legislation on state programs, lessons learned from state reform efforts, the use of block grants to cap federal spending, and misconceptions about current welfare programs. Sections of the manual concentrate on the possible end of entitlement programs and the corresponding shifting of costs to the states, the relationship of health coverage to welfare dependency, the potential effect of current proposals on immigrant populations, and the adoption of national standards for education. The manual includes a summary of the findings of a National Governors' Association (NGA) survey on state initiatives to reduce reliance on welfare programs as an appendix. Bibliographies on both topics contain citations and abstracts to materials in the reference collection at the National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Educational change, Employment, Employment programs, Federal government, Immigrants, Program evaluation, Proposed legislation, State programs, Training, Welfare programs, Welfare reform

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1995. Welfare to work: Measuring outcomes for JOBS participants. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 43 pp.

Annotation: This report considers what outcome evaluation techniques have been established by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and by state programs to measure the employment outcomes of participants in the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS) program. It presents the results of interviews of DHHS officials and welfare research and interest groups and a questionnaire sent to state JOBS administrators. It also examines issues that should be included in establishing a national approach to measuring the JOBS participant outcomes and setting performance goals. It presents the results in brief and in full, describes the scope and methodology, and includes a copy of the questionnaire.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-95-86.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Employment, Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS), Outcome evaluation, Welfare reform

Twentieth Century Fund . 1995. Welfare reform: A Twentieth Century Fund guide to the issues. New York, NY: Twentieth Century Fund Press, 24 pp. (The basics)

Annotation: This pamphlet presents facts about the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program in order to inform the debate about welfare reform in the United States. It profiles individuals receiving welfare benefits; it provides statistics on the numbers of people utilizing the program, describes the services provided, discusses societal implications contingent on the availability of welfare, and considers the impact of welfare on the individuals and families who receive it.

Contact: Twentieth Century Fund Press, 41 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 535-4441 Fax: (212) 535-7534 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.uiowa.edu/policult/politick/smithson/tcf.htm $4.50 includes shipping and handling.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Federal government, Welfare reform

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1994. Families on welfare: Focus on teenage mothers could enhance welfare reform efforts. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews data on adolescent mothers who are the heads families which are enrolled in the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program to determine which characteristics influence their length of stay on welfare. It contains background information on Aid to Families with Dependent Children and the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS) program, on initiatives to reform the programs, and on the methodology used in the study. The report provides information on the level of education for single adolescent mothers, the time elapsed since they were last employed, and the number and age of their children; factors which affect their participation in Aid to Families with Dependent Children. The report presents and discusses the findings and reviews the implications for developing future policies regarding welfare.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-94-112.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent parents, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Federal programs, Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS), Participants, Policy development, Single parents, Statistics, Welfare programs, Welfare reform

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1994. Families on welfare: Sharp rise in never-married women reflects societal trend. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 68 pp.

Annotation: This report was prepared in response to a request from the members of Congress as they began considering welfare reform. It presents and analyzes information on changes in the characteristics of female-headed families receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children between 1976 and 1992. The report includes demographic, employment, and income trends for all single women receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children and for women who were never married that are receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children. Trends for these groups were determined by using comparison groups; the comparisons are included in the appendices. Changes in the characteristics of both groups of women receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children and the changes in their economic conditions are described.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-94-92.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Demographics, Employment, Family income, Single mothers, Single parent families, Statistics

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1994. Welfare to work: Current AFDC program not sufficiently focused on employment. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 41 pp.

Annotation: This report assesses the progress the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS) program has made in 1) serving an increasingly larger portion of the Aid to Families with Dependent Children caseload, especially those who are at risk of long welfare stays, and 2) ensuring that program participants get work and leave Aid to Families with Dependent Children. It combines the preliminary results from several studies currently being conducted with findings from previously published GAO reports and other current research.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-95-28.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Employment, Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS), Vocational education, Welfare reform

Strawn J, Dacey S, McCart L. 1994. Final report: The National Governors' Association survey of state welfare reforms. Washington, DC: National Governors' Association, ca. 70 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the findings of a National Governors' Association (NGA) survey on state initiatives to reduce reliance on welfare programs. The report provides a brief history of programs such as Aid to Families with Dependent Children, and an overview of the issues involved in reforming the welfare system. Survey questions focused on ways to reduce penalties for working, enforce child support, transfer benefits electronically, support two-parent families, improve access to child care and health services, and create more jobs for welfare recipients. The results are presented in a tabular format that includes a brief description of each initiative, a contact name and phone number, the initiative's status, and the proportion of the state's caseload affected by the changes. Tables cover treatment of earnings and assets, child support enforcement and paternity establishment, electronic benefit transfer, changes to support intact families, transitional child care and Medicaid, job creation for Aid to Families with Dependent Children recipients, time limits on Aid to Families with Dependent Children benefits, school attendance and completion, immunization and other health care provisions, community service, food stamp conversion to cash benefits or wage subsidies, and family caps on Aid to Families with Dependent Children benefits.

Contact: National Governors Association, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Secondary Telephone: Contact Phone: (301) 498-3738 Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, State initiatives, State programs, Surveys, Welfare programs, Welfare reform

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1994. Welfare to work: Most AFDC training programs not emphasizing job placement. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 96 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS) program, which was created in 1988 to strengthen work requirements in the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program. The report provides an overview to the JOBS program, considers examples of employment-focused programs, notes that most programs do not focus strongly on employment, and cites factors that prevent program administrators from placing participants in positions. Appendices include federal rules governing work activities for recipients, a sample of questionnaire, a description of the methodology used to gather information, and comments from the Administration for Children and Families.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-95-113.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Employment programs, Federal programs, Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS), Program evaluation, Vocational education

Maynard R, ed. 1993. Building self-sufficiency among welfare-dependent teenage parents: Lessons from the Teenage Parent Demonstration. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research , 83 pp.

Annotation: This report synthesizes the results of the first phase of a major, multipart evaluation of the Teenage Parent Demonstration initiative, giving details of the characteristics of the clients and the requirements of the program. Case managers helped the adolescents with problems, such as transportation and child care, while they continued their education or found work. Statistics are given on the participants' demography and on the program's costs and results at 30 months.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com $8.00 plus $2.50 shipping and handling. Also available from ERIC. Document Number: PR 93-28.

Keywords: Demonstration programs, Adolescent employment, Adolescent parents, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Demography, Program evaluation, Statistics, Vocational education

National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations. 1990. ... And access for all: Medicaid and Hispanics. Washington, DC: National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations, 147 pp.

Annotation: This book presents the findings of the first national study of Medicaid and Hispanic communities. Representation, eligibility, spending, innovations, and the application process for Medicaid are issues discussed. Recommendation for categorical qualification, services, and the application process are made.

Contact: National Alliance for Hispanic Health, 1501 16th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-1401, Telephone: (202) 387-5000 Secondary Telephone: (866) 783-2645 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.hispanichealth.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Hispanic Americans, Medicaid, Minority health

Southern Regional Project on Infant Mortality. 1989. An examination of the barriers to accessing WIC, AFDC and Medicaid services. Washington, DC: Southern Regional Project on Infant Mortality, 60 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the findings from site visits to Arkansas, Florida, North Carolina, Texas, and West Virginia to assess policies, practices, and procedures that contribute to and alleviate the problems faced by low-income women in accessing the targeted services. In addition, it summarizes the results of a survey of national organizations on access issues. Barriers were categorized into financing, provider or service delivery issues, program administration or requirements, and client issues. Recommendations and copies of the survey instrument are included.

Keywords: Access to prenatal care, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Infant health, Infant mortality, Maternal health, Medicaid, Planning, Programs, State MCH programs, WIC Program

Whitfill A, Liu J, Johnson K. 1989. The health of America's southern children: Maternal and child health data book. (Special ed.). Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, 123 pp.

Annotation: This book documents the progress made and the progress needed to improve maternal and child health care in the southern states. This report contains an overview of maternal and child health programs in the southern region, health status and health care utilization statistics, data and information on the performance and scope of programs that make health care available to low-income children, and tables which reflect states' performance in improving maternal and child health indicators and in developing adequate maternal and child health programs.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org Available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescents, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Child health, Children, EPSDT, Early intervention, Infant mortality, Migrant health, Prenatal care, Social Security Act, Title V, WIC Program

Brazner K, Gaylord CL. 1986. Medicaid, HMO's and maternal and child health: An assessment of Wisconsin's mandatory HMO enrollment program for AFDC families. Madison, WI: Center for Public Representation, Community Based Maternal and Child Health Project, 149 pp.

Annotation: This research paper is a report on a Medicaid cost containment program in Wisconsin under which recipients of Aid to Families with Dependent Children are required to enroll in health maintenance organizations (HMO) to receive Medicaid health care services. The paper assesses the effect of this Preferred Enrollment Initiative (PEI) on access to quality health care for low-income mothers and children. A review of the positive developments and the problems with the program are covered.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Evaluation, Health maintenance organizations, Mandatory enrollment, Medicaid managed care, State MCH programs

Coburn A. 1986. Impact of Variations in AFDC and Medicaid Eligibility on Prenatal Care Utilization [Final report]. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine,

Annotation: The primary goal of this study was to determine the impact of variations in AFDC and Medicaid eligibility on prenatal care use among low-income women. The study design involved a cross-State comparison of prenatal care utilization in four states. Overall, the results of this study indicated that although Medicaid recipients typically have poorer prenatal care utilization than women with private insurance (i.e., they start care later, have fewer visits, and are more likely to receive "inadequate" care), they do better than they would in the absence of a Medicaid program. The researchers suggested that much remains to be learned about how the characteristics of local health care systems, the administration of State and local income support programs, and health-related attitudes and beliefs affect prenatal care utilization levels among low-income women. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB87-199030.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Health care utilization, Low income groups, Medicaid, Pregnant women, Prenatal care

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.