Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (66 total).

Poisson S. n.d.. Maternal and Child Health Cooperative Agreement [Final report]. Rockville, MD: Reginald S. Lourie Center for Infants and Young Children, 52 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to develop and implement comprehensive and family-centered approaches to early identification, assessment, and treatment of infants and young children who are at risk for or suffering from emotional and/or regulatory difficulties. To this end, the Regional Center for Infants and Young Children: (1) Monitored types of families and children referred to and receiving services from an agency specializing in the early detection of emotional disorders or potential risk; (2) developed principles and technology to identify infants and young children/families at risk for psychosocial and developmental difficulties; (3) developed comprehensive, family-centered approaches to assessment and diagnosis; (4) developed prevention-oriented, family-centered approaches to intervention; (5) developed and disseminated technical assistance and training approaches; (6) engaged State and local maternal and child health (MCH) agencies in the project; and (7) accessed multiple financial resources to support its efforts. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158236.

Keywords: Affective Disorders, Behavioral Disorders, Data Collection, Family-Centered Health Care, High risk groups: Families, High risk infants, Parents, Regulatory Disorders, Screening Tools, Temperament

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find mental health care, services, and support and websites about emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens. A separate section presents websites about babies and young kids. Another lists websites for teens. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Affective disorders, Behavior development, Behavior disorders, Bibliographies, Children, Electronic publications, Emotional development, Family support services, Mental health, Psychological needs, Social behavior

Moses K, Klebonis J, Simons D. 2014. Developing health homes for children with serious emotional disturbance: Considerations and opportunities. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 5 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief highlights health home opportunities for children with serious emotional disturbance (SED) and presents considerations to help states develop models that address this population’s unique needs. Topics include identifying the target population; developing provider standards; and defining health home services including care coordination, individual and family supports, and community and social supports. Additional topics include chronicity of illness in children vs. adults and opportunities to provide intensive care coordination, build care management entities, and avoid duplication of services and payment.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Affective disorders, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Medicaid managed care, Service coordination, Special health care needs, State programs, Young adults

Hoffman SM. 2010. Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program: Final report. Boise, ID: Treasure Valley Children's Mental Health Project [dba MATCH], 6 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a 2004-2010 program to improve access to mental health services, particularly psychiatric services for low income children, by increasing and strengthening the capacity of primary care physicians in the provision of medical care for children with emotional and mental disorders. Report contents include a description of the purpose of the project, goals and objectives, methodology, evaluation, results and outcomes, dissemination or utilization of the results, and future plans and followup. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Affective disorders, Children, Final reports, Idaho, Low income groups, Mental disorders, Primary care, Professional training, Referrals

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2010. The mental and emotional well-being of children: A portrait of states and the nation 2007. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 60 pp.

Annotation: This chartbook presents a range of indicators on the health and well-being of children who have been diagnosed with emotional, behavioral, or developmental conditions on the national level. For each state, the book shows the prevalence of seven conditions (grouped together) and the major demographic characteristics of children who have at least one of the conditions. The analyses delineate relationships among the conditions, children's socioeconomic characteristics, and access to health care. Technical appendices at the end of the book present information about the survey methodology, sample, and questions. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCH00318.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent mental health, Affective disorders, Behavior problems, Child mental health, Developmental disabilities, National surveys, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical data

Lorenzo SB. 2007–. Emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in children and adolescents: Knowledge path (3rd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This knowledge path is a guide to resources that analyze data, describe effective programs, and report on policy and research aimed at improving access to and quality of care for children and adolescents with emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges. Resources tap into the heath, education, social services, and juvenile justice literature. The knowledge path is aimed at health professionals, program administrators, policymakers, educators, and community advocates. Separate briefs present resources for families and schools. The path is updated periodically. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Adolescents, Affective disorders, Behavior development, Behavior disorders, Bibliographies, Child mental health, Children, Consumer education materials, Electronic publications, Emotional development, Knowledge paths, Mental disorders, Resources for professionals

Ireys HT, Pires S, Lee M. 2006. Public financing of home and community services for children and youth with serious emotional disturbances: Selected state strategies. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 56 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a study of selected public financing mechanisms that states have used to pay for intensive home and community services for children and youth with serious emotional disturbances (SED). It outlines several key public and Medicaid strategies for funding home and community services for children with SED. Contents include critical background issues in mechanisms for financing services for youth with SED and their families, state approaches to financing services, and strengths and weaknesses of selected financing mechanisms. Synthesis and implications are provided. The appendices cite examples from selected states in three categories, values and principles supporting the systems of care approach, and costs of services provided through waivers.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Adolescents, Affective disorders, Child mental health, Children, Community based services, Family support services, Health care financing, Mental health services, State initiatives

Zero to Three. 2005. DC: 0-3R: Diagnostic classification of mental health and developmental disorders of infancy and early childhood. (Rev. ed.). Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 75 pp.

Annotation: This edition, for mental health and other professionals, draws on empirical research and clinical practice since the 1994 edition and provides updated material. Topics include recognizing mental health and developmental challenges in young children, understanding how relationships and environmental factors contribute to mental health and developmental disorders, using diagnostic criteria effectively for classification and interventions, and working more effectively with parents and other professionals to develop effective treatment plans. Classifications cover clinical disorders, relationships, medical and developmental disorders and conditions, psychosocial stressors, and emotional and social functioning. Appendices provide information on prioritizing diagnostic classification and planning intervention, a description of the process of revising DC:0-3, and a list of the task force members. References conclude the edition.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-943657-90-5.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Child development, Child development disorders, Child mental health, Developmental screening, Diagnosis, Early intervention services, Infant development, Mental health, Resources for professionals, Screening

Stroul BA, Pires SA, Armstrong MI. 2004. Health Care Reform Tracking Project: Tracking state managed care reforms as they affect children and adolescents with behavioral health disorders and their families—2003 state survey. Tampa, FL: University of South Florida, Research and Training Center for Children's Mental Health, 180 pp.

Annotation: This report represents one component of the Health Care Reform Tracking Project -- a 5-year project designed to track and analyze the impact of public sector managed care reforms on children and adolescents with emotional and substance abuse problems and their families. The report focuses on surveys of all the states. The report, which includes an executive summary, also contains information about state managed care initiatives, populations covered by managed care reform, managed care entities, service coverage and capacity, special provisions for youth with serious and complex behavioral health needs, financing and risk, clinical decision-making and management mechanisms, access, service coordination, early identification and intervention, cultural competence, family involvement, providers, accountability, the State Children's Health Insurance Program, and Concluding Observations. Two appendices provide the survey instrument and a list of technical assistance materials. Data are presented in tables throughout the report. The report also includes a child welfare special analysis.

Contact: National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, 3300 Whitehaven Street, Suite 3300, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: childrensmh@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchdtacenter.georgetown.edu/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Accountability, Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Affective disorders, Child behavior, Child welfare, Children, Culturally competent services, Early intervention, Emotional instability, Ethics, Families, Financing, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Managed care, State health insurance programs, State initiatives, Substance abuse, Surveys

Pandina NG, Burchard JD, Tighe TA, Wise M, Ursu K, Morse M. 2004. Children's Upstream Services: Qualitative evaluation report. Waterbury, VT: Vermont Department of Developmental and Mental Health Services, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report identifies factors critical to positive outcomes from the points of view of parents and other caregivers whose families received early childhood mental health services from the Vermont Children's UPstream Services (CUPS) initiative. CUPS is part of a statewide effort to develop an integrated system of care and is aimed at families of young children experiencing or at risk for experiencing severe emotional disturbance. The report presents qualitative information obtained from parent interviews conducted as part of an in-depth CUPS evaluation. Detailed responses regarding interactions with CUPS are provided, including a number of verbatim accounts describing how the CUPS program has affected families' lives. A summary of the methodology used as well as some interpretation of the data are included, as well.

Contact: Vermont Department of Mental Health, 108 Cherry Street-PO Box 70, Burlington, VT 05402, Telephone: (802) 652-2000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 464-4343 Fax: 802- 652-2005 Web Site: http://mentalhealth.vermont.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Behavior disorders, Caregivers, Community programs, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Evaluation, Families, Health care systems, Initiatives, Interviews, Mental health services, Parents, Vermont

Humensky J, Ireys HT, Wickstrom S, Rheault P. 2004. Mental health services for children with special health care needs in commercial managed care, 1999-2001. Washington, DC: Mathematica Policy Research, 45 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses the following questions: (1) what proportion of privately insured children with special health care needs (CSHCN) have emotional and behavioral disorders, and how does this vary across time and demographic characteristics of children?, (2) how do the total and service-specific per member per month (PMPM) costs of care for children with behavioral or emotional disorders compare with children in the sample?, (3) what proportion of the PMPM costs were paid by subscribers through copayments and deductibles? Did this change over time?, and (4) what types of physicians prescribe psychiatric medication for children with emotional and behavioral disorders, and what kinds of medications do they prescribe? The report includes a description of the methods, results, and implications of the findings for the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, health plans, and families. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. The report includes two appendices: (1) alternative methods for identifying CSHCN with emotional and behavioral disorders and (2) list of psychiatric drugs by category. The report includes references. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Behavior disorders, Children with special health care needs, Costs, Demography, Families, Health insurance, Mental health, Prescription drugs, Research

Gordon LJ. Tullis K, Hanson A, eds. 2004. Building on family strengths: Research and services in support of children and their families—2003 conference proceedings. Portland, OR: Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 204 pp.

Annotation: These conference proceedings describe a conference held June 26-28, 2003 in Portland, OR, to share and learn about current research and best practices for supporting children and youth with emotional and behavioral challenges and their families. Topics include systems of care, wraparound processes, promoting children's mental health in early childhood settings; youth violence; perceptions of service delivery; links between successful inclusion and family support in child care centers; understanding collaboration in systems of care; case studies, family support, family participation, and individualized services and support planning. The proceedings include keynote and plenary transcripts, with presentation summaries including presentation PowerPoint slides and links to corresponding Web-based versions of individual presentations, along with a complete conference agenda with contact information for lead presenters. The appendix includes the conference agenda and the report concludes with an index.

Contact: National Wraparound Initiative, Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207-0751, Telephone: (503) 725-8236 Fax: (503) 725-4180 E-mail: janetw@pdx.edu Web Site: http://www.nwi.pdx.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Behavior problems, Case studies, Child care, Child mental health, Collaboration, Conference proceedings, Early intervention services, Family centered services, Family support services, Individualized family service plans, Model programs, Research

Koyanagi C, Semansky R. 2003. Assessing child mental health services in New York: A report on three focus groups. Washington, DC: Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report is part of an investigation of the impact of expanding child mental health services for children with serious mental disorders in Medicaid on the actual availability of services to children. It reports on focus groups that were held in New York to assess family satisfaction with child mental health services provided by Medicaid. Topics of findings include access, availability and appropriateness of services; interagency collaboration; and provider issues. It also provides policy recommendations. Appendices provide the focus group methodology and data tables.

Contact: Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, 1101 15th Street, N.W., Suite 1212, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 467-5730 Secondary Telephone: (202) 467-4232 Fax: (202) 223-0409 E-mail: communications@bazelon.org Web Site: http://www.bazelon.org $15.00 plus shipping.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Child mental health, Evaluation, Focus groups, Mental health services, New York

Bryson C. [2002]. Children with serious emotional disturbance and managed care: Final report. Nashville, TN: Tennessee Voices for Children, 40 pp.

Annotation: This final report describes the Tennessee project to study the TennCare Partners Program, the mental health arm of Tennessee's public managed care program, and how families with children who are severely emotionally disturbed were under-served by the program. Topics also include ways to promote parent-professional interagency planning to meet the needs of children with serious emotional disturbance and their families, and to increase their access to a community-based, family-centered, culturally competent continuum of services. Report sections include an abstract, the project narrative including the purpose, goals, and objectives; methodology; evaluation; results and conclusions; a list of publications and products generated from the project; dissemination and utilization of results; future plans and follow-up; and types and amount of support and resources needed to replicate the project. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Tennessee Voices for Children, 701 Bradford Avenue, Nashville, TN 37204, Telephone: (615) 269-7551 Fax: (615) 269-8914 E-mail: TVC@tnvoices.org Web Site: http://www.Tnvoices.org

Keywords: Access to health care, Affective disorders, Child mental health, Community based services, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Family centered services, Final reports, MCH research, Managed care, Mental disorders, Parent professional relations, Program evaluation, Service integration, Tennessee

U.S. Center for Mental Health Services. 2002-2011. Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and Their Families Program: Evaluation findings--Annual report to Congress. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Mental Health Services, frequency varies.

Annotation: This report presents findings based on the mandated national evaluation of the Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and their Families Program (also known as the Children’s Mental Health Initiative (CMHI))-- a federally-funded initiative that supports systems of care for community-based mental health services for children, youth, and their families. The report presents descriptive data collected over time on children and youth enrolled in 68 grantee communities. A glossary of terms is included in Appendix C.

Contact: SAMHSA's National Mental Health Information Center, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, P.O. Box 42557, Washington, DC 20015, Telephone: (800) 789-2647 Secondary Telephone: (866) 889-2647 Fax: (240) 221-4295 E-mail: info@mentalhealth.org Web Site: http://store.samhsa.gov/home Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Affective disorders, Children, Evaluation, Federal programs, Health care systems, Mental disorders, Mental health services

Burns B, Hoagwood K. 2002. Community treatment for youth: Evidence-based interventions for severe emotional and behavioral disorders. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 390 pp. (Innovations in practice and service delivery with vulnerable populations)

Annotation: This book discusses evidence-based interventions for children and adolescents with severe emotional and behavioral disorders. It is divided into four parts: (1) context; (2) comprehensive interventions; (3) targeted interventions in education, substance abuse, and mental health, and (4) conclusion and commentary. Topics include case management, multisystemic therapy, mentoring, family support and education, special education best practices, and policy implications. One chapter provides an annotated review of psychosocial and psychopharmacological interventions in table format focussing on four common childhood disorders or related symptom patterns. References, information about the contributors, and an index conclude this book.

Contact: Oxford University Press, 198 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (800) 451-7556 Secondary Telephone: (212)726-6000 E-mail: custserv@oup.com Web Site: http://www.oup.com/us Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-19-513457-5.

Keywords: Evidence based medicine, Adolescent mental health, Affective disorders, Child mental health, Community mental health centers, Family support services, Mentors, Psychosocial development, Special education, Youth development

Koyanagi C, Semansky R. 2002. Assessing child mental health services in the Oregon Health Plan: A report on three focus groups. Washington, DC: Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report is part of an investigation of the impact of expanding child mental health services for children with serious mental disorders in Medicaid on the actual availability of services to children. It reports on focus groups that were held in Oregon to assess family satisfaction with child mental health services provided by Medicaid, primarily by the Oregon Health Plan's managed care system. Topics of findings include access, availability and appropriateness of services; interagency collaboration; provider issues; and health plan issues. It also discusses differences between plans, areas of accomplishment, challenges, and policy recommendations. Appendices provide the focus group methodology and data tables.

Contact: Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, 1101 15th Street, N.W., Suite 1212, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 467-5730 Secondary Telephone: (202) 467-4232 Fax: (202) 223-0409 E-mail: communications@bazelon.org Web Site: http://www.bazelon.org $15.00 plus shipping.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Child mental health, Evaluation, Focus groups, Managed care, Mental health services, Oregon

Halfon N, Zepeda A, Inkelas M. 2002. Mental health services for children in foster care. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities, 13 pp. (Health services for children in foster care: Policy brief; no. 4)

Annotation: This policy brief examines the role of mental health agencies in the provision of mental health services to children in the child welfare system, including roles of the agencies, barriers to organizing and delivering services, and funding sources used. Key recommendations and action steps are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities, University of California, Los Angeles, 10990 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 900, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-2583 Fax: (310) 312-9210 E-mail: chcfc@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthychild.ucla.edu

Keywords: Affective disorders, Children, Foster care, Mental health agencies, Mental health services

Lazear KJ, Worthington J. 2002. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) family impact study. Tampa, FL: University of South Florida, Research and Training Center for Children's Mental Health, 89 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the findings of a study of 40 families over a 22 month period to examine the impact of changes enacted in 1996 in the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program that altered definitions and procedures for families with children with serious emotional disturbances. Categories of findings include who the children and families are, the importance of the SSI financial benefit, the impact on families of the SSI changes and process, Medicaid and health care coverage, coping mechanisms of families, and the SSI process. The report also describes the methodology, the sites, the families, implications of the study, and future directions.

Contact: University of South Florida, Research and Training Center for Children's Mental Health, 13301 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33612-3809, Telephone: (813) 974-4661 Fax: (813) 974-6257 E-mail: kutash@fmhi.usf.edu Web Site: http://rtckids.fmhi.usf.edu/ Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Behavior disorders, Children with special health care needs, Families, Family support programs, Federal legislation, Federal programs, Mental disorders, Studies, Supplemental security income

Worthington JE, Hernandez M, Friedman B, Uzzell, D, Joseph R, MacAlister JE, Armstrong K, Boterf E, Goff T, Tolin C. 2001. Learning from families: Identifying service strategies for success. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research, Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice, 85 pp. (Systems of care: Promising practices in children's mental health, 2001 series; v. 2)

Annotation: This volume is second in the 2001 series of monographs of the Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and Their Families Program, a federal grant program that assists communities in building fully inclusive organized systems of care for children who are experiencing a serious emotional disturbance and their families. The monograph reports on a study of grantee programs which aimed to identify what constitutes successful treatment from the point of view of the families and the services that promote success for children and families being served by a system of care. Appendices include grant community profiles and benefits of parent involvement in the study.

Contact: American Institutes for Research, Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 944-5400 Secondary Telephone: (888) 457-1551 Fax: E-mail: center@air.org Web Site: http://cecp.air.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Children, Families, Federal programs, Outcome evaluation, Program evaluation, Treatment outcome

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.