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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (23 total).

Harris JL, Romo-Palafox M, Choi YY, Kibwana A. 2019. Children's Drink FACTS 2019: Sales, nutrition, and marketing of children's drinks. Hartford, CT: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, 78 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on children’s drinks, defined as drinks intended for children ages 2–11 to consume, as indicated on brand websites. The report identifies and analyzes sweetened children’s drinks in the fruit drink, flavored water, and drink mix categories as well as those without added sweeteners (added sugars or low-calorie sweeteners) in the 100 percent juice, juice/water blend, and plain water/seltzer categories. Topics include the children’s drink market, children’s drink nutrition, on-package marketing, and advertising.

Contact: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, University of Connecticut, One Constitution Plaza, Suite 600, Hartford, CT 06511, Telephone: (860) 380-1000 Fax: (860) 509-0009 E-mail: rudd.center@uconn.edu Web Site: http://www.uconnruddcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advertising, Artificial sweeteners, Marketing, Nutrition, Oral health, Sugar

Harris JL, Schwartz MB, Shehan C, Hyary M, Appel J, Haraghey K, Li X. 2015. Snack FACTS 2015: Evaluating snack food nutrition and marketing to youth. Hartford, CT: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, 102 pp.

Annotation: This report presents an analysis of snack food marketing in the United States. Topics include the current status of the nutritional quality of snack foods marketed to children and adolescents on television, the internet, and in schools; the amount of snack food advertising in all media by brand, company, and category including comparisons from five years earlier, and young people's exposure to snack food advertising on television and the internet.

Contact: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, University of Connecticut, One Constitution Plaza, Suite 600, Hartford, CT 06511, Telephone: (860) 380-1000 Fax: (860) 509-0009 E-mail: rudd.center@uconn.edu Web Site: http://www.uconnruddcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advertising, Children, Internet, Measures, Nutrition, Schools, Snacks, Television, Trends

Legacy. 2014. Vaporized: E-cigarettes, advertising, and youth. Washington, DC: [American Legacy Foundation], 22 pp.

Annotation: This paper presents findings from two studies on electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) advertising and its impact on youth. Contents include information about use and awareness among adolescents and young adults, and industry advertising. Topics include awareness of e-cigarette advertising, spending across channels and by brand, and advertising reach across TV and print among adolescents ages 12-17 and among young adults ages 18-24. The appendix contains information on the demographics of study participants and the e-cigarette brands included in the analysis.

Contact: Truth Initiative, 900 G Street, N.W., Fourth Floor, Washington, DC 20001, Web Site: http://truthinitiative.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advertising, Consumer protection, Mass media, Nicotine, Poisons, Research, Smoking, Statistical data, Young adults

Federal Trade Commission, Bureau of Consumer Protection and Bureau of Economics. 2014. Self-regulation in the alcohol industry: Report of the Federal Trade Commission. Washington, DC: Federal Trade Commission, 49 pp.

Annotation: This report documents alcohol industry self-regulatory initiatives designed to address concerns about underage exposure to alcohol marketing. Contents include data about how industry members allocate marketing expenditures; compliance with its advertising placement standard; online and digital marketing, including privacy practices; product placements in entertainment media; and external review of complaints related to self-regulatory code compliance. The report provides the data in an aggregate, anonymous fashion.

Contact: Federal Trade Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20580, Telephone: (202) 326-2222 E-mail: webmaster@ftc.gov Web Site: http://www.ftc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advertising, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Consumer protection, Costs, Data, Industry, Marketing, Regulations

American Academy of Family Physicians. 2014. Tar Wars®. Shawnee Mission, KS: American Academy of Family Physicians, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help coordinators, presenters, and teachers implement a tobacco-education program for students in grades 4 and 5. The program teaches students about the short-term consequences of tobacco use, the cost associated with using tobacco products, and the advertising techniques used by the tobacco industry to market their products to young people. Contents include guides containing tips for coordinating the program; program and classroom activities in English and Spanish for presenters; and tips for teachers, including forms to request a presentation and a questionnaire to provide feedback. Information for parents is included. A student contest is included as an optional activity.

Contact: American Academy of Family Physicians, P.O. Box 11210, Shawnee Mission, KS 66207-1210, Telephone: (913) 906-6000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 274-2237 Fax: (913) 906-6075 E-mail: contactcenter@aafp.org Web Site: http://www.aafp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advertising, Consumer education, Family medicine, Health education, Nicotine, Oral health, Prevention programs, Resources for professionals, School age children, Schools, Spanish language materials, Teaching, Tobacco use

Georgetown University, Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth. 2010. Youth exposure to alcohol advertising on television, 2001 to 2009. Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, 20 pp.

Annotation: This report presents an overview of alcohol product advertising on television from 2001 to 2009 and discusses the alcohol industry's 30% threshold (i.e., an agreement to limit alcohol advertising to programs in which underage viewers make up a maximum of 30%), as well as adolescent exposure to alcohol product advertising on television.

Contact: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Georgetown University, 3300 Whitehaven Street, N.W., Suite 5000, Box 571444, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-1019 E-mail: info@camy.org Web Site: http://camy.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Advertising, Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Television

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 2010. How tobacco smoke causes disease: What it means to you–A report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes scientific findings about how deadly cigarettes are, how quickly they can damage the body, and ways that tobacco companies have altered cigarettes to make them more addictive. Topics include the chemicals in tobacco smoke; nicotine and addiction; how smoking causes cancer and circulatory and respiratory damage, harms reproduction and children's health, and makes diabetes harder to control; and how secondhand smoke harms nonsmokers. Information about the reasons people chose to quit smoking and resources to help them is included.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Advertising, Child health, Consumer education materials, Drug addiction, Nicotine, Oral health, Research, Smoking, Smoking cessation

Bales SN, O'Neil M. 2008. Gaining support for teen families: Mapping the perceptual hurdles—A report from the FrameWorks Institute to Healthy Teen Network. Washington, DC: FrameWorks, 50 pp. (A Frameworks research report)

Annotation: This report analyzes the dominant modes of thinking on adolescent parenting as found in the media and in the materials of advocaty organizations. It offers reasons and ways to change certain dominant modes of thinking, and it makes suggestions for further research regarding adolescent parenting.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Advertising, Advocacy groups, Information dissemination, Mass media, Youth

Chester J, Montgomery K. 2007. Interactive food and beverage marketing: Targeting children and youth in the digital age. Berkeley, CA: Berkeley Media Studies Group, 97 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on how advertising that promotes foods high in calories and low in nutrient content to young people contributes to the increasing incidence of childhood and adolescent obesity. The report outlines the problem, discusses different types of marketing strategies used to engage children and adolescents, and provides suggestions for creating a healthy media environment for the 21st century. Citations are included. The report includes one appendix: multicultural marketing in the digital age.

Contact: Berkeley Media Studies Group, 2140 Shattuck Avenue, Suite 804, Berkeley, CA 94704, Telephone: (510) 204-9700 Fax: (510) 204-9710 E-mail: bmsg@bmsg.org Web Site: http://www.bmsg.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Advertising, Child behavior, Child health, Mass media, Nutrition, Obesity

Gantz W, Schwartz N, Angelini JR, Rideout V. 2007. Food for thought: Television food advertising to children in the United States. Washington, DC: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report paints a picture of the current landscape of food advertising on television to children, to help inform the efforts of policymakers and the food and media industries, and to provide a benchmark for measuring change in the years ahead. Chapter topics include an overview of non-programming content on television, food advertising on television, and the amount of food advertising seen by children. Information is provided on the study methodology, statistical data are included in tables, and references conclude the report.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, Washington, DC Office/Public Affairs Center, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.kff.org/about/bjcc/bjcc_floor.cfm Available from the website.

Keywords: Advertising, Children, Food habits, Media campaigns, Television

Rideout V. 2007. Parents, children, and media: A Kaiser Family Foundation survey. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 38 pp.

Annotation: This report is based on a national survey of 1,008 parents of children and adolescents ages 2-17, along with information gleaned from a series of focus groups held with parents across the country. The survey explores such issues as media content, media ratings and the V-Chip, media monitoring, educational media, and the Internet. The report discusses the survey methodology and provides information about survey findings in the following categories: (1) inappropriate content in the media, (2) advertising, obesity, and attention deficit disorder, (3) educational media, (4) media monitoring and influence, (5) media ratings and the V-Chip, and (6) the Internet.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Advertising, Attention deficit disorder, Child behavior, Educational materials, Focus groups, Mass media, Obesity, Parents, Surveys, World wide web

California Pan-Ethnic Health Network and Consumers Union. 2005. Out of balance: Marketing of soda, candy, snacks, and fast foods drowns out healthful messages. Oakland, CA: California Pan-Ethnic Health Network; San Francisco, CA: Consumers Union, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report uses recently released data to highlight the way that food, beverage, and fast food advertising my be contributing to the rise in obesity in the United States. The report discusses the relationship between eating trends and advertising trends, food and beverage marketing expenditures vs. expenditures of the 5 A Day program, unmeasured media (e.g., direct mail, couponing, special events), marketing to communities of color, marketing to children, and the 5 A Day Program. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. Recommendations and endnotes are included.

Contact: Consumers Union, West Coast Regional Office, 1535 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103-2512, Telephone: (415) 431-6747 Fax: (415) 431-0906 Web Site: http://www.consumersunion.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advertising, Child health, Costs, Food habits, Health, Mass media, Minority health, Obesity, Trends

Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth. 2004. Clicking with Kids: Alcohol Marketing and youth on the Internet . Washington, DC: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, 30 pp.

Annotation: This report offers a cataloguing of features found on alcohol Web sites and believed to be attractive and appealing to underage youth, as well as an assessment of how easily these sites can be accessed. In addition, the report provides an analysis of underage traffic to alcohol Web sites. The report presents the key findings of a study conducted by the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, discusses youth access to the Internet and underage access to alcohol Web sites; describes the kinds of games, wallpaper, and screen savers offered by alcohol Web sites; discusses the use of cartoons in alcohol Internet advertising; examines the ability of parental controls to block youth access to alcohol Web sites; and offers conclusions. The report includes three appendices: (1) methodology, (2) Web sites used for content review and access tests, and (3) Web sites used for youth visit analysis. The report includes photographs of Web site images. Some information is presented in tables.

Contact: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Georgetown University, 3300 Whitehaven Street, N.W., Suite 5000, Box 571444, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-1019 E-mail: info@camy.org Web Site: http://camy.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advertising, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Internet, Marketing, Parents

Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth. 2004. Youth exposure to radio advertising for alcohol—United States, Summer 2003. Washington, DC: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, 3 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study that analyzed a sample of more than 50, 000 radio advertisements placements for 25 leading brands of alcohol in 104 U.S. radio markets in the summer of 2003. The purpose of the study was to assess youth exposure to alcohol advertising relative to the exposure of young adults and all adults over age 21. The report describes the study methods and presents the results. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. The report includes an editorial note and concludes with a list of references.

Contact: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Georgetown University, 3300 Whitehaven Street, N.W., Suite 5000, Box 571444, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-1019 E-mail: info@camy.org Web Site: http://camy.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Adults, Advertising, Alcohol consumption behavior, Marketing, Marketing, Radio, Young adults

American Lung Association. 2004. Trends in tobacco use. New York, NY: American Lung Association, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report primarily comprises tables and figures that present information from national surveys and studies on morbidity and mortality due to tobacco use in the United States. The report focuses primarily on cigarettes, but statistical information on other tobacco products is also included, and environmental tobacco smoke is discussed. The report begins with text discussing the following topics: mortality, consumption, prevalence of cigarette use among adults, prevalence of other tobacco products among adults, marijuana, prevalence of cigarette use among adolescents, smoking during pregnancy, prevalence of smoking cessation among adults, prevalence of smoking cessation among adolescents, tobacco advertising and promotion, state laws on smoking, environmental tobacco smoke, and international cigarette smoking prevalence. Footnotes are included. The text is followed by tables and figures.

Contact: American Lung Association, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 785-3355 Secondary Telephone: (800) 548-8252 Fax: (202) 452-1805 E-mail: info@lungusa.org Web Site: http://www.lungusa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adults, Advertising, Marijuana, Morbidity, Mortality, Passive smoking, Smokeless tobacco, Smoking, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, State legislation, Statistical data, Tobacco use, Trends

Towey KJ, Fleming M, eds. 2004. Policy and resource guide: Adolescent overweight and obesity, physical activity and nutrition. Chicago, IL: American Medical Association National Coalition on Adolescent Health, 39 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide includes policy and programmatic information related to adolescent overweight, obesity, physical activity, and nutrition. The guide presents key facts and provides general information on obesity as a public health problem. The guide also discusses diet and nutrition; education and training; food labeling and advertising; health insurance and reimbursement for treatment of obesity and overweight; physical activity and sports; school nutrition; screening, evaluation, and treatment; and special populations. Resources are provided. The guide includes four appendices: (1) organizations of the AMA National Coalition on Adolescent Health, (2) the Partners in Program Planning for Adolescent Health Initiative, (3) practical concerns and solutions, and (4) roles for the professional. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Medical Association, 515 North State Street, Chicago, IL 60610, Telephone: (800) 621-8335 Fax: Web Site: http://www.ama-assn.org Available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Advertising, Education, Health insurance, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Public health, Public policy, Reimbursement, School health, Screening, Sports, Training, Treatment

Fleming M, Towey K, eds. 2003. Educational Forum on Adolescent Health: Youth drinking patterns and alcohol advertising—Proceedings. Chicago, IL: American Medical Association, 93 pp.

Annotation: This publication contains presentations from speakers at the American Medical Association Educational Forum on Adolescent Health: Youth Drinking Patterns and Alcohol Advertising, held on November 6, 2003. The publication also includes bibliographies, an audience participation and questions section, a future research and action section, references, and resources. The content is intended to inform the public campaign to raise awareness of alcohol industry advertising practices and to reduce underage drinking. The publication includes two appendices: (1) attendees/groups represented and (2) American Medical Association Policy.

Contact: American Medical Association, 515 North State Street, Chicago, IL 60610, Telephone: (800) 621-8335 Fax: Web Site: http://www.ama-assn.org

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Advertising, Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Conference proceedings

Perry M, Smith VK, Smith CN, Chang C. 2000. Marketing Medicaid and CHIP: A study of state advertising campaigns. Washington, DC: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 40 pp.

Annotation: This study is a nationwide analysis of states' advertising campaigns for children's health coverage programs. The study, which is based on an analysis of primary print, television, and radio ads submitted by 38 states, identifies themes that cut across state's outreach materials. It reveals common messages, themes, and images that states are using to promote enrollment in Medicaid and state child health insurance programs (CHIP). The study also contains suggestions, based on interviews with state officials and past survey and focus group research, for pushing these campaigns further and for increasing CHIP and Medicaid enrollment.

Keywords: Advertising campaigns, Children's Health Insurance Program, Comparative analysis, Medicaid, Reports, State programs

Maibach E, Parrott RL, eds. 1995. Designing health messages: Approaches from communication theory and public health practice. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 304 pp.

Annotation: This book of essays examines the theory and practice of health message design. The book considers several theories of communication and how those theories apply in health messages. Also included is information on audience centered strategies, use of databases, and recent developments in informing patients about their prescription drugs.

Contact: Sage Publications, 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-2218, Telephone: (805) 499-9774 Secondary Telephone: (800)818-7243 Fax: (805) 499-0871 E-mail: order@sagepub.com Web Site: http://www.sagepub.com $24.50 plus $3.50 shipping and handling for the first item and $1.00 for each additional item. Document Number: ISBN 0-8039-5398-4.

Keywords: Advertising, Health promotion, Mass media, Media campaigns, Public service announcements

U.S. Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General. 1989. Surgeon General's Workshop on Drunk Driving: Background papers. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 260 pp. (OSAP prevention library; no. 1)

Annotation: The background papers in this volume were commissioned to provide a foundation for and launch the discussion of the expert panels of the workshop. The authors presented state of the art in the different fields and describe the various attempts throughout the country and world to prevent alcohol-impaired driving. The topics were alcohol beverage control policies, mass communication effects on drinking and driving, epidemiologic perspectives on drunk driving, controlling injuries due to drinking and driving, the effectiveness of legal sanctions in dealing with drinking drivers, issues in the enforcement of impaired driving laws, transportation and alcohol service policies, injury control, youth impaired driving, problems among Native Americans and Alaska Natives, drunk driving among blacks and Hispanics, treatment, and citizen advocacy.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Price unknown.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advertising, Advocacy, Advocacy, Alaska natives, American Indians, Blacks, Business, Consumer education, Criminal justice system, Data, Epidemiology, Hispanic Americans, Impaired driving, Industry, Injury prevention, Intervention, Law enforcement, Legislation, Mass media, Media campaigns, Motor vehicles, Outreach, Policies, Political systems, Prevention, Rehabilitation

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.