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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (48 total).

U.S. Children's Bureau. 2012. The story of the Children's Bureau. [Washington, DC]: Administration for Children and Families, 39 pp.

Annotation: This book covers the 100-year history of the U.S. Children's Bureau dedicated to the welfare of the nation's children. Topics include involvement in issues such as infant mortality, dependent children, child labor hours and conditions, child abuse and neglect prevention, foster care, and adoption services. Contents include collaboration, assistance to states and tribes, research and data, getting the word out, and leadership. A website also presents the Children's Bureau history. A version of the printed history is also available in Spanish at https://cb100.acf.hhs.gov/sites/all/themes/danland/danblog/files/Story_of_CB_Spanish.pdf.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child abuse, Child labor, Child neglect, Child welfare, Children, Federal agencies, Foster care, History, Infant mortality, Infants, Spanish language materials, U. S. Children's Bureau, Welfare reform, Welfare services

Zigler E, Muenchow S, Ruhm CJ. 2012. Time off with baby: Making the case for paid care leave. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 173 pp.

Annotation: This book, which focuses on the importance of paid parental leave after the birth of an infant, weighs the implications of existing research on child health and development along with what is known about the economic impact of parental leave policies as they have evolved in other nations and in the United States. The book defines various types of leave—maternity, paternity, parental, family, and newborn care. It discusses who receives parental leave and why or why not, who benefits from unpaid job protection under the Family and Medical Leave Act, and to what extent private firms are providing these types of leave for the care of infants or newly adopted children. Other practical issues, policy options, and financing mechanisms are also discussed.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org $34.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 9781934019979.

Keywords: Adopted children, Adoption, Child development, Child health, Early childhood development, Economic factors, Families, Family leave, Fathers, Financing, Infants, Legislation, Mothers, Parental leave, Parents, Public policy, Working parents

White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. [2011]. Partnerships for the common good: A partnership guide for faith-based and neighborhood organizations. Washington, DC: White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, 71 pp.

Annotation: This guide. which is geared toward local faith and community leaders, presents opportunities to form partnerships with Centers for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships across government, as well as information about how to apply for federal grants and access capacity-building resources. The guide addresses the following issue areas: adoption, disasters, education, responsible fatherhood, environmentally friendly buildings, healthy children and families, housing opportunities, hunger and nutrition, international relief and development, jobs, veterans and military families, and volunteerism.

Contact: White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, Telephone: (202) 456-3394 E-mail: whpartnerships@who.eop.gov Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ofbnp Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child health, Collaboration, Communities, Disaster planning, Education, Employment, Environment, Families, Fathers, Federal programs, Grants, Housing, Hunger, International health, Manuals, Military, Nutrition, Religious organizations, Volunteers

Children's Bureau Express. 2011-2012. Children's Bureau centennial series. Washington, DC: Children's Bureau, 9 items.

Annotation: This website, which celebrates the 100th birthday of the U.S. Children's Bureau, provides links to recent and upcoming issues of the Children's Bureau Express (CBX), which feature a series of short articles about the political climate and social movements prevalent in the early 20th century that laid the groundwork for the creation of the Children's Bureau. CBX covers news, issues, and trends of interest to professionals and policymakers in the interrelated fields of child abuse and neglect, child welfare, and adoption. LInks to other issues of CBX, as well as other related links, are also provided on the site. Users can subscribe to CBX via the website or search past issues.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Anniversaries, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child welfare, Children, Children's Bureau, Federal agencies, History, Public policy

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2011. Major federal legislation concerned with child protection, child welfare, and adoption. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 23 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes federal legislation that has helped shape the delivery of child welfare services in the United States. It includes a timeline of the federal legislation that has significantly impacted child protection, social welfare, and adoption since 1974. An overview of each act and its major provisions is also included. The online version provides links to the federal legislation.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child protective services, Child welfare, Federal legislation, Service delivery

U.S. Children's Bureau. 2011. Tip sheet for early childhood-child welfare partnership: Policies and programs that promote educational access, stability, and success for vulnerable children and families. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 2 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides information about federal polices and programs that promote access to high-quality, stable early care and education for children in the child welfare system and opportunities for strengthening collaborations between early childhood and child welfare systems. The tip sheet discusses the following topics: (1) Head Start eligibility, (2) child care subsidies, (3) child abuse prevention and treatment, and (4) use of Title IV-E funds. The following opportunities are also presented: (1) the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008, (2) the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program, and (3) state advisory councils.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child abuse, Child care, Child welfare agencies, Collaboration, Costs, Early childhood education, Eligibility, Federal programs, Financing, Foster children, Head Start, Home visiting, Legislation, Prevention, Public policy, Service delivery systems, State programs, Treatment, Young children

Guttmacher Institute. 2010. An overview of minors' consent laws. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 2 pp. (State policies in brief)

Annotation: This document consists primary of a table that contains seven categories of state law that affect minors' right to receive medical care without parental consent. Highlights of the table are also presented in the following areas: contraceptive services, sexually transmitted infection services, prenatal care, adoption, medical care for a child, and abortion.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Access to health care, Adolescent health, Adolescent parents, Adoption, Child health, Contraceptive use, Health services, Informed consent, Parental consent, Prenatal care, Sexually transmitted diseases, State legislation

National Abortion Federation. 2006. Crisis pregnancy centers: An affront to choice. Washington, DC: National Abortion Federation, 18 pp.

Annotation: This report seeks to educate individuals about crisis pregnancy centers (CPCs) and to enable women to make fully informed choices about their reproductive health care. The report explains what CPCs are, what types of strategies the centers use to try to persuade women not to abort their unborn infants, and how the centers are funded. The report also discusses how to combat CPCs.

Contact: National Abortion Federation, 1660 L Street, N.W., Suite 450, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 667-5881 Secondary Telephone: (800) 772-9100 Fax: (202) 667-5890 E-mail: naf@prochoice.org Web Site: http://www.prochoice.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Adoption, Contraception, Misinformation, Pregnancy, Reproductive health, Women's health

Roles P. 2005. Facing teenage pregnancy: A handbook for the pregnant teen [3rd ed]. Washington, DC: Child Welfare League of America, 125 pp.

Annotation: This book is written to help adolescents make their own decisions about their pregnancies. It does not advocate any particular solutions to the dilemma of adolescent pregnancy, but does offers various alternatives as it guides the adolescent through considering each available option. The book is also useful to the adopted adolescent who is troubled by thoughts of being adopted.

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org $12.95.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adoption, Contraception

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1998. Foster care: Implementation of the Multiethnic Placement Act poses difficult challenges. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 68 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information on efforts by federal, state, and local agencies to implement the Multiethnic Placement Act of 1994 in the areas of foster care and adoption placement policy and guidance, and technical assistance. The report also addresses efforts by federal, state and local agencies in these same areas to implement the 1995 amendment to the Act; and the challenges all levels of government face to change placement practices.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-98-204.

Keywords: Adoption, Cultural diversity, Ethnic factors, Federal legislation, Foster care, Guidelines, Reports

Dodson D. 1997. Finding families for waiting kids: The challenge of special needs adoption in the 90's and beyond. Washington, DC: Family Impact Seminar, 67 pp. (Family impact seminars)

Annotation: This paper explores ten themes in the discussion of the child welfare adoption system. These are the relationship between foster care placements and subsequent adoptions, assessment of reunification potential, services for birth families, the disproportionate share of children of color among foster children, recruiting adoptive parents for children with special needs, new forms of adoption, new approaches for out of court cooperative adoption or other agreed-upon permanency plans, legal actions on children's behalf, improving casework on cases of children who eventually need adoption, and tracking and monitoring the progress of children awaiting adoption.

Contact: National Resource Center for Family-Focused Policymaking, 1300 Linden Drive, 120 Human Ecology, Madison, WI 53706, Telephone: (608) 262-8121 Fax: (608) 262-5335 Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child welfare, Conferences, Foster care, Foster children, Reports

Arthur S. 1996. Surviving teen pregnancy: Your choices, dreams and decisions. (Rev.). Buena Park, CA: Morning Glory Press, 190 pp.

Annotation: This book was written for pregnant adolescents to help them understand their options and learn decision making skills. The topics are organized into three main sections, prenatal and postnatal care, making choices about the pregnancy, and making life decisions. The book includes information on prenatal care, infant care, abortion, adoption, parenting, birth control, responding to social pressure, making financial decisions, and life planning skills. An earlier edition of this publication included a teacher's guide and a study/discussion guide.

Contact: Morning Glory Press, 6595 San Haroldo Way, Buena Park, CA 90620-3748, Telephone: (888) 612-8254 Fax: (888) 327-4362 E-mail: info@morningglorypress.com Web Site: http://www.morningglorypress.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-885356-06-4.

Keywords: Abortion, Adoption, Contraception, Decision making skills, Infant care, Life skills, Parenting, Pregnant adolescents, Prenatal care

Merkel-Holguin L. 1996. Children who lose their parents to HIV/AIDS: Agency guidelines for adoptive and kinship placement. Washington, DC: Child Welfare League of America, 117 pp.

Annotation: This publication provides guidelines for agencies involved in placing children whose parents are HIV positive or who have died from AIDS. The introduction explains the rationale of the guidelines and why changes in the HIV/AIDS pandemic make them necessary. Individual chapters address issues such as preparing for the provision of placement services, outreach and support services for parents who are HIV positive, selecting prospective adoptive families, preparing the children and families for adoption, providing support services after the adoption, and becoming active in advocacy and collaboration. Numerous appendices provides lists of support groups, financial information, bibliographies, and other resource lists.

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-87868-631-2.

Keywords: AIDS, Adoption, Children, Guidelines, HIV, Parents, Resources for professionals

Curtis PA, Boyd JD, Liepold M, Petit M. 1996. Child abuse and neglect: A look at the states—The CWLA stat book. Washington, DC: CWLA Press, 158 pp.

Annotation: This compilation presents state statistics on child abuse and neglect, out-of-home care, adoption, finance and administration of state programs, risk factors, and prevention efforts. This title was previously called "Child Welfare Stat Book."

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org $26.95 plus shipping and handling; no shipping and handling if prepaid. Also available on diskette (Excel v.5.0 only) for Macintosh and Windows, call (202) 638-2952 for details. Document Number: ISBN 0-87868-628-2.

Keywords: Administration, Adolescents, Adoption, Budgets, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child welfare, Children, Data, Financing, Maltreated children, Out of home care, Physical abuse, Prevention, Risk factors, Sexual abuse, State government

Lindsay JW. 1996. Pregnant?: Adoption is an option—Making an adoption plan for a child. Buena Park, CA: Morning Glory Press, 222 pp.

Annotation: This book discusses how prospective adolescent parents can plan their child's adoption; it analyzes the difficult feelings that may occur during this period and offers suggestions regarding making the decision to put a child up for adoption. It considers a range of factors which may affect the decision and describes changes which have occurred in the adoption process. It also addresses obtaining counseling, developing an adoption plan, selecting adoptive parents, childbearing and giving up the child, grieving, and recovering. The book emphasizes the open adoption process which allows contact between the birth parents and the adoptive parents.

Contact: Morning Glory Press, 6595 San Haroldo Way, Buena Park, CA 90620-3748, Telephone: (888) 612-8254 Fax: (888) 327-4362 E-mail: info@morningglorypress.com Web Site: http://www.morningglorypress.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-885356-08-0, paper; 1-885356-09-9, cloth.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adoption, Pregnant adolescents, Single mothers

Watson K. 1994. Substitute care providers: Helping abused and neglected children. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, 76 pp. (User manual series)

Annotation: This manual and others in the User Manual Series are designed to provide guidance to professionals involved in the child protection system. This manual focuses on serving abused and neglected children who are in family foster care and adoption. It discusses substitute care and permanency planning; the needs of abused and neglected children and how to meet them; systems, networks, and teams; establishing support for foster parents; review and monitoring; a blueprint for family foster care in the 1990s; and issues in adoption. Appendices include a list of foster parent training programs, a glossary, and a list of resources.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child abuse, Child neglect, Children, Family preservation, Family support, Foster care, Manuals

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1994. Child welfare: HHS begins to assume leadership to implement national and state systems. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 44 pp.

Annotation: This report describes steps the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has taken to provide guidance to states in developing a nationwide adoption and foster care data collection system. Included in the report is a model child welfare information system developed by a work group of several states and DHHS. The system is more comprehensive than the functional requirements established by DHHS.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/AIMD-94-37.

Keywords: Adoption, Child welfare, Federal agencies, Foster care, Information systems, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Holt KA, Langlykke K, eds. 1993. Comprehensive adolescent pregnancy services: A resource guide. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 81 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide lists publications and organizations related to the issue of adolescent pregnancy. Topics include general information; data, needs assessment, and program evaluation; pregnancy prevention; perinatal care; prenatal and infant nutrition; alcohol and other drug use during pregnancy; parenting and child care; and adoption. In addition four types of publications are indexed: consumer materials, curricula, foreign language materials, and videotapes. The two types of organizations listed are commercial publishers of educational materials and nonprofit agencies addressing adolescent pregnancy. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adoption, Bibliographies, Directories, Nutrition, Parenting skills, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Substance use

David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Center for the Future of Children. 1993. Adoption. Los Altos, CA: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Center for the Future of Children, 182 pp. (The future of children; v. 3, no. 1, Spring 1993)

Annotation: This issue of "The Future of Children" contains articles on various aspects of adoption, including adoption law, outcomes of adoption of children with special needs, international adoption, transracial adoption, open adoption, agency adoption, independent adoption, and adoption of drug-exposed children. The purpose of this issue is to identify those areas where significant barriers exist to and in adoption, and to offer suggestions for improvement, where possible.

Contact: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, 343 Second Street, Los Altos, CA 94022, Telephone: (650) 948-7658 E-mail: https://www.packard.org/contact-us Web Site: https://www.packard.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adopted children, Adoption, Children with special health care needs, Drug affected children, Legislation

Cahn K, Johnson P, eds. 1993. Children can't wait: Reducing delays in out-of-home care. Washington, DC: Child Welfare League of America, 144 pp.

Annotation: This book addresses the problem of delays in the adoption process for children in foster care. It looks at the success of four projects in Michigan, Kentucky, Washington, and New York, funded under the Adoption Opportunities program of the U.S. Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Children's Bureau. The Adoption Opportunities grants were intended to reduce the length of time children waited to be legally free, by resolving problems between courts and agencies. The authors also discuss how aggressively this issue can be pursued.

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org Available in libraries. Document Number: No. 5103.

Keywords: Adoption, Child welfare agencies, Federal grants, Foster care, Foster children, Legal issues, Out of home care, Residential care

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.