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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (209 total).

Healthy Teen Network and ETR Associates. n.d.. Weaving science & practice: Frequently asked questions about science-based approaches. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 20 pp.

Annotation: This document describes seven science-based approaches in adolescent pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infection prevention. Topics include assessment, health education and behavior change theory, logic models, science-based programs, adaptation and fidelity, characteristics of promising programs, and process and outcome evaluation. Additional topics include the benefits of using science-based approaches, ten steps for getting to outcomes, and training and technical assistance.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Assessment, Behavior modification, HIV, Health behavior, Health education, Methods, Models, Outcome evaluation, Prevention programs, Process evaluation, Sexually transmitted diseases

American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health. 2020-. [Healthy teeth across generations: Tip sheets for all ages]. Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health, multiple items.

Annotation: This series includes four handouts: (1) Keeping Baby Teeth Healthy, (2) Protecting Young People’s Teeth, (3) Protecting Your Teeth for a Lifetime, and (4) Protect Your Teeth Later in Life. Each tip sheet provides information about how to keep the mouth and teeth healthy during different life stages (e.g., pregnancy, infancy, childhood, adolescence, later years) as well as for a lifetime. The handouts are available in English and in Spanish.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 E-mail: fluoride@aap.org Web Site: http://www.ilikemyteeth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Health promotion, Infant health, Older adults, Consumer education materials, Oral health, Pregnancy, Prevention, Spanish language materials

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2016. Winnable battles final report. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 40 pp.

Annotation: This report describes public health priorities with large-scale impact on health, known effective strategies to address them, and progress towards meeting targeted goals. Contents include visual representations of progress and data trends, as well as summaries of federal contributions associated with each of the following topic areas: tobacco; nutrition, physical activity, and obesity; food safety; health care-associated infections; motor vehicle injuries; adolescent pregnancy; and HIV.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Food safety, Goals, HIV, Health, Infections, Motor vehicle safety, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Tobacco use, Treatments, Trends

Casamassimo P, Holt K, eds. 2016. Bright Futures: Oral health—Pocket guide (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 90 pp.

Annotation: This pocket guide offers health professionals an overview of preventive oral health supervision during five developmental periods: prenatal, infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence. It is designed to help health professionals implement specific oral health guidelines during these periods. For each period, information about family preparation, risk assessment, interview questions, screening, examination, preventive procedures, anticipatory guidance, measurable outcomes, and referrals is discussed. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Assessment, Bright Futures, Children, Dental care, Disease prevention, Guidelines, Health promotion, Infants, Injury prevention, Oral health, Outcome and process assessment, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Preventive health services, Referrals, Resources for professionals, Screening

Smith KV, Dye C, Rotz D, Cook E, Rosinsky K, Scott M. 2016. Final impacts of the Gender Matters Program. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 38 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a large-scale demonstration project and evaluation of Gender Matters (Gen.M), a sexuality education curriculum that aims to reduce adolescent pregnancy and associated sexual risk behaviors, in part by challenging commonly held perceptions of gender roles and promoting healthy, equitable relationships. The study reports final impacts of the program on adolescent sexual risk behaviors and other longer-term outcomes measured 18 months after participants enrolled in the study.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2846 E-mail: oah.gov@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Attitudes, Gender discrimination, Model programs, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Relationships, Risk taking, Sex characteristics, Sexual health

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2016. CDC Division of Adolescent and School Health DASH strategic plan for fiscal years 2015–2020. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 44 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a strategic framework and 5-year plan for maximizing opportunities for primary prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy among adolescents. Contents include the history of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division of Adolescent and School Health (DASH); information about adolescent health and schools as a venue for health promotion and disease prevention among adolescents; and DASH's mission, approach, vision, goals, core business, strategic imperatives, objectives and indicators, strategies and activities, and strategic feedback loop. The appendices contain information about school-based surveillance systems, middle and high school sexual health education topic indicators, and DASH's research agenda.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Federal initiatives, HIV, Health promotion, Primary prevention, School health education, Schools, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases, Strategic plans

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2016. Developing a scope and sequence for sexual health education. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 15 pp.

Annotation: This document describes how to determine the sexual health content and skills that should be taught at each grade level within a school health education curriculum framework to lower students' risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, and unplanned pregnancy. Contents include guidance on using the Health Education Curriculum Analysis Tool (HECAT) to inform the breadth and arrangement of key health topics and concepts across grade levels (scope) and the logical progression of essential health knowledge, skills, and behaviors to be addressed at each grade level (sequence) from pre-kindergarten through the 12th grade. Additional contents include steps to create or revise a sexual health scope and sequence using the HECAT. A brief overview that explains what a scope and sequence is and what it is meant to accomplish is also available.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Curriculum development, HIV, Primary prevention, School districts, School health education, Schools, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 2015, 2013. Tips to help faith leaders and their communities address teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 20 pp.

Annotation: This publication is designed to help religious and secular leaders engage adolescents in conversations about sex and adolescent pregnancy within the context of their religious beliefs. Contents include nine tips to help faith leaders and their communities address adolescent pregnancy. The publication is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Communication, Prevention, Religious beliefs, Sexual behavior, Spanish language materials, Spirituality

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 2014, 2008. Ten tips for parents to help their children avoid teen pregnancy [rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 28 pp.

Annotation: This brochure provides parents, and other caregivers with information about how they can play a role in helping to reduce their adolescent child's risk for becoming pregnant. The brochure is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Power to Decide: The Campaign to Prevent Unplanned Pregnancy, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: info@powertodecide.org Web Site: http://powertodecide.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Parent education, Parent participation, Pregnant adolescents, Prevention, Spanish language materials

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health and Family and Youth Services Bureau. 2014-. Teen pregnancy prevention evidence review. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1 v.

Annotation: This website provides information and resources from an ongoing independent systematic review of the adolescent pregnancy prevention research to identify programs with evidence of effectiveness in reducing adolescent pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, and associated sexual risk behaviors. The website includes information on study quality and program models that have demonstrated positive impacts on sexual risk behavior and sexual health outcomes. Contents include a searchable database of studies included in the review, information about the review process and how the review is conducted, publications written by the review team, answers to frequently asked questions, and contact information for the study team.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Health behavior, Literature reviews, Prevention programs, Program models, Research methodology, Risk factors, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Teen pregnancy prevention: Family resource brief (upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief presents resources about health care for teens and websites for parents, caregivers, and teens about teen pregnancy prevention. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Bibliographies, Contraception, Electronic publications, Families, Pregnant adolescents, Prevention, Sexuality education, Unplanned pregnancy

Solomon-Fears C. 2014. Teenage pregnancy prevention: Statistics and programs. Washington, DC: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service, 25 pp.

Annotation: This report provides statistics on teen pregnancy and births in the United States from 1950-2012, together with information on federal strategies and programs to reduce teen pregnancies. It reviews trends at both the state and national levels; discusses the financial and social costs of teen births; and discusses reasons for the fluctuation in adolescent birth rates over time. The report also describes federal strategies to reduce teen pregnancy during FY1998-FY2014 and includes descriptions of current federal pregnancy prevention programs. In conclusion, the report discusses evidence-based models based on evaluations of teen pregnancy prevention programs

Contact: Federation of American Scientists, 1725 DeSales Street, NW, Suite 600, Washington , DC 20036-4413, Telephone: (202) 546-3300 E-mail: fas@fas.org Web Site: http://www.fas.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Birth rates, Federal programs, Model programs, Pregnancy prevention, Reports, Statistics, Trends

Astone N, Martin S, Breslav L. 2014. Innovations in NYC health and human services policy: Teen pregnancy prevention. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 9 pp.

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Adolescent pregnancy and parenting: Resource brief (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support. 2014. Bronx Teens Connections' Clinic Linkage Model: Connecting young people with clinical sexual and reproductive health services. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support, 2 pp. (Public health practice stories from the field)

Annotation: This document describes the Bronx Teens Connection (BxTC) program of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, a multicomponent initiative to reduce pregnancy rates among adolescent and young adult females ages 15-19. Contents include information on program activities, accomplishments, and lessons learned. Topics include establishing formal linkages between clinics and schools or youth-serving organizations, connecting youth to high-quality clinical sexual health services.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop E-70, Atlanta, GA 30341, E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/stltpublichealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Clinics, Health services delivery, Local MCH programs, Model programs, Prevention programs, Reproductive health, School linked programs, Sexual health, Urban population

Antonishak J, Finley C, Suellentrop K. 2014. Implementing an evidence-based pregnancy prevention program for youth in out-of-home care: Lessons learned from five implementing agencies. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report offers guidance and promising practices for implementing the adapted Making Proud Choices (MPCs) curriculum for youth in out-of-home care. Contents include lessons learned from implementation of the program in the following five geographically- and organizationally-diverse teams: Alameda County (California), Hawaii, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Rhode Island. Topics include creating partnerships, identifying gaps and special needs, measuring fidelity, and sustainability.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, California, Hawaii, Measures, Minnesota, Model programs, North Carolina, Prevention programs, Public private partnerships, Residential care, Rhode Island, Sustainability

Kan ML, Arndorfer E, Ashley OS, Palen L, Krieger K, Gallopin C, Menard A, Keene C, Vance MM, Gragg F, LeTourneau KL, Gremminger MG. 2014. Toolkit to incorporate adolescent relationship abuse prevention into existing adolescent pregnancy prevention programming. Washington, DC: Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Family and Youth Services Bureau, 1 v.

JSI Research and Training Institute. 2014. Engaging community stakeholders to address the social determinants of teen pregnancy. Boston, MA: John Snow, Inc., 5 pp.

Annotation: This case study highlights how state- and community-based organizations in Alabama, New York, and Texas used the root cause analysis (RCA) process to identify the social conditions (risk and protective factors) influencing adolescent pregnancy in their communities and create action plans to address these factors. Topics include using RCA to engage youth and diverse stakeholders, using RCA to develop a strategic plan, lessons learned from the RCA process, and recommendations.

Contact: John Snow, Inc., 44 Farnsworth Street, Boston, MA 02210-1211, Telephone: (617) 482-9485 Fax: (617) 482-0617 E-mail: jsinfo@jsi.com Web Site: http://www.jsi.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Alabama, Case studies, Community action, Community based agencies, New York, Prevention programs, Protective factors, Risk factors, State agencies, Strategic plans, Texas

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013. Reducing teen pregnancy in the United States. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 video (60 min.). (Public health grand rounds)

Annotation: This webcast focuses on reducing adolescent pregnancy in the United States. The speakers discuss ramifications of adolescent pregnancy and ways of preventing it and the roles of public health programs, parents, and health professionals in the effort. Progress in reducing adolescent pregnancy rates worldwide as well as the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention's efforts are discussed. The speakers also provide statistics related to adolescent pregnancy in the United States.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Communication, Contraception, Costs, Education, High risk adolescents, Low income groups, Parent child relations, Prevention, Programs, Public health, Statistical data

Leonard S, Fantroy JD, Lafferty K. 2013. Help me to succeed: A guide for supporting youth in foster care to prevent teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy; Atlanta, GA: Georgia Campaign for Adolescent Power and Potential, 15 pp.

Annotation: This guide combines messages directly from youth in foster care in Georgia with national research to provide insight and advice to adults working in the child welfare sector. It outlines how understanding a young person's feelings and opinions regarding the risks of early pregnancy and prevention strategies can help child welfare professionals provide more effective support.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Foster care, Georgia, Prevention programs, State programs, Unplanned pregnancy, Welfare services

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.