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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (75 total).

Great Expectations. n.d.. Great Expectations adolescent services. New Orleans, LA: Great Expectations, 7 pp.

Annotation: This pamphlet describes the adolescent center services of Great Expectations. It includes the center policy, purpose, goals and a description of the services offered for pregnant adolescents, adolescents at risk, and parenting adolescents. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Great Expectations Foundation, Inc., 4298 Elysian Fields Avenue, Suite B, New Orleans, LA 70122, Telephone: (504) 288-7818 Contact Phone: (504) 897-1049 Fax: (504) 288-7328 E-mail: arichard@greatexp.org Web Site: Available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent health services, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Healthy Start, Louisiana, adolescent center services

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2017. HRSA oral health: Across the agency. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document offers information about federal programs that provide funding to health centers, states, academic institutions, and other entities to recruit, train, and retain health professionals, including dentists and dental hygienists, in efforts to increase access to oral health care. The document also highlights program efforts to establish benchmarks for the nation’s oral health status and for oral health care and to ensure that oral health care is available to people living with HIV/AIDS; mothers, children, and adolescents, including those with special health care needs; and those who receive care at health centers.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Benchmarking, Children, Community health centers, Federal programs, HIV infected patients, Health care delivery, Health occupations, Health status, Low income groups, MCH services, Mothers, Oral health, Primary care, Quality assurance, Recruitment, Service integration, Special health care needs, State MCH programs, Training, Work force, Young adults

Bandy T, Andrews KM, Moore KA. 2012. Disadvantaged families and child outcomes: The importance of emotional support for mothers. Child Trends, 9 pp. (Research-to-results brief)

Annotation: This research brief focuses on the link between the level of support that mothers facing social and economic disadvantages receive in raising their children and their children's development. The brief provides background on the challenges faced by children from socially and emotionally disadvantaged families, describes the analysis the authors conducted, and presents findings.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescents, Child attitudes, Child behavior, Child development, Children, Communities, Early childhood development, Families, Family support, High risk groups, Income factors, Low income groups, Mental health, Mothers, Research, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical data

National Center on Family Homelessness. 2012. Developing a trauma-informed approach to serving young homeless families. Needham, MA: National Center on Family Homelessness, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brief outlines the core principles of trauma-informed care and outlines steps that organizations can take to adopt a trauma-informed approach to improve services to families that are experiencing homelessness. The brief discusses the core principles of trauma-informed care and provides five detailed steps to becoming trauma informed.

Contact: National Center on Family Homelessness, American Institutes for Research, 201 Jones Road, Suite 1, Waltham, MA 02451, Telephone: (781) 373-7073 E-mail: info@familyhomelessness.org Web Site: http://www.familyhomelessness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Emotional trauma, Families, High risk groups, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Low income groups, Mothers, Parents, Programs, Single parents, Social services, Stress, Trauma, Young children, Young children

National Partnership for Women and Families. 2012. California pregnant and parenting youth guide. Washington, DC: National Partnership for Women and Families, 143 pp.

Annotation: This guide is for pregnant and parenting youth under the age of 18 years old who live in the state of California. It explains where to go to get help and provides answers to questions such as (1) What should I do about my pregnancy? (2) Can I get health care? (3) Can I stay in school? (4) What are the father's rights and duties? and (5) Can I get public benefits? It includes information on the law for pregnant and parenting minors, immigrants who are pregnant, pregnant minors in foster care or juvenile detention centers, and a section for grandparents of pregnant or parenting youth.

Contact: National Partnership for Women and Families, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2600 Fax: (202) 986-2539 E-mail: info@nationalpartnership.org Web Site: http://www.nationalpartnership.org/site/PageServer Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, California, Consumer education materials, State initiatives, State legislation, Youth

Dworsky A, Wojnaroski M. 2012. An evaluation of the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services new birth assessment. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the evaluation of a policy implemented by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) in March 2011 that calls for the completion of a "new birth assessment" every time a DCFS adolescent becomes a parent, whether by giving birth or by fathering a child. In addition to providing background and context, the report discusses the new birth assessment, study purpose and methods, specialty worker and supervisor interviews, young parent interviews, analysis of data from agency records, and implications for research and practice.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent fathers, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Evaluation, Illinois, Interviews, Research, State programs

Mathematica Policy Research. 2011. The Public Health Nursing Early Intervention Program for Adolescent Mothers. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness, 3 pp. (HomVEE Short Report on the Early Intervention Program)

Annotation: This report provides summary information about the Public Health Nursing Early Intervention Program for Adolescent Mothers, including a review of studies of the program conducted between 1979 and 2009 and the evidence of the effectiveness of this home visiting service delivery model. Contact information for the developer of the model is also provided.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Early intervention programs, Home visiting, Models, Research reviews

Manlove J, Welti K, McCoy-Roth M, Berger A, Malm K. 2011. Teen parents in foster care: Risk factors and outcomes for teens and their children. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 9 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This report reviews the existing research literature on adolescents in foster care to assess the extent to which adolescents in foster care are at risk of adolescent pregnancy and parenting. The report highlights the various risk factors and identifies the challenges faced in efforts to reduce rates of adolescent pregnancy and childbearing and to prevent negative outcomes among adolescent parents in foster care and their children.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Data analysis, Foster children, Research reviews, Risk factors

Perper K, Manlove J. 2009. Estimated percentage of females who will become teen mothers: Differences across states. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 4 pp.

Annotation: This research brief provides new state-level information on adolescent childbearing. The brief presents percentages of females estimated to become adolescent mothers, by state, and discusses trends, variations across states, and the relationship between state rankings on the likelihood of becomes an adolescent mother and state rankings on adolescent birth rates.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: State surveys, Adolescent mothers, Statistical data, Trends

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2009. Science says: Socio-economic and family characteristics of teen childbearing . Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 3 pp. (Putting what works to work; no. 41)

Annotation: This fact sheet presents new findings on the socioeconomic and family characteristics of adolescents who give birth to or father a child and examines commonly held beliefs about this population among American adults. The findings are based on 2009 public opinion polling data and an analysis conducted by Child Trends using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), a nationally representative longitudinal survey of students. Included are statistics on the family structure and the family income of adolescents who had reported ever giving birth.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Data analysis, Longitudinal studies, Sampling studies, Socioeconomic factors

Maynard RA, ed. 2008. Kids having kids: Economic costs and social consequences of teen pregnancy [2nd ed]. Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press, 448 pp.

Annotation: This book consists of a background study of the historical and international trends in adolescent pregnancy and the effects of early pregnancy on the mother's and, eventually, the child's education, work history, and life-long earnings. Seven coordinated studies then focus on specific elements in the data and use statistical projections that take into account other social factors, such as education, race, marital status, cultural background, and neighborhood crime incidence, to estimate the consequences of early pregnancy for the mothers, for the fathers, for the children (health, abuse, incarceration, life chances), and for society. Numerous tables and graphs illustrate the data.

Contact: University Press of America, 4501 Forbes Boulevard, Suite 200, Lanham, MD 20706, Telephone: (410) 459-3366 Secondary Telephone: (800) 462-6420 Web Site: http://www.univpress.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-87766-654-7.

Keywords: Adolescent employment, Adolescent fathers, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Child abuse, Child support, Child welfare, Demography, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Employment, Family income, Health care utilization, Incarcerated youth, Low income groups, Maternal age, Pregnant adolescents, Psychosocial predictors, Social support, Statistics, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy

Cardone I, Gilkerson L, Wechsler N. 2008. Teenagers and their babies: A perinatal home visitor's guide. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 163 pp.

Annotation: This book provides home visitors with examples on how to help expectant and new adolescent parents build deep and enduring bonds of attachment with their baby. Methods and strategies based on Community-Based Family Administered Neonatal Activities are discussed in a step-by-step review of how to implement a research-validated, structured intervention plan. Examples from six prenatal and one postnatal home visits describe techniques and activities designed to help build the strong mother-child relationships that prevent child abuse and strengthen the self-confidence and competence of young families. The appendices include resources on pregnancy and newborn infants , as well as information on fetal movement and newborn behavior, hearing, behavioral states, touch, smell and taste, vision, and a postnatal home visiting guide.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org $29.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-934019-16-0.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Early intervention services, Fetal development, Home visiting, Mother child relations, Newborn infants, Pregnancy, Pregnant adolescents, Training materials

Schoenberg J, Salmond K, Fleshman P. 2006. The new normal?: What girls say about healthy living . New York, NY: Girl Scouts of the USA, 116 pp., exec. summ. (36 pp.).

Annotation: This report describes a study that examined both attitudinal and behavioral issues that inform girls' health and emotial well-being (e.g., body image, diet, exercise, sources of health-related information). The report, which includes an executive summary, discusses the following research findings: (1) incidence of overweight in the sample, (2) aspiring to be normal healthy, (3) girls and body image, (4) tension between awareness and behavior, (5) girls and physical activity, (6) the influential role of mothers, and (7) communicating with girls. The report also includes conclusions and recommendations, references and resources, an online survey for girls and adolescents and one for parents, a focus group discussion guide, and endnotes. The executive summary is also available in Spanish.

Contact: Girl Scouts of the USA, 420 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10018-2798, Telephone: (800) 478-7248 Secondary Telephone: (212) 852-8000 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.girlscouts.org executive summary available from the website; full report available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent children, Adolescent health, Body image, Child attitudes, Child behavior, Child health, Communication, Female adolescents, Mothers, Obesity, Physical activity, Spanish language materials

Terry-Humen E, Manlove J, Moore KA. 2005. Playing catch-up: How children born to teen mothers fare. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 30 pp.

Annotation: This paper, part of the Putting What Works to Work project, explores the complex relationship between the age at which a woman has a child and how her child fares. Two primary areas are discussed: (1) what is the magnitude of differences on measures of development between children born to adolescent mothers aged 17 and younger and children born to older women; and (2) what differences between the kindergarten children remain after taking into account characteristics of the child, the mother, and the household. Topics addressed include differences in child, family, and mother's background characteristics by age of mother; differences among children by age of mother at first birth; cognition and knowledge and language and communications differences in children born to adolescent mothers. The report is divided into the following sections: summary, introduction, key findings, research to date, data, sample, measures, methods, results, discussion, conclusion, and literature cited. Statistical information is provided in charts and tables throughout the paper.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-58671-053-2.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Ethnic factors, Family characteristics, Infant health, Language development, Maternal age, Racial factors, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. 2005. Mother's serious mental illness and substance use among youths. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 5 pp. (NSDUH report)

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses results from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health on the association between substance use among youth and mothers' serious mental illness (SMI). the fact sheet, which includes results in brief, also discusses SMI and substance abuse among mothers, and substance abuse among youths living with a mother who had SMI or substance use. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the fact sheet. Endnotes are included.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies, 1 Choke Cherry Road, Room 7-1044, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (240) 276-1212 Web Site: http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, MCH research, Mental disorders, Mothers, Substance abuse, Substance abusing mothers, Surveys, Youth

Flanigan C, Huffman R, Smith J. 2005. Science says: Teens' attitudes toward nonmarital childbearing, 2002. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 3 pp. (Putting what works to work; no. 15)

Annotation: This issue brief uses the most recent round of National Survey of Family Growth data, collected in 2002, to examine adolescents' attitudes toward childbearing outside marriage. In particular, the brief discusses the attitudes of older adolescents, sexually experienced adolescents, and adolescent mothers. Endnotes are included. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the brief.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Research, Single parents

Lindsay JW. 2004. Teens parenting: The challenge of toddlers—Parenting your child from one to three. (3rd ed.). Buena Park, CA: Morning Glory Press, 222 pp. (Teens parenting)

Annotation: This book and workbook are a guide to help adolescent parents care for their one to three year old children. It is written at a sixth grade reading level. Topics covered include nutrition, sleep, language development, health and safety, and activities of toddlers. The needs and responsibilities of adolescent parents are addressed with guidance on planning for the future and dealing with extended family living situations. The workbook is designed to help adolescents understand the material presented in the book through answering questions, writing out their thoughts and feelings, playing games with their children, and carrying out projects such as preparing a chart on birth control options.

Contact: Morning Glory Press, 6595 San Haroldo Way, Buena Park, CA 90620-3748, Telephone: (888) 612-8254 Fax: (888) 327-4362 E-mail: info@morningglorypress.com Web Site: http://www.morningglorypress.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent fathers, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent parents, Child health, Early childhood development, Parenting, Young children

Klerman LV. 2004. Another chance: Preventing additional births to teen mothers. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy and National Organization on Adolescent Pregnancy, Parenting, and Prevention, 49 pp.

Annotation: This report presents information about what is known about additional births to adolescent mothers. The primary focus of the report is its critical review and assessment of various prevention programs. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) the scope of the problem, (2) risk factors and consequences, (3) program evaluations, and (4) looking forward: recommendations and final thoughts. Each section includes references. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. The appendix presents the challenges of assessing evaluations of programs to prevent additional births to adolescent mothers.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Community programs, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Risk factors

Child Trends and National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 2004. Science says: The relationship between teenage motherhood and marriage. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 9 pp. (Putting what works to work; no. 11)

Annotation: This report explores the relationship between adolescent motherhood and marriage and how being born to an adolescent mother affects a child's life. Issues discussed in the report include overall trends in adolescent births and marriage, the marital status of adolescent mothers, adolescent mothers' marital hopes and realities, and the consequences of remaining an unmarried mother. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. The report concludes with endnotes.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Children, Marriage, Poverty, Single mothers, Trends

O'Hare WP. 2003. Perceptions and misperceptions of America's children: The role of the print media. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 18 pp. (KIDS COUNT working paper)

Annotation: This paper, which is linked to a recent report that identified several misconceptions that Americans have about children, examines one possible source of those misconceptions: print media. The study reported in the paper analyzed a set of articles that appeared in five major newspapers from September 2002 to September 2003. The author analyzed articles on the following topics: immigration, welfare, single parent families, adolescent birth rates, and out-of-wedlock births. Data are presented in a table at the end of the paper. The paper concludes with a reference list.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, Kids Count, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 Web Site: http://www.aecf.org/MajorInitiatives/KIDSCOUNT.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Children, Immigration, Mass media, Misinformation, Single mothers, Single parents, Welfare

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.