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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (30 total).

Partnership for Male Youth. n.d.. The Partnership for Male Youth: Health provider toolkit for adolescent and young adult males. Washington, DC: Partnership for Male Youth, multiple items.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to help health professionals address the unique health care needs of adolescents and young adult males (AYAs) ages 10 to 26. Contents include a checklist covering nine health domains; client interview questions and supporting materials for each domain including background information, practice tools, and references; and a video library containing presentations for continuing medical education and client education. Topics include healthy eating and physical activity, sexual and reproductive health, trauma, mental health, developmental disorders, sexual biologic basics, normal pubertal concerns and genital abnormalities, and labs and immunizations. A tutorial is also available.

Contact: Partnership for Male Youth, 900 Second Street, N.E., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20002, E-mail: barbour@partnershipformaleyouth.org Web Site: http://www.partnershipformaleyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Adolescent health, Adolescent males, Comprehensive health care, Continuing medical education, Evidence based health care, Health examinations, Immunizations, Interviews, Medical history taking, Men's health, Screening, Young adults

Way N. 2016. The crisis of connection for adolescent boys. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1 video. (34 min.). (TAG Talks video series)

Annotation: This video provides information about increasing isolation among adolescent males as they move from childhood to adolescence and how social connections affect health and well-being. The video encourages adults to rethink assumptions and provides strategies to encourage the friendships that help adolescent boys thrive. Supplemental materials, including a discussion guide for professionals and family members, are also available.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2846 E-mail: oah.gov@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent males, Psychosocial development, Social support

My Brother's Keeper Task Force. 2014. My Brother's Keeper Task Force report to the president. Washington, DC: Executive Office of the President, 61 pp.

Annotation: This report describes progress on a national initiative to address persistent opportunity gaps faced by boys and young men of color. The report outlines the building blocks for success across key life stages and presents initial recommendations and areas of opportunity for each of the key milestones. The focus areas include entering school ready to learn, reading at grade level by third grade, graduating from high school ready for college and career, completing postsecondary education or training, entering the work force, reducing violence, and providing a second chance. Cross-cutting areas of opportunity that span all focus areas are also discussed.

Contact: White House, Executive Office of the President, Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent males, Barriers, Cultural factors, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Graduation, Juvenile justice, Learning, Life course, Men, Minority groups, Reading, School to work transition, Social factors, Violence prevention, Work family issues, Work force, Young adults

Siegel J. 2013. Effective clinical interviewing of adolescent boys and young men. Boston, MA: Boston Children's Hospital,

Annotation: This training toolkit is aimed at improving the communication skills of medical, nursing, and mental health trainees and professionals and facilitating their ability to interview adolescent boys effectively during clinical visits. Included in the toolkit are online vignettes (in video format with accompanying scripts) to help clinicians communicate effectively and gather important health information from adolescent boys and young men. The vignettes include an introduction to a preventive services visit; effective approaches when asking about depression or sexual activity; an introduction to a mental health assessment; and an assessment for depression during a mental health visit. The toolkit also contains handouts such as a mental health assessment tool, a substance abuse screening interview, and a checklist of important elements of communication for clinical interviews with adolescent boys.

Contact: Boston Children's Hospital , 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, Telephone: (617) 355-6000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-7944 Web Site: http://www.childrenshospital.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health professionals, Adolescent males, Communication, Interviews, Mental health, Primary care, Resources for professionals

Brandt R, Phillips R. 2013. Improving supports for youth of color traumatized by violence. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the most effective ways to support male children and adolescents traumatized by exposure to violence. The report introduces the problem and then discusses theoretical models and approaches, including school-based employment-based, and care-coordination strategies, improved implementation of service systems; and action steps.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescent males, Behavior modification, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Child development, Communities, Families, Health care systems, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Low income groups, Male children, Poverty, Prevention, Programs, Racial factors, Schools, Service delivery, Trauma, Violence, Violence prevention

National Institute of Mental Health. 2011. Eating disorders. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Mental Health, 10 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information about eating disorders. The document explains what eating disorders are; discusses the different types of eating disorders including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder; explains how eating disorders are treated, and discusses how males are affected and what is being done to better understand and treat eating disorders.

Contact: National Institute of Mental Health, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20892-9663, Telephone: (866) 615-6464 Secondary Telephone: (301) 443-8431 Fax: (301) 443-4279 E-mail: nimhinfo@nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nimh.nih.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 11-4901.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent females, Adolescent males, Anorexia nervosa, Bulimia, Child behavior, Eating disorders, Female children, Male children, Treatment

Minino AM. 2010. Mortality among teenagers aged 12-19 years: United States, 1999-2006. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 7 pp. (NCHS data brief, no. 37)

Annotation: This data brief presents information about deaths to adolescents (ages 12-19) in the United States from 1999 to 2006. The brief discusses the risk of dying for this population, leading causes of death, and the cause of death accounting for high death rates among non-Hispanic black male adolescents.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent death, Adolescent males, Adolescent mortality, Blacks, High risk adolescents, Hispanics, Prevention, Racial factors, Sex factors

California Endowment. 2010. Healthy communities matter: The importance of place to the health of boys of color. Los Angeles, CA: California Endowment, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights how the neighborhoods where Latino and African-American boys and young men grow up directly influence their health outcomes. It examines racial and ethnic disparities -- and the magnitude of these disparities -- between boys and young men of color and white boys and young men across four broad areas: health, safety, socioeconomic, and ready-to-learn. The report analysis and findings point to the need for comprehensive policy solutions implemented at the community level in order to reduce such disparities. Examples of promising programs in communities across the country are provided.

Contact: California Endowment, Greater Los Angeles Program Office, 1000 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012, Telephone: (800) 449-4149 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.calendow.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent males, Blacks, Community programs, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Factor analysis, Hispanic Americans, Life course, Male children, Minority health, Model programs, Neighborhoods, Policy development, Racial factors, Socioeconomic factors, Underserved communities, Young men

Davis LM, Kilburn MR, Schultz DJ. 2009. Reparable harm: Assessing and addressing disparities faced by boys and men of color in California. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 122 pp.

Annotation: This book summarizes a conceptual framework which describes macro, community, interpersonal, and individual level contextual factors that interact to promote or inhibit positive health outcomes. It then examines disparities in socioeconomic, physical and mental health, safety, and readiness to learn indicators that exist between boys and men of color and white boys and men in California. It calculates the odds for outcomes across a variety of indicators in these four domains to illustrate the challenges that boys and men of color are more likely to face in succeeding in life. It reviews strategies, practices, and policies for reducing these disparities and concludes with an appendix of data on additional indicators.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org $55 plus shipping and handling, or available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-8330-4561-4.

Keywords: Adolescent males, Blacks, California, Environmental influences, Health, Health status disparities, Hispanic Americans, Learning, Male children, Men, Minority groups, Safety, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Whites, Young men

Rich J, Corbin T, Bloom S, Rich L, Evans S, and Wilson A. 2009. Healing the hurt: Trauma-informed approaches to the health of boys and young men of color. Los Angeles, CA: California Endowment, 83 pp.

Annotation: This report looks at the effects of trauma on the health of boys and young men of color (Hispanic and African American) over the course of their lifespan and explores ways in which poor health outcomes might be prevented or mitigated. Included are definitions of trauma and trauma theory; a review of the science related to trauma and brain development; a discussion of trauma as a social determinant; and possible applications of trauma knowledge to community prevention and system change efforts. Included is a detailed description of the Sanctuary Model -- an evidence-supported method for creating a culture in which healing from psychologically and socially traumatic experiences can be addressed. A list of selected references is included, along with an appendix of trauma experts in the state of California.

Contact: California Endowment, Greater Los Angeles Program Office, 1000 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012, Telephone: (800) 449-4149 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.calendow.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent males, Blacks, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Hispanic Americans, Human development, Life course, Male children, Mental health, Minority health, Prevention programs, Racial factors, Socioeconomic factors, Trauma, Young men

Sabatiuk L, Flores R. 2009. Toward a common future: Latino teens and adults speak out about teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 32 pp.

Annotation: This pamphlet, which is geared toward Latino adolescents; presents perspectives on adolescent pregnancy and sexual activity in the voices of Latino adolescent males and females. Statistics about adolescent pregnancy and parenting are also provided.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent females, Adolescent males, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Consumer education materials, Contraception, Hispanic Americans, Prevention

Marsiglio W, Ries AV, Sonenstein FL, Troccoli K, Whitehead M. 2006. It's a guy thing: Boys, young men, and teen pregnancy prevention. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 162 pp. (Putting what works to work)

Annotation: This report includes three papers that address, from different perspectives, how boys and young men factor into adolescent pregnancy trends. The first paper reviews research on the attitudes and behaviors of adolescent boys and young men regarding sex, contraception, pregnancy, and related issues. The second paper reviews evaluation research on the effectiveness of school-based, co-educational programs in reducing risky sexual behavior among adolescent boys. The third paper offers a qualitative look at the challenges in engaging adolescent boys and young men in adolescent pregnancy prevention and some strategies for addressing these challenges. The report also includes a summary of all three papers.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-58671-060-5.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents males, Contraception, High risk adolescents, Prevention, Schools, Trends

National Adolescent Health Information Center. 2006. 2006 fact sheet on mortality: Adolescents and young adults. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent Health Information Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet presents information about mortality among adolescents and young adults (ages 10-24). The fact sheet includes highlights, a pie chart showing leading causes of death in this population, and information about the mortality rates of young adults vs. younger adolescents, motor vehicle crashes, mortality rates for young adult males and for American Indian and Alaska Native and black males, racial and ethnic disparities, and trends in mortality rates. Statistical informaiton is presented in figures throughout the fact sheet. Data and figure sources and notes are included.

Contact: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco, LHTS Suite 245, Box 0503, San Francisco, CA 94143-0503, Telephone: (415) 502-4856 Fax: (415) 502-4858 E-mail: nahic@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://nahic.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent males, Adolescent mortality, Age factors, Alaska Natives, American Indians, Blacks, Ethnic factors, Mortality rates, Motor vehicle crashes, Racial factors, Trends, Young adults

National Adolescent Health Information Center. 2006. 2006 fact sheet on suicide: Adolescents and young adults. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent Health Information Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet presents information about suicide among adolescents and young adults (ages 10-24). The fact sheet includes highlights; a pie chart showing suicide's ranking among the leading causes of death in this population; and information about the suicide rates among young adults vs. younger adolescents; suicide rates among young males, young females, and American Indian and Alaska Native males; rates of attempted suicide among female adolescents and female Hispanic adolescents; and trends in suicide rates. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the fact sheet. Data and figure sources and notes are included.

Contact: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco, LHTS Suite 245, Box 0503, San Francisco, CA 94143-0503, Telephone: (415) 502-4856 Fax: (415) 502-4858 E-mail: nahic@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://nahic.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent males, Adolescents, Alaska natives, American Indians, Attempted suicide, Hispanic Americans, Suicide, Trends, Young adults

Family Life Council. [2005]. Wise Guys: Male responsibility curriculum. Greensboro, NC: Family Life Council,

Annotation: This curriculum is designed to prevent adolescent pregnancy and sexually-transmitted diseases by communicating with adolescent males about issues concerning self, values, future goals, and sexuality; it focuses on both abstinence and contraception. The curriculum is a guide for instructors with all of the educational materials, handouts, and activities needed. Additional information on the Web site includes a customizable television spot about the program, a list of training sites, a description of variations in the Wise Guy program that are available, and materials for adolescents, parents, and professionals. Some of the material is in Spanish.

Contact: Wise Guys, Family Life Council, 301 East Washington Street, Suite 204, Greensboro, NC 27401, Telephone: (336) 333-6890 Fax: (336) 333-6891 E-mail: wiseguys@flcgso.com Web Site: http://www.wiseguysnc.org/

Keywords: Adolescent males, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Prevention programs, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases, Spanish language materials, Training materials

Vandivere S, Zaslow M, Brooks J, Redd Z . 2004. Do child characteristics affect how children fare in families receiving and leaving welfare? . Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 42 pp. (Assessing the new federalism; discussion papers)

Annotation: This paper reports on the use of data from the National Survey of America's Families (NSAF) in analyses revealing a pattern in which male adolescents in the families of former welfare recipients (leavers) may be faring worse than their counterparts in the families of current recipients. The paper looks at how developmental risk compares for children in current recipient and leaver families by gender, age, race, and ethnicity; why adolescent boys in leaver families might fare worse than those in current recipient families; and further evidence on why adolescent boys in former recipient families seem at elevated risk. The paper includes a conclusion and discussion, references, and appendix tables.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Age factors, Child development, Children, Ethnic factors, Families, High risk adolescents, Low income groups, Males, Racial factors, Sex characteristics, Welfare programs

Flanigan C. 2003. Science says: The sexual attitudes and behavior of male teens. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 6 pp. (Putting what works to work; no. 6)

Annotation: This brief provide information on adolescent boys' sexual activity and contraceptive use, their attitudes toward both, and advice for parents and program leaders. Topics include sexual experience, frequency of sexual activity, number of partners, attitudes toward abstinence and sexual activity, condom use, contraception, pregnancy, and fatherhood. Implications for parents and professionals are also covered. Statistics are presented in figures throughout the brief. Endnotes are provided.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent fatherhood, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Condoms, Contraception, Males, Statistics

Alan Guttmacher Institute. 2002. In their own right: Addressing the sexual and reproductive health needs of American men. New York, NY: Alan Guttmacher Institute, 88 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an overview of some fundamental patterns in men's sexual and reproductive lives, from ages 15 to 49, and their implications for policy and programs. It is divided into topics by age groups, 15-19, 20-29, 30-49, and includes topics likely to be associated with these age groups such as initiating sexual relationships, settling down, and forming families. Additional chapter topics include sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and condom use; sexual reproductive health information and services for men; and a summary chapter. Statistics are provided in each chapter through the use of charts, tables, and graphs. The report includes extensive references and notes; an appendix listing socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of U.S. men and rates of STDs by various years and by state; and additional tables of statistics.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-939253-57-7.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Age groups, Condoms, Family characteristics, Males, Reproductive health, Sexual behavior, Sexual development, Sexually transmitted diseases, Statistics, Surveys

Leigh WA, Andrews JL. 2002. Contraceptive use. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 6 pp. (Fact sheets on the reproductive health of African American adolescents)

Annotation: This fact sheet outlines information about contraceptive use by African-American males, including types of contraceptives used, comparison with other racial groups, and effectiveness of education and intervention on contraceptive use. Four tables present statistical data for female contraceptive use as well as male condom use. This fact sheet is a summary from the full report: The Reproductive Health of African American Adolescents: What We Know and What We Don't Know.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Contraception, Contraceptive devices, Contraceptive use, Males, Sexual behavior, Statistical data, Surveys

Sonenstein FL, Stewart K, Lindberg LD, Pernas M, Williams S. 1997. Involving males in preventing teen pregnancy: A guide for program planners. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 176 pp.

Annotation: This report presents information on the role of adolescent males in preventing pregnancy. The report provides the following: demographic information on adolescent males, a list of prevention programs which involve males, and advice to those who want to start such a program. Each prevention program listed includes a list of lessons learned. Appendices include the methodology of identifying the programs, contact information for exemplary programs, a list of male involvement programs by state, sample materials, and a list of references.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Contact Phone: (202) 857-8687 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Contact E-mail: pubs@ui.urban.org Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Community programs, Males, Prevention

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.