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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (2,048 total).

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d. . Tips to promote social-emotional health among teens. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides advice to help promote social and emotional health among adolescents. It includes separate tips for teenagers, parents, schools, and pediatricians. Links to additional resources produced by the American Academy of Pediatrics are also provided.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Social interaction

Churchill Media and Center for Science in the Public Interest. n.d.. Fast food: What's in it for you?. Los Angeles, CA: Churchill Media; Washington, DC: Center for Science in the Public Interest, 1 videotape (16:30 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape is designed to educate students in grades 5 to 7 about the nutritional values of foods and the relationship between the foods they eat and their health. It follows two characters in the videotape as they learn about foods that are high in saturated fats, cholesterol, and sugar. It indicates ways they can make better food choices at fast food restaurants and at home. The videotape discussion guide provides a summary of the videotape, learning objectives, suggestions for discussions and activities, and a list of several related materials.

Contact: Society for Visual Education, 6465 North Avondale Avenue, Chicago, IL 60631, Telephone: (800) 253-2788 Secondary Telephone: 1-773-775-9433 Fax: 1-800-444-9855 E-mail: clearvue_service@discovery.com Web Site: http://www.clearvue.com/index.asp Price unknown. Document Number: ISBN 0-7932-0796-7.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent nutrition, Audiovisual materials, Educational materials, Materials for adolescents, Videotapes

Guam Department of Public Health and Social Services. n.d.. Family planning. Agana, GU: Guam Department of Public Health and Social Services, 1 videotape.

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d.. Alcohol: Your child and drugs. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 1 p. (Teen health brochures)

Annotation: This brochure explains the developmental damage that can occur to adolescents from alcohol and emphasizes parent-child communication as one of the best ways of preventing this problem.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $15.00 for 100 copies, members; $20.00, nonmembers. Minimum order: 100 copies.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Alcohol abuse, Communication

Milner-Fenwick. n.d.. Teen contraception. Timonium, MD: Milner-Fenwick, 1 videotape (13:30 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch). (Video counseling library)

Annotation: This videotape dispels common myths about contraception and describes a range of contraceptive options available today, including Norplant, Depro-Provera, and abstinence. It discusses the importance of using condoms in conjunction with other contraceptives to prevent sexually transmitted diseases. The information is presented by adolescents in a non-judgmental fashion; it does contain some explicit scenes. The videotape is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Milner-Fenwick, 2125 Greenspring Drive, Timonium, MD 21093-3113, Telephone: (800) 432-8433 Secondary Telephone: (410) 252-1700 Fax: (410) 252-6316 E-mail: patiented@milner-fenwick.com Web Site: http://www.milner-fenwick.com/index.asp $250.00. Document Number: OB-130.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Audiovisual materials, Condoms, Contraception, Educational materials, Sexually transmitted diseases, Spanish language materials, Videotapes

Bronheim S, Fiel S, Schidlow D, MagrabP, Boczar K, Dillon C. n.d.. Crossings: A manual for transition of chronically ill youth to adult health care. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Department of Health, 52 pp.

Annotation: This manual is intended as a guide for health professionals to establish a new health care delivery system for transitioning adolescents with chronic illness to adult health care. Health professionals learn about eight objectives: exploring one's commitment to transition, identification of initial partners; securing institutional support; assuring economic feasibility, developing a structure, developing a successful partnership, and achieving a successful transfer of patients. A self-assessment form is included.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Price unknown.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Health services, Special health care needs, Transition planning, Transitions, Young adults

McManus M, Kelly R, Newacheck P, Gephart J. n.d.. The role of Title V maternal and child health programs in assuring access to health services for adolescents. Washington, DC: McManus Health Policy, 36 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a 1989 survey of state Title V maternal and child health (MCH) programs and children with special health needs (CSHN) programs with respect to their roles in serving adolescents. The publication brings together the results of adolescent health initiatives from both MCH and CSHN perspectives in order to examine how these programs might be better coordinated and strengthened. The survey revealed that most Title V-supported programs routinely bill Medicaid (and, to a lesser extent, private insurance) for some services. Limited revenues are received from insurance due to inadequate billing capacity, the type of services offered by Title V programs, and low reimbursement from Medicaid. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Child health, Insurance, Maternal health, Medicaid, Social Security Act, Special health care needs, Title V

District of Columbia Healthy Start Project. n.d.. The D.C. Healthy Start Project's peer education/teen theater program: How to start your own peer educator/teen theater program manual. Washington, DC: District of Columbia Healthy Start Project, 34 pp.

Annotation: This manual is designed to help peer educators start their own teen theater program. Through a series of 20–30 minute skits, peer educators are trained to help adolescents better understand a variety of health issues. The manual explains the philosophy of the teen theater program and how to establish such a program. The manual includes skits, activities, and exercises. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: District of Columbia Healthy Start Project, Office of Maternal and Child Health, St. Elizabeth's Campus, Cottage Seven, 2700 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, S.E., Washington, DC 20032, Telephone: (202) 645-4174 Contact Phone: (202) 645-5624 Fax: (202) 645-5084 Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent health programs, Adolescent health promotion, Adolescents, District of Columbia Healthy Start, Manuals, Outreach, Peer education, Risk prevention, Theater, Training materials

Great Expectations/Healthy Start. n.d.. Prenatal education curriculum. New Orleans, LA: Great Expectations/Healthy Start, ca. 150 pp.

Annotation: This study guide consists of a series of brief training sessions on various aspects of prenatal and infant care. Curricula topics include the following: 1) anatomy and physiology of pregnancy; 2) breastfeeding; 3) alcohol, smoking, and drug abuse; 4) personal hygiene; 5) sexually transmitted diseases; 6) contraception/family planning; and 7) domestic violence. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Great Expectations Foundation, Inc., 4298 Elysian Fields Avenue, Suite B, New Orleans, LA 70122, Telephone: (504) 288-7818 Fax: (504) 288-7328 E-mail: arichard@greatexp.org Web Site: Available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Breastfeeding, Contraception, Curricula, Domestic violence, Educational materials, Great Expectations/New Orleans Healthy Start, Infant care, Infant health, Nutrition, Pregnancy, Prenatal care, Prenatal education, Prenatal nutrition, Sexually transmitted diseases, Smoking, Substance dependence, Training materials

Mile Square Health Center. n.d.. Healthy 2000: Educating our youth. Springfield, IL: Mile Square Health Center, 18 pp.

Annotation: This information packet is designed for adolescent health advocate trainees who work in the "Healthy 2000 : Educating Our Youth" program. The packet describes the goals and objectives of the program, lists the skills trainees are expected to develop, outlines the curriculum, and contains a skills checklist and an evaluation form to test participants' knowledge of adolescent health issues.

Contact: Chicago Healthy Start, 535 West Jefferson Street, First Floor, Springfield, IL 62761, Telephone: (312) 793-4662 Contact Phone: (217) 782-4890 Fax: (217) 782-4890 Price unknown.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent programs, Community health centers, Community programs, Curricula, Healthy People 2000, Training materials

McIntire MS, Mitchell JR. n.d.. Comprehensive health care delivery for children and youth: A combined approach. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 7 pp. (Comment series no: 2-1 (41))

Annotation: This paper reports a Children and Youth Project conducted by combining the forces of a medical school and a health department, by maintaining role differentiation in respect to education and service, and by developing a Central Health Record and communication system to develop and increase comprehensive health services for children and youth residing in the target areas of poverty. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Comprehensive health services, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

Gedgoud JL, McIntire MS. n.d.. Progress report of a combined approach for children and youth services. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 11 pp. (Comment series no: 3-2 (45))

Annotation: This report demonstrates graphically how a combination of a health department and a medical school compress to the national average of all Children and Youth projects. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs Comprehensive health services, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

Larsen B. n.d.. The role of theoretical research and model building in the health care sciences. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 18 pp. (Comment series no: 3-6 (46))

Davidson GB. n.d.. Toward the control of lead poisoning in children: A cost/benefit analysis. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 46 pp. (Study series no.: 1-6 (9a))

Annotation: This paper evaluates the general worth of a specified lead poisoning control program confined to the Children and Youth Projects' child population only. The sensitivity of the cost/benefit model to the assumptions of the paper as well as to the input data considered is considered. The expected benefit of the proposed lead poisoning control program is compared to the expected cost. This paper is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Cost effectiveness, Federal MCH programs, Lead poisoning, Lead poisoning prevention programs, Title V programs

Larsen B. n.d.. Activity analysis III: The duality aspect of linear programming. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 24 pp. (Study series no.: 0-3 (28))

Annotation: This paper is part of a series on activity analysis to give the conceptual and methodological framework necessary for the application of activity analysis to health care problems in general, and to the management of Children and Youth Program projects in particular. In this first paper in the series the general linear programming problem is formulated, and a number of possible applications in the health care field are suggested. The specific purpose of this paper is to serve as a supplement to the other expositions of the problem, focusing on the duality aspect of linear programming. This paper is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title II. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Federal MCH programs, Statistical analysis

De Geyndt W. n.d.. Evaluation of health programs: An annotated bibliography. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 107 pp. (Comment series no.: 8-9 (9))

Annotation: This bibliography is a revision and updating of comment series no. 7-9 (4) with the addition new sources and annotations for all sources. This publication supersedes the previous non-annotated bibliography, "Bibliography on Evaluation of Health Programs." This is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: .Comprehensive health care, Adolescent health programs, Bibliographies, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Federal MCH programs, Health services, Program evaluation, Title V programs

Weckwerth VE. n.d.. The comprehensive hardware store: An analogy prepared in response to a request for the difference between comprehensive health care and other care. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 6 pp. (Comment series no.: 8-9 (10))

Ertel PY, Ambuel JP, Graham BD. n.d.. What is a C and Y Project?. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 6 pp. (Comment series no.: 8-10 (11))

Annotation: This paper is a comparative description of the Columbus, Ohio Children and Youth Program project. The differences between this and other projects in operational definitions, approaches to problems, and the kinds of innovations developed to enhance their delivery of services is discussed. This is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title II. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: .Comprehensive health care, Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Federal MCH programs

Appleby C, Neher WR, Sprague L, Appleby M. n.d.. The marathon encounter: Toward a philosophy of care. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 55 pp. (Comment series no.: 9-1 (12))

Annotation: This paper is a report of a marathon encounter group studying physician patient relations and its implications for a philosophy of care. Both health personnel and patients were participants. This paper will include the background and philosophy of the marathon, the theoretical assumptions, methodology, findings from the marathon, suggestions for future marathon projects, suggestions for future evaluations of marathons, and implications for interdisciplinary attempts at comprehensive care in in low-income areas. This is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: .Comprehensive health care, Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Federal MCH programs, Physician patient relations, Title V programs

Hallstrom BJ, Osterman KE. n.d.. Independent, dependent, and collaborative functioning and the nursing role. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 13 pp. (Comment series no.: 9-2 (13))

Annotation: This paper develops a conceptual model of the process by which health care is delivered by health care practitioners. Independent, dependent, and collaborative functioning are identified. Nursing literature regarding nursing roles and functioning is reviewed and related to the process of providing care. This is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title II. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: .Comprehensive health care, Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Federal MCH programs, Nursing

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.