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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (31 total).

Epstein R, Gonzalez T. 2017. Gender & trauma: Somatic interventions for girls in juvenile justice–Implications for policy and practice. Washington, DC: Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality, 37 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a foundational understanding of the relationship between trauma and gender -- with a focus on system-involved girls -- and provides an analysis of somatic interventions. In particular, the report maps the ways in which trauma-informed, gender-responsive, and culturally competent yoga and mindfulness programs can address the short- and long-term impact of trauma on girls in the juvenile justice system. Topics include the core components of somatic interventions for traumatized girls, data documenting positive effects, and specific policy and practice recommendations to increase access for system-involved girls.

Contact: Georgetown Law, Center on Poverty and Inequality, 600 New Jersey Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 661-6692 E-mail: povertycenter@law.georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.law.georgetown.edu/academics/centers-institutes/poverty-inequality/index.cfm Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent females, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Intervention, Juvenile justice, Policy development, Sexuality, Therapeutics, Trauma care

Roth MS, Allman A, Wilhite BC. 2014–. Health and wellness for adolescent girls and women with mental and behavioral health conditions: Knowledge path (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This knowledge path aims to bridge the public health and mental health information needs of professionals on approaches to promoting optimal health and wellness for women of childbearing age who experience a mental, emotional, or behavioral heath condition. The resource covers topics relevant to health promotion and disease prevention for all women, and specifically for women with mental and behavioral health disorders. Topics include reproductive and maternal health, intentional injury, chronic conditions, healthy behaviors, and health disparities. Contents include websites, distance learning tools, reports, data and statistics, journal articles and other literature and research, and guides on related topics. A separate brief presents resources for women and their families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Consumer education materials, Disease prevention, Emotional disorders, Health promotion, Mental health, Resources for professionals, Women

Women Deliver. 2014. Invest in girls and women: Everybody wins–The path ahead to sustainable development. New York, NY: Women Deliver, 19 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit presents specific tasks and goals related to maternal and newborn health, family planning and reproductive health, women's health, education, and equality, with the aim of providing global partners with a course of action to advocate for the health and well-being of girls and women. Contents include infographics, data points, and key messages to make the case for investing in girls and women.

Contact: Women Deliver, 584 Broadway, Suite 306, New York, NY 10012, Telephone: (646) 695-9100 Fax: (646) 695-9145 E-mail: info@womendeliver.org Web Site: http://www.womendeliver.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Advocacy, Child health, Data, Education, Family planning, Female children, Goals, International health, Maternal health, Reproductive health, Women's health

White House Council for Women and Girls. 2014. Women and girls of color: Addressing challenges and expanding opportunity. [Washington, DC]: White House Council for Women and Girls, 53 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights federal and other policies, programs, and initiatives that impact women and girls of color in the United States. Topics include health disparities, HIV/AIDS, maternal and child health, nutrition and physical activity, research, sexual and reproductive health, adolescent pregnancy, and workplace safety. Barriers and disparities related to education, economic security, violence, and criminal and juvenile justice are also addressed.

Keywords: Administrative policy, Adolescent females, Barriers, Female children, Initiatives, Policy development, Public policy, Women

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Women's Health. 2013. Counseling support tool: BFWHW guide for adolescent girls and young women (upd. ed.). [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Women's Health, 3 pp.

Annotation: This support tool helps providers make physical activity and healthy eating recommendations to adolescent girls and young women based on their answers to the “Getting Started” questionnaire in the guide My Bright Future: Physical Activity and Health Eating for Adolescent Girls and Young Women. It provides a set of questions that assess current behaviors on a typical day, based on the general recommendations and guidelines from the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2008 and the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010. The support tool refers to the guide and the wallet card for additional information.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Guidelines, Nutrition, Physical activity, Young women

Dworsky A, Napolitano L, Barisik E, Reddy S, Simon M. 2013. The Demoiselle-2-Femme (D2F) pregnancy prevention program evaluation: Findings from the first baseline survey. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a baseline survey completed by 241 girls, primarily African American, in grade 9 through 11 who are participating in a federally funded evaluation of the Demoiselle-2-Femme signature after-school program in Chicago, Illinois. The purpose of the evaluation is to estimate the effects of program participation on a number of key behavioral outcomes, including sexual activity, unprotected sex, and adolescent pregnancy. The report presents background; describes the program; and discusses study design and methods; student characteristics; relationships with adults; attitudes, feelings, and knowledge about sexual behavior; sexual behavior and prior pregnancy; dating violence; tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use; and educational expectations.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent females, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Alcohol consumption behavior, Blacks, Community programs, Dating, Educational attainment, Illinois, Interpersonal violence, Marijuana, Prevention, Relationships, Smoking, Substance abuse

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2013. Contraception calling: Why aren't more young women listening?. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 15 pp.

Annotation: This paper discusses a 2013 nationally representative survey of adolescents and young adults about what women think about contraception. Topics include pregnancy intention versus behavior, what method of contraception single women use, contraception concerns, how their choice of method was made, and what contraception methods young women want.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Contraception, Contraceptive agents, Contraceptive devices, Contraceptive use, Family planning, Surveys, Women's health, Young women

National Women's Health Information Center. 2011. Best bones forever. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health; Washington, DC: Ad Council,

Annotation: This national campaign is designed to heighten awareness among girls (ages 9-14) about bone health by focusing on friendship and encouraging girls to get active and eat more foods with calcium and vitamin D. The campaign comprises materials, separate websites for girls and parents, and new products for girls. Website content includes facts on osteoporosis, activities to do as a family, a photo gallery and message board, recipe ideas, and printed materials. Information and resources for the media, partners, and educators are also provided.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 712E, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (800) 690-7650 Fax: (202) 205-2631 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent health promotion, Consumer education materials, Multimedia, Nutrition, Osteoporosis, Physical activity, Public awareness campaigns, Web sites

National Institute of Mental Health. 2011. Eating disorders. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Mental Health, 10 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information about eating disorders. The document explains what eating disorders are; discusses the different types of eating disorders including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder; explains how eating disorders are treated, and discusses how males are affected and what is being done to better understand and treat eating disorders.

Contact: National Institute of Mental Health, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20892-9663, Telephone: (866) 615-6464 Secondary Telephone: (301) 443-8431 Fax: (301) 443-4279 E-mail: nimhinfo@nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nimh.nih.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 11-4901.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent females, Adolescent males, Anorexia nervosa, Bulimia, Child behavior, Eating disorders, Female children, Male children, Treatment

National Conference of State Legislatures. 2011. HPV vaccine: State legislation and statutes. Denver, CO: National Conference of State Legislatures,

Annotation: This set of web pages provide information about state activity surrounding the issue of whether girls should be be required to be vaccinated against the Human Papillomavirus (HPV). Information is included on causes and symptoms of HPV, the nature of the debate, and available vaccinations. State actions related to this issue are presented, and links to resources are provided.

Contact: National Conference of State Legislatures, 7700 East First Place, Denver, CO 80230, Telephone: (303) 364-7700 Fax: (303) 364-7800 Web Site: http://www.ncsl.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent health, Cervical cancer, Human papillomavirus, Immunization, Prevention, Reproductive health, State legislation, Women's health

Fuentes L, Bayetti Flores V, Gonzalez-Rojas J. 2010. Removing stigma: Towards a complete understanding of young Latinas' sexual health. New York, NY: National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, 10 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews recent research on adolescent sexuality and reproductive health, sets forth a reproductive justice framework for advancing the sexual health of Latina adolescents, and describes policy approaches that make healthy decisions possible and rewarding, so Latinas and all women can have healthy adolescent years, avoid pregnancy and birth when they want to, and have healthy pregnancies and children when and if they choose to become mothers.

Contact: National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, 50 Broad Street, Suite 1825, New York, NY 10004, Telephone: (212) 422-2553 Fax: (212) 422-2556 E-mail: NLIRH@LatinaInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.latinainstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Female children, Hispanic Americans, Pregnancy prevention, Reproductive health, Sexual health, Young women

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health. [2009]. Action steps for improving women's mental health. Washington, DC: Office on Women's Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 56 pp.

Annotation: This report proposes a series of action steps that can be taken to promote change and support progress to improve the mental and overall health of women and girls. The action steps use a public health approach that addresses the mental health needs and concerns of women and girls.A rationale for the action steps is provided, along with a description of the methodology and objectives. Lists of programs and tools for adults and youth are included.

Contact: National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information, Telephone: (800) 729-6686 Secondary Telephone: (800) 487-4889 Web Site: http://ncadi.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Community programs, Diagnosis, Female children, Mental health, Prevention, Treatment, Women's health

Altarum Institute. 2009. Bodyworks evaluation final report. [Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 50 pp.

Annotation: This evaluation final report provides information about Bodyworks, a program designed to help parents and caregivers of girls ages 8-17 improve family eating and physical activity habits. The program focuses on parents as role models and provides them with hands-on tools to make small, specific changes to prevent obesity and help maintain a healthy weight. The evaluation provides background information and discusses the purpose of the program and discusses the evaluation purpose and design, the process evaluation, outcomes for parents and caregivers and for girls.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 712E, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (800) 690-7650 Fax: (202) 205-2631 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent females, Adolescent health, Child behavior, Child health, Families, Female children, Nutrition, Obesity, Parents, Physical activity, Prevention, Program evaluation, Programs, Weight loss, Weight management

Sabatiuk L, Flores R. 2009. Toward a common future: Latino teens and adults speak out about teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 32 pp.

Annotation: This pamphlet, which is geared toward Latino adolescents; presents perspectives on adolescent pregnancy and sexual activity in the voices of Latino adolescent males and females. Statistics about adolescent pregnancy and parenting are also provided.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent females, Adolescent males, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Consumer education materials, Contraception, Hispanic Americans, Prevention

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Women's Health. 2007. Teen survival guide: Health tips for on-the-go girls. Washington, DC: Office of Women's Health, U.S.Health Resources and Services Administration, 76 pp.

Annotation: This publication, which is geared toward adolescent girls, provides health information presented in a reader-friendly manner. Topics covered include (1) taking care of your reproductive health, (2) taking care of a beautiful you, inside and out, (3) feeling good about yourself, (4) taking charge of your world, and (5) planning your future. A glossary is included.

Contact: National Women's Health Information Center, 8270 Willow Oaks Corporate Drive, Fairfax, VA 22031, Telephone: (800) 994-9662 Secondary Telephone: (888) 220-5446 Fax: (703) 560-6598 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent health, Bullying, Careers, Consumer education materials, Families, Menstruation, Nutrition, Peer pressure, Physical activity, Reproductive health, Safety, Self-esteem, Sexually transmitted infections, Stress, Substance abuse

Steingraber S. 2007. The falling age of puberty in U.S. girls: What we know, what we need to know. San Francisco, CA: Breast Cancer Fund, 72 pp.

Annotation: This report examines five topics related to early puberty in U.S. females. Part 1 looks at the harmful impacts of early puberty, including a potential link to breast cancer. Part 2 explores time trends in puberty both in the United States and abroad. Part 3 examines the regulation of puberty. Part 4 looks at the insights offered by evolutionary biology. Party 5 explores the various possible causes for the declining age of puberty in U.S. girls. Part 6 proposes recommendations for research and action based on current evidence.

Contact: Breast Cancer Fund, 1388 Sutter Street, Suite 400, San Francisco, CA 94109, Telephone: (866) 760-TBCF Secondary Telephone: (415) 346-8223 Web Site: http://www.BreastCancerFund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Breast cancer, Breastfeeding, Female children, Obesity, Precocious puberty, Prematurity, Research, Television, Trends

National Adolescent Health Information Center. 2006. 2006 fact sheet on suicide: Adolescents and young adults. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent Health Information Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet presents information about suicide among adolescents and young adults (ages 10-24). The fact sheet includes highlights; a pie chart showing suicide's ranking among the leading causes of death in this population; and information about the suicide rates among young adults vs. younger adolescents; suicide rates among young males, young females, and American Indian and Alaska Native males; rates of attempted suicide among female adolescents and female Hispanic adolescents; and trends in suicide rates. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the fact sheet. Data and figure sources and notes are included.

Contact: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco, LHTS Suite 245, Box 0503, San Francisco, CA 94143-0503, Telephone: (415) 502-4856 Fax: (415) 502-4858 E-mail: nahic@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://nahic.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent males, Adolescents, Alaska natives, American Indians, Attempted suicide, Hispanic Americans, Suicide, Trends, Young adults

Babey SH, Diamant AL, Brown R, Hastert T. 2005. California adolescents increasingly inactive. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 7 pp. (Health policy research brief)

Annotation: This report provides information on the physical activity status of California adolescents. The report discusses the percentages of California adolescents who get regular, some, and no physical activity; the status of girls, Latinos, Asians, and African Americans; the lack of safe parks and open spaces; and the importance of physical education. Policy recommendations, the data source, and author information are also included. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report includes endnotes.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent health, Asian Americans, Blacks, California, Hispanic Americans, Physical activity, Physical education

Schoenberg J, Salmond K, Fleshman P. 2004. Weighing in: Helping girls be healthy today, healthy tomorrow. New York, NY: Girl Scout Research Institute, 33 pp. (Research review)

Annotation: This report identifies key research trends for children and adolescents in the areas of health, nutrition, and physical activity as they relate to child obesity and weight issues. The report also focuses on gender and cultural issues in the research, especially with regard to girls' body image. The main social environments in which girls participate are explored, as is the role of media and marketing. Conclusions and next steps, references, and resources are included.

Contact: Girl Scouts of the USA, 420 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10018-2798, Telephone: (800) 478-7248 Secondary Telephone: (212) 852-8000 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.girlscouts.org $3.50, plus shipping and handling; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent health, Body image, Child health, Cultural factors, Female children, Marketing, Mass media, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Research, Trends

Minnesota Department of Health, Family Health Division, MCH-FAS Prevention. 2004. Women and substance use in the childbearing years: A prevention primer. [Mounds View, MN]: Minnesota Prevention Resource Center, 155 pp.

Annotation: This primer discusses the problem of substance use, including alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs, in women and girls in Minnesota, especially during pregnancy; and describes how community education can address this problem, with information about specific groups including African Americans, American Indians, Latinos, and college students. The majority of the primer lists and describes resources in a wide variety of formats tohelp understand and educate others about these problems. Formats include printed materials, videos, Internet resources, resource centers, and services. Addresses of vendors are included. The primer includes eight appendices covering topics such as selecting information, community prevention strategies, recognizing and treating alcohol abuse and addiction, and a calendar of health observances.

Contact: Minnesota Prevention Resource Center, 38460 Lincoln Trail, Box 549, North Branch, MN 55056, Telephone: (651) 674-4085 Secondary Telephone: (877) 935-4426 Fax: (651) 277-4085 E-mail: mprc@cpyf.org Web Site: http://www.emprc.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Addiction, Adolescent females, Alcohol consumption behaviors, Bibliographies, Cigarette smoking, Communities, Depression, Directories, Domestic violence, Mental health, Minnesota, Pregnancy, Prevention, Public health, Risk factors, Sexual abuse, Substance abuse, Women's health

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.