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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (43 total).

Martinez M, Rider F, Cayce N, Forsell S, Poirier J, Hunt S, Crawford G, Sawyer J. 2013. A guide for father involvement in systems of care. Washington, DC: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, 50 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information about the importance of fathers in the lives of their children and identifies potential consequences of non-involvement. The guide also offers strategies for systems and families to help fathers become more involved. Topics include statistics about the presence or absence of fathers in their children's lives, why children need fathers to be actively involved, ways for systems of care to best support fathers' involvement in individual- and family-service plans, how systems of care can involve fathers in all dimensions of development, different cultural perspectives on fatherhood, the role of young fathers, grandfather involvement, and the role of fathers in the child welfare system.

Contact: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 403-6827 Fax: (202) 403-5007 E-mail: tapartnership@air.org Web Site: http://www.tapartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent fathers, Child development, Child welfare agencies, Cultural factors, Families, Father child relations, Fathers, Grandparents, Parenting skills, Service delivery systems

Scott ME, Steward-Streng NR, Manlove J, Moore KA. 2012. The characteristics and circumstances of teen fathers: At the birth of their first child and beyond. Child Trends, 6 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief presents a statistical portrait of adolescent fathers' characteristics at the time of their first child's birth; their union status (i.e., married, cohabiting, or not in a relationship) at the birth; their subsequent experience fathering a child, if any; and their residential status at birth and in young adulthood (i.e., whether they were living with their children).

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent parents, Age factors, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Fathers, Parent child relations, Public policy, Racial factors, Single parents, Statistical data, Young adults

Dworsky A, Wojnaroski M. 2012. An evaluation of the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services new birth assessment. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the evaluation of a policy implemented by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) in March 2011 that calls for the completion of a "new birth assessment" every time a DCFS adolescent becomes a parent, whether by giving birth or by fathering a child. In addition to providing background and context, the report discusses the new birth assessment, study purpose and methods, specialty worker and supervisor interviews, young parent interviews, analysis of data from agency records, and implications for research and practice.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent fathers, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Evaluation, Illinois, Interviews, Research, State programs

Cobb-Clark DA, Tekin E. 2011. Fathers and youth's delinquent behavior. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 48 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17507)

Annotation: This paper analyzes the relationship between having one or more father figures in a young person's life and the likelihood that he or she will engage in delinquent criminal behavior. The paper focuses on the distinctions between the roles of residential and non-residential, biological fathers as well as stepfathers, and reports on differences observed based on the presence or absence of a father figure and on the gender of the child. The data analyzed in the study comes from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health administered by the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website after free registration.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Behavior development, Fathers, Juvenile delinquency, Longitudinal Research, Outcome evaluation, Parent child relations

Maynard RA, ed. 2008. Kids having kids: Economic costs and social consequences of teen pregnancy [2nd ed]. Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press, 448 pp.

Annotation: This book consists of a background study of the historical and international trends in adolescent pregnancy and the effects of early pregnancy on the mother's and, eventually, the child's education, work history, and life-long earnings. Seven coordinated studies then focus on specific elements in the data and use statistical projections that take into account other social factors, such as education, race, marital status, cultural background, and neighborhood crime incidence, to estimate the consequences of early pregnancy for the mothers, for the fathers, for the children (health, abuse, incarceration, life chances), and for society. Numerous tables and graphs illustrate the data.

Contact: University Press of America, 4501 Forbes Boulevard, Suite 200, Lanham, MD 20706, Telephone: (410) 459-3366 Secondary Telephone: (800) 462-6420 Web Site: http://www.univpress.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-87766-654-7.

Keywords: Adolescent employment, Adolescent fathers, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Child abuse, Child support, Child welfare, Demography, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Employment, Family income, Health care utilization, Incarcerated youth, Low income groups, Maternal age, Pregnant adolescents, Psychosocial predictors, Social support, Statistics, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. [2005]. Faith, hope, and love: How Latino faith communities can help prevent teen pregnancy. [Washington, DC]: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 12 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information about how faith leaders in Latin American communities can help prevent adolescent pregnancy. The guide discusses why faith leaders should get involved and describes ways they can help in these areas: (1) be a cultural bridge between parents and adolescents, (2) send a clear message to kids and to adults, (3) don't leave out fathers and sons, (4) help adolescents set goals and standards, (5) support and celebrate excellence and achievement, (6) be aware of adolescent culture, (7) be open to adolescent perspectives, (8) reach out to young people who are not at church, (9) give youth something to say "yes" to, and (10) enlist others. The guide is available on the web site in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Fathers, Hispanic Americans, Parents, Prevention, Religious organizations, Spanish language materials

Lombardi J, Bogle MM, eds. 2005. Beacon of hope: The promise of Early Head Start for America's youngest children. Washington, DC: Zero to Three Press, 224 pp.

Annotation: This book describes the Early Head Start Program -- how it came into being and what it offers young children and families. The book provides an overview of the program and discusses (1) how to improve the odds for infants and toddlers from families with low incomes, (2) the program's role in promoting good-quality child care for low-income families, (3) services for pregnant women, (4) nurturing early learning, (5) fathers, (6) adolescent parents, (7) infant mental health, (8) infants and toddlers with disabilities, and (9) Early Head Start and state partnerships. Each chapter includes references. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the book. The book includes one appendix: members of the advisory committee on services for families with infants and toddlers.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0943657652.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Child care, Children with special health care needs, Disabilities, Early Head Start, Early childhood education, Families, Fathers, Federal programs, Infants, Infants with special health care needs, Low income groups, Mental health, Pregnant women, Young children

Carlson MJ. 2005. Family structure, father involvement and adolescent behavioral outcomes. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 29 pp. (Working paper no. 05-10)

Annotation: This paper uses data on biological fathers' relationships with their adolescent children to assess whether father involvement mediates the relationship between family structure (i.e., father absence) and four measures of adolescent behavior. The paper, which includes an abstract, discusses theoretical perspectives and previous research, data and methods, and results. Three tables appear at the end of the paper. A discussion and references are included.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Families, Father child relations, Fathers, Relationships, Research

Texas Office of the Attorney General. 2005. Parenting two-gether: Birth to 12 months. Austin, TX: Texas Office of the Attorney General, 134 pp.

Annotation: This booklet, which is geared toward new single fathers, addresses questions and concerns that new fathers may have. It discusses the benefits of establishing legal fatherhood and why it's important to be involved in a child's life, and it provides ideas for building a strong, loving connection to the child, steps for strengthening the relationship with the other parent, information on establishing legal paternity, and information on the value of involved fathers.

Contact: Texas Office of the Attorney General, P.O. Box 12548, Austin, TX 78711-2548, Telephone: (512) 936-1737 Fax: (512) 469-3157 Web Site: http://www.oag.state.tx.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent fathers, Consumer education materials, Father child relations, Fathers, Infant behavior, Infant care, Infant feeding, Infants, Newborn infants, Paternity, Relationships, Single fathers

National Fatherhood Initiative. [2004]. Family structure, father closeness, and delinquency. Gaithersburg, MD: National Fatherhood Initiative, 29 pp.

Annotation: Using both a bivariate regression model and several multiple regression models, this paper sets out to test the hypothesis that family structure has a significant impact on the level of risk of adolescent delinquency even when controlling for other factors that encourage or inhibit delinquent acts. The paper also explores why family structure is important in determining delinquency in adolescents, and, specifically, it explores the role of "father closeness, " both in accounting for the importance of an intact family as an inhibitor of delinquency and as an important factor inhibiting delinquency in its own right. The paper includes an executive summary. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the paper. The paper concludes with a list of references.

Contact: National Fatherhood Initiative, 101 Lake Forest Boulevard, Suite 360 , Gaithersburg, MD 20877, Telephone: (301) 948-0599 Fax: (301) 948-4325 Web Site: http://www.fatherhood.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Families, Father child relations, Fathers, High risk adolescents, Juvenile delinquency, Juvenile delinquents, Risk factors

National Fatherhood Initiative. [2004]. Family structure, father closeness, and drug abuse. Gaithersburg, MD: National Fatherhood Initiative, 29 pp.

Annotation: Using both a bivariate regression model and several multiple regression models, this paper sets out to test the hypothesis that family structure has a significant impact on the level of risk of adolescent drug use even when controlling for other factors that encourage or inhibit delinquent acts. The paper also explores why family structure is important in determining drug use in adolescents, and, specifically, it explores the role of "father closeness, " both in accounting for the importance of an intact family as an inhibitor of drug use and as an important factor inhibiting drug use is presented in tables throughout the paper. The paper concludes with a list of references.

Contact: National Fatherhood Initiative, 101 Lake Forest Boulevard, Suite 360 , Gaithersburg, MD 20877, Telephone: (301) 948-0599 Fax: (301) 948-4325 Web Site: http://www.fatherhood.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Families, Father child relations, Fathers, High risk adolescents, Risk factors, Substance abuse

Lindsay JW. 2004. Teens parenting: The challenge of toddlers—Parenting your child from one to three. (3rd ed.). Buena Park, CA: Morning Glory Press, 222 pp. (Teens parenting)

Annotation: This book and workbook are a guide to help adolescent parents care for their one to three year old children. It is written at a sixth grade reading level. Topics covered include nutrition, sleep, language development, health and safety, and activities of toddlers. The needs and responsibilities of adolescent parents are addressed with guidance on planning for the future and dealing with extended family living situations. The workbook is designed to help adolescents understand the material presented in the book through answering questions, writing out their thoughts and feelings, playing games with their children, and carrying out projects such as preparing a chart on birth control options.

Contact: Morning Glory Press, 6595 San Haroldo Way, Buena Park, CA 90620-3748, Telephone: (888) 612-8254 Fax: (888) 327-4362 E-mail: info@morningglorypress.com Web Site: http://www.morningglorypress.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent fathers, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent parents, Child health, Early childhood development, Parenting, Young children

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 2004. Teen pregnancy prevention: Dads make a difference. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 3 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses how parental influence can affect children's decisions about sex, love, and values. The fact sheet discusses what research says about parental influence, the media's role in influencing adolescents, adolescent boys, the role of fathers, and what parents can do.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Families, Fathers, Love, Mass media, Moral values, Parent child relations, Parents, Prevention, Research

Berglas N, Brindis C, Cohen J. 2003. Adolescent pregnancy and childbearing in California. Sacramento, CA: California Research Bureau, 56 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an overview of adolescent pregnancy and childbearing based on current research literature and focus groups with adolescents in California. The report addresses the following questions: (1) What are the current trends in adolescent sexual behavior, pregnancy, and childbearing in the United States? (2) What are the causes of adolescent sexual activity, pregnancy, and childbearing? (3) What are the consequences of adolescent childbearing for the mother, father, and infant? What are the economic costs to society? (4) What efforts have been made in California to address this issue? (5) What do California adolescents think about adolescent sexuality and pregnancy? Policy options involving the enhancement of family life education capacity of schools and families and other factors that influence adolescent decision-making are discussed. The report concludes with references. Statistical information is provided figures at the beginning of the report.

Contact: California Research Bureau, California State Library, 900 N Street, Suite 300, Sacramento, CA 94237-0001, Telephone: (916) 445-3551 Secondary Telephone: (916) 653-7843 Fax: (916) 654-5829 E-mail: crb@library.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.library.ca.gov/crb/index.html Available from the website. Document Number: CRB-03-007; ISBN 1-58703-176-0.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, California, Costs, Families, Fathers, Infants, Mothers, Prevention programs, Trends

Hutchins VL. 2001. Maternal and child health at the millennium: Looking back, moving forward. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 62 pp.

Annotation: This publication provides an overview of the federal Maternal and Child Health (MCH) program's evolution in consultation, technical assistance, policy development and dissemination, and data collection and analysis, from the establishment of the Children's Bureau in 1912 to the present. The publication uses four selected areas—newborn screening, mental retardation, heart disease, and school health/health of school age children—to illustrate how the MCH program development principles have incorporated scientific and technological advances into promoting the health of the nation's children and families. The publication discusses the problems that the MCH program will face in the future, including unresolved problems from the 20th century and new problems. References are included in the document. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child health, Children, Children's Bureau, Families, Fathers, Health promotion, Healthy People 2010, Heart diseases, History, Infants, MCH programs, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Mental retardation, Neonatal screening, Parents, Pregnant women, Program development, School age children, School health, Social Security Act, Title V, Title V programs

Black M, Bentley M, Lambert,S, Abel Y, Minor S. 2000. African-American adolescent mothers, their babies, and their babies' fathers. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 2 pp. (Research roundtable special research presentation)

Annotation: This document announces a special research presentation that will disseminate findings from three research projects funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Topics will include the relationship between paternal roles and the well-being of children from African-American families with low incomes, the role of fathers in these families, and determinants of feeding practices and the intergenerational factors involved in decision-making about infant feeding. An overview of the presentation and the reactor's materials in PowerPoint, a slide show and a QuickTime presentation are available from the Web site.

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent parents, Blacks, Fathers, Research

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 1999. Get organized: A guide to preventing teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 3 v.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Contact Phone: (202) 261-5591 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent pregnancy, Business, Community participation, Fathers, Financial support, Media campaigns, Needs assessment, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Religious organizations, School linked programs

Ayer EH. 1998. Everything you need to know about teen fatherhood [Rev. ed]. New York, NY: Rosen Publishing Group, 64 pp. (The need to know library)

Annotation: This book provides advice and information to adolescent males facing fatherhood. It discusses the emotional, physical, and financial consequences to adolescent pregnancy. It also examines the responsibilities of fatherhood, and the choices involved in dealing with an unexpected pregnancy.

Contact: Rosen Publishing Group, 29 East 21st Street, New York, NY 10010, Telephone: (800) 237-9932 Fax: (888) 436-4643 Web Site: http://www.rosenpublishing.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 8239-1532-8.

Keywords: Adolescent fathers, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Low literacy materials, Parenting, Patient education materials

Griffin MF, Curry BS, Sullivan J. 1998. Telling the Healthy Start story: A report on the impact of the 22 demonstration projects. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 163 pp.

Annotation: This book reports on the impact of Healthy Start programs in the areas of clients, service delivery systems, and communities. Client impact topics include: improved birth outcomes; change in health behaviors; opportunities for education; care coordination; reduction of barriers; availability of substance abuse programs; and special populations (adolescents, fathers, and women in jail). The service delivery strategies section covers these changes: collaboration and integration; enhanced clinical capacity and accessibility; and shared information. The section on communities discusses an increase in the following: consumer input; community participation; public awareness; community education; and economic and community development. Appendices provide brief profiles of Phase 1 Healthy Start projects and a bibliography of newspaper stories involving Healthy Start projects. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Barriers, Collaboration, Community development, Community participation, Education, Fathers, Health behavior, Healthy Start, Infant mortality, Pregnancy outcome, Prevention, Service coordination, Service delivery systems, Substance abuse

Luker K. 1996. Dubious conceptions: The politics of teenage pregnancy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 283 pp.

Annotation: This book addresses the current views and beliefs about adolescent pregnancy that influence social policy and political attitudes. The author presents the historical context of adolescent pregnancy and parenthood, and traces how attitudes about and approaches to dealing with these issues have changed. Quotes from the mothers involved illustrate the discussions of why adolescents get pregnant, how it affects the lives and future prospects of the adolescents and those of their babies, how sex education affects their behavior, and the impact of their socioeconomic status and upbringing on their goals and behavior.

Contact: Harvard University Press, 79 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (800) 405-1619 Secondary Telephone: 401-531-2800 Fax: (800) 406-9145 E-mail: contact_hup@harvard.edu Web Site: http://www.hup.harvard.edu Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-674-21702-0 .

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent employment, Adolescent fathers, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Child welfare, Consent, Demography, Educational attainment, Family income, Marital status, Maternal age, Policy development, Pregnant adolescents, Sexual behavior, Sexually transmitted diseases, Social conditions, Social policy, Social values, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.