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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (443 total).

Bogenschneider K, Small S, Riley D. n.d.. An ecological, risk-focused approach for addressing youth-at-risk issues. Chevy Chase, MD: National 4-H Center, 24 pp.

Annotation: This paper presents a prevention model to reduce problem behavior in adolescents by identifying risk factors and protective factors in an adolescent's environment and targeting gaps between the two at all stages of the adolescent's environmental system—individual, family, peers, school, work, and community. The paper reviews current research on risk and protective factors that influence the well being of youth and suggests implications of this research for developing comprehensive community based prevention programs.

Contact: National 4-H Council, 7100 Connecticut Avenue, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, Telephone: (301) 961-2800 E-mail: info@fourhcouncil.edu Web Site: http://www.fourhcouncil.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Community programs, Environmental influences, Models, Prevention programs, Protective factors, Risk factors

Werner EE. n.d.. Final report: The Kauai Study—Follow-up at adolescence. [Los Angeles, CA: University of California at Los Angeles?], 398 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this report is to present the findings of the fourth phase of a longitudinal study of a multi-racial cohort of youth, born on the island of Kauai, Hawaii in 1955. The results of the first three phases of the study (prenatal period to age 10) were published in the book The Children of Kauai (1971). The purposes of this report are to follow up where the previous study left off at age 10, to document the course of the learning and behavior disorders diagnosed in childhood, to take a look at new problems and new promises in adolescence, to examine a concerned community's response to its at risk youth, to consider factors that contributed to improvement, and to evaluate the predictive power of the diagnostic tools of the previous phases of the study. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Hawaii, Learning disabilities, Reports

Healthy Teen Network and ETR Associates. n.d.. Weaving science & practice: Frequently asked questions about science-based approaches. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 20 pp.

Annotation: This document describes seven science-based approaches in adolescent pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infection prevention. Topics include assessment, health education and behavior change theory, logic models, science-based programs, adaptation and fidelity, characteristics of promising programs, and process and outcome evaluation. Additional topics include the benefits of using science-based approaches, ten steps for getting to outcomes, and training and technical assistance.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Assessment, Behavior modification, HIV, Health behavior, Health education, Methods, Models, Outcome evaluation, Prevention programs, Process evaluation, Sexually transmitted diseases

Neufeld L, Gero A. [2017]. Adolescent oral health campaign final report: 2016-2017 school year. [Salt Lake City, UT: Utah Department of Health, Oral Health Program], 9 pp.

Annotation: This final report provides information about activities of the Adolescent Oral Health Campaign during academic year 2016–2017. The purpose of the campaign was to educate students in middle school and high school in Utah, especially along the Wasatch Front, about oral health. The goal was to increase positive oral health behaviors and increase use of oral health services. The report describes the campaign’s goals, objectives, methods, and results.

Contact: Utah Department of Health, Oral Health Program, P.O. Box 142002, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-2002, Telephone: (801) 273-2995 Web Site: http://health.utah.gov/oralhealth Available from the website.

Keywords: , Adolescent health, Final reports, Health behaviors, Health education, High school students, Middle schools, Oral health, State surveys, Students, Utah

American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health. 2017. Your teens may think that they don't need you anymore, but they'll always need their teeth!. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health, 3 items.

Annotation: These resources for parents provide guidance on helping adolescents make decisions that affect their oral health and overall health. Topics include toothbrushing, flossing, visiting the dentist, eating healthy foods, avoiding tobacco, and drinking water with fluoride. The resources are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 E-mail: fluoride@aap.org Web Site: http://www.ilikemyteeth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Consumer education materials, Decision making, Dental caries, Health behavior, Health literacy, Multimedia, Oral health, Preventive health services, Spanish language materials

Jensen F. 2017. The power of the adolescent brain. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1 video (30 min.) (Think, Act, Grow (TAG) Talks)

Annotation: This video shares what researchers have learned about adolescent brain development, functioning, and capacity. It explains the strengths and potential of the adolescent brain; addresses learning, risk behavior, addiction, and mental health issues; and provides practical suggestions for families with adolescents. The video is available as a full-length (30 minute) program, as well as in short, individual segments, and is accompanied by citations, additional resources, a guide to technical terms, and discussion guides for professionals and family members.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2846 E-mail: oah.gov@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior, Child development, Families, Health promotion, Mental health, Protective factors, Resources for professionals, Risk taking

Lorenzo SB, Wilhite BC. 2016. Overweight and obesity in kids and teens: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find care, services, and support and websites about overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Bibliographies, Body weight, Child health, Children, Diet, Electronic publications, Exercise, Families, Health behavior, Nutrition, Obesity, Weight gain, Weight management

National Physical Activity Plan Alliance, Report Card Research Advisory Committee. 2016. The 2016 United States report card on physical activity for children and youth. Columbia, SC: National Physical Activity Plan Alliance, 38 pp., exec. summ. (4 pp.).

Annotation: This document presents the results of a comprehensive evaluation of the physical activity levels and the indicators influencing physical activity of children and youth in the United States. Contents include the methodology, abbreviations and definitions, benefits and guidelines for routine physical activity, and a summary of indicators and grades. Topics include overall physical activity, sedentary behaviors, active transportation, organized sport participation, active play, health-related fitness, family and peers, school, community and the built environment, and government strategies and investments. Data sources and references are included.

Contact: National Physical Activity Plan Alliance, 921 Assembly Street, Suite 212, Columbia, SC 29208, Telephone: (866) 365-5122 Fax: (803) 777-2504 E-mail: info@physcialactivityplan.org Web Site: http://www.physicalactivityplan.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Environmental influences, Health behaviors, Health policy, Physical activity, Statistical data

National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center. 2016. Evidence-based clinical preventive services for adolescents and young adults. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides recommendations on clinical preventive services for adolescents and young adults. Topics include substance use, reproductive health, mental health, nutrition and exercise, immunizations, and safety and violence. Resources are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco, LHTS Suite 245, Box 0503, San Francisco, CA 94143-0503, Telephone: (415) 502-4856 Fax: (415) 502-4858 E-mail: nahic@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://nahic.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Counseling, Health behavior, Preventive health services, Screening, Young adults

Delta Dental of Michigan, Ohio, and Indiana. 2016. Rethink your drink, think water. Okemos, MI: Delta Dental Foundation, 2 items.

Annotation: These resources provide information about sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and tips on healthy alternatives. Contents include a poster and a brochure. Topics include the potential impact of SSB consumption on oral health; the amount of sugar in different beverages; and recommended daily limits on sugar for infants, children, adolescents, and adults. Information about reading nutrition labels, limiting juice, and choosing water is provided. A form for ordering a drink display kit is also available.

Contact: Delta Dental Foundation, 4100 Okemos Road, Okemos, MI 48864, Telephone: (800) 524-0149 Web Site: http://www.deltadentalmi.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Children, Consumer education materials, Decision making, Fluid intake, Health behavior, Infants, Oral health, Public awareness campaign materials, Resources for professionals, Sugar, Sweetening agents, Water

Kann L, Olsen EO, McManus T, Harris WA, Shanklin SL, Flint KH, Queen B, Lowry R, Chyen D, Whittle L, Thornton J, Lim C, Yamakawa Y, Brenner N, Zaza S. 2016. Sexual identify, sex of sexual contacts, and health-related behaviors among students in grades 9–12: United States and selected sites, 2015. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 65(9):1–202,

Annotation: This report summarizes results for 118 health-related behaviors plus obesity, overweight, and asthma by sexual identity and sex of sexual contacts from the 2015 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 25 state surveys, and 19 large urban school district surveys conducted among students in grades 9–12. Contents include a description of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, survey methodology, and survey results for the prevalence of health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students compared with nonsexual minority students. Recommendations for reducing disparities in health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students are also included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Comparative analysis, Health behavior, Health surveys, Individual characteristics, Minority groups, National surveys, Population surveillance, Prevalence, Risk factors, Risk taking, School districts, School surveys, Sex factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Sexual identity, Sexual partners, State surveys, Statistical data, Urban population

University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health. 2016. Social factors affecting pediatric oral health in North Dakota. Grand Forks, ND: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about students' oral hygiene practices and consumption of sugar-containing beverages. It discusses third-grade students' access to toothbrushes, toothbrushing and flossing practices, and consumption of sugar-containing beverages, as well as whether they have visited a dentist; middle school students’ toothbrushing practices and consumption of sugar-containing beverages; and high school students’ consumption of soda.

Contact: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 501 North Columbia Road Stop 9037, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037, Telephone: (701) 777-3848 Fax: (701) 777-6779 E-mail: ruralhealth@med.und.edu Web Site: https://ruralhealth.und.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, American Indians, Children, Dental caries, Health behavior, Low income groups, Minority groups, North Dakota, Nutrition, Oral health, Oral hygiene, Prevalence, Rural population, Social factors, State surveys, Statistical data, Sugar

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2016. Preventing childhood obesity in Michigan's classrooms: A collaboration between Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and statewide partners. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 4 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet describes Building Healthy Communities, a school-based prevention program in Michigan to help children adopt healthy habits at a young age by providing access to healthy food, health education, physical education, and physical activity. Contents include a description of the program's development and implementation process, outcomes, and next steps. Topics include partnering organization efforts to pool funding, resources, and expertise to engage elementary schools and expand to middle and high schools throughout the state.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior modification, Children, Collaboration, Curriculum, Elementary schools, Health behavior, Health promotion, High schools, Michigan, Middle schools, Nutrition education, Nutrition services, Obesity, Outcome and process assessment, Physical activity, Physical education, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Public private partnerships, School health education, School health programs, State programs, Statewide planning

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 2015, 2013. Tips to help faith leaders and their communities address teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 20 pp.

Annotation: This publication is designed to help religious and secular leaders engage adolescents in conversations about sex and adolescent pregnancy within the context of their religious beliefs. Contents include nine tips to help faith leaders and their communities address adolescent pregnancy. The publication is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Communication, Prevention, Religious beliefs, Sexual behavior, Spanish language materials, Spirituality

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2015–. Parent engagement. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to assist parents and school staff in working together to support and improve the learning, development, and health of children and adolescents. Contents include fact sheets for school districts and school administrators, teachers and other school staff, and parents and families. A strategy guide for state and local education agencies on selecting and implementing parent engagement strategies specific to HIV/STD prevention and a facilitator's guide for staff development are also included.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Child development, Child health, Family support, Health behavior, Learning, Parents, Protective factors, School age children, School districts, School personnel, Schools, Social support, Students, Teachers

Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. 2015. Marijuana talk kit: What you need to know to talk with your teen about marijuana . New York, NY: Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, 20 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to help parents talk to adolescents about marijuana. Contents include facts about marijuana and why it is risky for adolescents, ways to talk with adolescents about marijuana including what to say and what not to say, how to respond to adolescents' questions and arguments, and resources to help.

Contact: Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, 352 Park Avenue South, 9th Floor, New York, NY 10010, Telephone: (855) 378-4373 Secondary Telephone: (212) 922-1560 Fax: (212) 922-1570 E-mail: webmail@drugfree.org Web Site: http://www.drugfree.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Communication, Drug use behavior, Marijuana, Parents, Risk factors

Carney C, McGehe D, Harland K, Weiss M, Raby M. 2015. Using naturalistic driving data to assess the prevalence of environmental factors and driver behaviors in teen driver crashes. Washington, DC: AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, 69 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a study to examine naturalistic data from crashes that involved adolescent drivers. Topics include characteristics of drivers and passengers, roadway and environment, crashes, vehicle-to-vehicle crashes, and single-vehicle crashes; and driver and passenger behaviors. Contents include a detailed description of the study methodology and the coding sheet with variable definitions.

Contact: AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, 607 14th Street, N.W., Suite 201, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 638-5944 Fax: (202) 638-5943 E-mail: info@aaafoundation.org Web Site: http://www.aaafoundation.org/home/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior, Data analysis, Environment, External cause of injury codes, Motor vehicle crashes, Research methodology, Risk factors, Risk taking, Safety, Transportation injuries, Unintentional injuries

Levi J, Segal LM, De Biasi A, Martin A. 2015. Reducing teen substance misuse: What really works. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 99 pp.

Annotation: This report includes state-by-state youth drug overdose death rates and rankings, and a report card for how well states scored on 10 key indicators of leading evidence-based policies and programs that can improve the wellbeing of children and youth and have been connected with preventing and reducing misuse of alcohol, tobacco or other drugs.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Drug use attitudes, Drug use behavior, Health education, Health policy, Prevention programs, Protective factors, Risk factors, Smoking, Tobacco use, Young adults

Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Program. 2015. Texas oral health and Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System. Austin, TX: Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Program, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document presents findings on the relationship between preventive oral health care use and health behaviors among students in grades 9-12 in Texas. Contents include the percentage of students lacking dental visits within the past year by age; race/ethnicity; risk-taking behavior (drinking soda, tobacco use, marijuana use); and healthy behavior (physical activity and good school grades).

Contact: Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Improvement Program, P.O. Box 149347, Mail Code 1818, Austin, TX 78714-9347, Telephone: (512) 776-2008 Fax: (512) 776-7256 E-mail: dental@dshs.state.tx.us Web Site: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/dental/default.shtm Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, Adolescents, Age factors, Children, Comparative analysis, Dental care, Ethnic factors, Health behavior, Health care disparities, Health care utilization, National surveys, Nutrition, Oral health, Preventive health services, Risk taking, State surveys, Statistical data, Texas, Tobacco, Young adults

Roth MS, Allman A, Wilhite BC. 2014–. Health and wellness for adolescent girls and women with mental and behavioral health conditions: Knowledge path (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This knowledge path aims to bridge the public health and mental health information needs of professionals on approaches to promoting optimal health and wellness for women of childbearing age who experience a mental, emotional, or behavioral heath condition. The resource covers topics relevant to health promotion and disease prevention for all women, and specifically for women with mental and behavioral health disorders. Topics include reproductive and maternal health, intentional injury, chronic conditions, healthy behaviors, and health disparities. Contents include websites, distance learning tools, reports, data and statistics, journal articles and other literature and research, and guides on related topics. A separate brief presents resources for women and their families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Consumer education materials, Disease prevention, Emotional disorders, Health promotion, Mental health, Resources for professionals, Women

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.