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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (114 total).

Harris JL, Haraghey KS, Choi Y-Y, Fleming-Milici F. 2017. Parents' attitudes about food marketing to children: 2012 to 2015–Opportunities and challenges to creating demand for a healthier food environment. Hartford, CT: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, 75 pp.

Annotation: This report presents results of a survey of parents with children and adolescents ages 2 to 17 to measure parents' attitudes about food marketing and other influences on children's eating habits and their support for policies to promote healthy eating for their children. Topics include parents' opinions about food industry self-regulation, including the ages of children who should be protected from unhealthy food marketing and whether they believe that individual food companies have delivered on their pledges to limit food advertising to children. The report also examines parents' willingness to participate in a variety of actions to encourage companies to reduce unhealthy food marketing to their children. A series of infographics is also available.

Contact: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, University of Connecticut, One Constitution Plaza, Suite 600, Hartford, CT 06511, Telephone: (860) 380-1000 Fax: (860) 509-0009 E-mail: rudd.center@uconn.edu Web Site: http://www.uconnruddcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advocacy, Beliefs, Children, Consumer satisfaction, Consumer surveys, Food consumption, Marketing, Nutrition, Parent participation, Parenting attitudes, Policy development

Smith KV, Dye C, Rotz D, Cook E, Rosinsky K, Scott M. 2016. Final impacts of the Gender Matters Program. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 38 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a large-scale demonstration project and evaluation of Gender Matters (Gen.M), a sexuality education curriculum that aims to reduce adolescent pregnancy and associated sexual risk behaviors, in part by challenging commonly held perceptions of gender roles and promoting healthy, equitable relationships. The study reports final impacts of the program on adolescent sexual risk behaviors and other longer-term outcomes measured 18 months after participants enrolled in the study.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2846 E-mail: oah.gov@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Attitudes, Gender discrimination, Model programs, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Relationships, Risk taking, Sex characteristics, Sexual health

Levi J, Segal LM, De Biasi A, Martin A. 2015. Reducing teen substance misuse: What really works. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 99 pp.

Annotation: This report includes state-by-state youth drug overdose death rates and rankings, and a report card for how well states scored on 10 key indicators of leading evidence-based policies and programs that can improve the wellbeing of children and youth and have been connected with preventing and reducing misuse of alcohol, tobacco or other drugs.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Drug use attitudes, Drug use behavior, Health education, Health policy, Prevention programs, Protective factors, Risk factors, Smoking, Tobacco use, Young adults

Kearney MS, Levine PB. 2014. Media influences on social outcomes: The impact of MTV's 16 and pregnant on teen childbearing. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 43 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 19795)

Annotation: This paper explores the impact of a reality television series, MTV's 16 and Pregnant, on adolescent attitudes and outcomes. Contents include background information on the show's content and previous research on the impact of media exposure; a description of the data including Nielson ratings, Google trends, and Twitter activity; a descriptive analysis of adolescents' exposure to the show; and analyses of high frequency data on searches and tweets and data on adolescent births. Topics include changes in searches and tweets, geographic variation in viewership, and changes in adolescent birth rates.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org $5.

Keywords: , Abortion, Adolescent attitudes, Attitude change, Behavior modification, Contraception, Economic factors, Health behavior, Interactive media, Media, Outcome evaluation, Sexual behavior

Isaacs J. 2013. Unemployment from a child's perspective. Washington, DC: First Focus and Urban Institute, 20 pp.

Annotation: This brief, which is part of a series of issue briefs examining he impact of the recession on children, examines unemployment from a child's perspective. It addresses the following questions: How many children are affected by parental unemployment? How does parental job loss affect children? Who are the children of the unemployed? Where do the children of the unemployed live? To what extent are families with children covered by unemployment insurance? The brief also reviews policies affecting the safety net for children of the unemployed.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent attitudes, Child attitudes, Child development, Child health, Children, Ethnic factors, Families, Geographic factors, Health insurance, Low income groups, Parents, Poverty, Programs, Public policy, Racial factors, Statistical data, Unemployment

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health . 2013. Health snapshot: Hispanic adolescents in the United States. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health , (E-updates)

Annotation: This website provides information about Hispanic adolescents in the United States related to health care coverage, adolescent pregnancy, educational attainment, mental health, substance abuse, and weight. For each topic, links to information and programs are included. Background information about this population is also included.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2846 E-mail: oah.gov@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Cultural factors, Educational attainment, Mental health, Ethnic factors, Health insurance, Hispanic Americans, Obesity, Programs, Substance abuse

Child Trends Data Bank. 2013. Steroid use: Indicators on children and youth (upd.). [Bethesda, MD]: Child Trends Data Bank, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about anabolic steroid use among students in grades 8, 10, and 12. The report discusses the importance of the issue (including health problems and behavior problems related to steroid use in adolescents); trends; differences by gender, race, and HIspanic origin, and college plans; state and local estimates; international estimates; and national goals.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Athletes, Eduational factors, Ethnic factors, Mental health problems, Racial factors, Risk taking, Sex factors, Statistical data, Steroids, Substance abuse, Trends

Dworsky A, Napolitano L, Barisik E, Reddy S, Simon M. 2013. The Demoiselle-2-Femme (D2F) pregnancy prevention program evaluation: Findings from the first baseline survey. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a baseline survey completed by 241 girls, primarily African American, in grade 9 through 11 who are participating in a federally funded evaluation of the Demoiselle-2-Femme signature after-school program in Chicago, Illinois. The purpose of the evaluation is to estimate the effects of program participation on a number of key behavioral outcomes, including sexual activity, unprotected sex, and adolescent pregnancy. The report presents background; describes the program; and discusses study design and methods; student characteristics; relationships with adults; attitudes, feelings, and knowledge about sexual behavior; sexual behavior and prior pregnancy; dating violence; tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use; and educational expectations.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent females, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Alcohol consumption behavior, Blacks, Community programs, Dating, Educational attainment, Illinois, Interpersonal violence, Marijuana, Prevention, Relationships, Smoking, Substance abuse

U.S. Office of Minority Health. 2013. The Circle of Life multimedia program. [Rockville. MD]: U.S. Office of Minority Health,

Annotation: This website presents the Circle of Life multimedia program, a curriculum intended for American Indian/Alaska Native middle school students that is based on the medicine wheel, a teaching symbol about mental, physical, spiritual, and emotional wellness. This holistic health promotion model is meant to help students learn about making healthy choices to prevent disease such as HIV/AIDS. The curriculum is divided into seven chapter sessions that are 20-25 minutes each and is presented in a modular form that can be broken up or used in sequence either in or outside the classroom. Teacher notes and an accessible version of the curriculum are also available on the website.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health, The Tower Building, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2882 Secondary Telephone: (240) 453-2883 Fax: (240) 453-2883 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Alaska natives, American Indians, Child health, Curricula, Educational materials, HIV, Middle school students, Prevention, Sexually transmitted diseases

Avellino L, Eisler A. 2013. Keep it simple: Linking teens to sexual health care. Balitmore, MD: Healthy Teen Network; Atlanta, GA: CAI Global ,

Annotation: This 45-minute module is designed to help male and female adolescents ages 15-19 connect with health professionals who can provide contraception care and reproductive health care. The module addresses the question of why adolescents do not typically access such services, including lack of knowledge about their right to care, available services, and the location of health professionals in the community who can meet their needs. The module includes a short motion graphic that can be shared online as a stand-alone product to facilitate increased access, improve awareness about contraceptive methods available to adolescents, and promote linkages to care. The graphic is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Contraception, Contraceptive use, Reproductive health, Spanish language materials, Training materials

Wildsmith E, Barry M, Manlove J, Vaughn B. 2013. Teen pregnancy and childbearing. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 7 pp. (Adolescent health highlight)

Annotation: This report presents key research findings about teen pregnancy and childbearing, including information about numbers and rates, adolescent attitudes about teen pregnancy, and racial and geographic differences in teen birth rates. It also discusses research and program initiatives that focus on the role and responsibilities of males in teenage pregnancy and childbirth.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website. Document Number: Pub. no. 2013-05.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent pregnancy, Birth rates, Data, Prevention, Racial factors, Regional factors, Research, Statistics

Wildsmith E, Barry M, Vaughn B, Manlove J. 2013. Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Adolescent health highlight)

Annotation: This report presents key research findings about the trends in sexually transmitted disease (STD) rates among U.S. adolescents, discusses factors that heighten or reduce adolescents' risk of acquiring an STD, and provides information and resources on STD prevention and testing.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website. Document Number: Pub. no. 2013-07.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Data, Prevention, Reproductive health, Sexually transmitted diseases, Statistics, Trends

Huberman BK. 2012. Let's Talk Month planning guidebook. (Rev. ed.). Washington, D.C.: Advocates for Youth, 132 pp.

Annotation: This Let's Talk Month planning guidebook focuses on the importance of communication between adults and young people to help young people develop responsible behavior about sexuality. It includes information on planning and implementing Let's Talk Month; involving youth and youth-adult partnerships to promote parent-child communication; and working with media. It also includes sample forms and materials, work sheets and handouts for facilitators, and other resources.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent sexuality, Communication skills, Guidelines, Parent education programs, Sexuality education, Youth development

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2012. Report to the Congress on the prevention and reduction of underage drinking. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 884 pp.

Annotation: This report to Congress summarizes the status of the latest scientific research on adolescent alcohol use. It describes the characteristics and consequences of underage alcohol use and outlines the federal government's comprehensive efforts to address this problem. In addition, the report contains individual state reports required by the Sober Truth on Preventing Underage Drinking Act. These reports provide information on state-supported prevention and enforcement activities, programs, and policies.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Federal programs, Legislation, Prevention, Public policy, Research, State programs

Bandy T, Andrews KM, Moore KA. 2012. Disadvantaged families and child outcomes: The importance of emotional support for mothers. Child Trends, 9 pp. (Research-to-results brief)

Annotation: This research brief focuses on the link between the level of support that mothers facing social and economic disadvantages receive in raising their children and their children's development. The brief provides background on the challenges faced by children from socially and emotionally disadvantaged families, describes the analysis the authors conducted, and presents findings.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescents, Child attitudes, Child behavior, Child development, Children, Communities, Early childhood development, Families, Family support, High risk groups, Income factors, Low income groups, Mental health, Mothers, Research, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical data

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2012. Teen pregnancy and social media: The health communicator's social media toolkit. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

Annotation: This website presents a social media tool to help promote adolescent pregnancy prevention efforts. The quick reference guide, which is intended as a companion piece to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) Social Media Toolkit for Health Communicators, highlights a number of social media tools with adolescent-pregnancy-prevention messages from CDC. The website provide badges and buttons that can be placed on websites; contact-syndication information; e-cards; text that can be pasted onto a Facebook page posted on Twitter; links to podcasts, public service announcements, and mobile web pages; and widgets.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Social media, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Health promotion, Prevention

Scott ME, Steward-Streng NR, Manlove J, Moore KA. 2012. The characteristics and circumstances of teen fathers: At the birth of their first child and beyond. Child Trends, 6 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief presents a statistical portrait of adolescent fathers' characteristics at the time of their first child's birth; their union status (i.e., married, cohabiting, or not in a relationship) at the birth; their subsequent experience fathering a child, if any; and their residential status at birth and in young adulthood (i.e., whether they were living with their children).

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent parents, Age factors, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Fathers, Parent child relations, Public policy, Racial factors, Single parents, Statistical data, Young adults

Human Rights Campaign. 2012. Growing up LGBT in America: At home, at school, in the community. Washington, DC: Human Rights Campaign, 24 pp. (HRC youth survey report)

Annotation: This report, which provides information from a survey that measured key factors impacting the daily lives of over 10,000 lesbian, gay, bixexual, or transgender adolescents (ages 13-17) from every region of the United States, presents a picture of the difficulties that this population faces. The report includes a summary of the findings and presents information in the following categories: personal well-being, community, home and family, school and peers, and culture.

Contact: Human Rights Campaign, 1640 Rhode Island Avenue, N.W, Washington, DC 20036-4160, Telephone: (800) 777-4723 Secondary Telephone: (202) 216-1572 Fax: (202) 347-5323 Web Site: http://www.hrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Communities, Discrimination, Families, Homosexuality, Schools, Sexual identity, Surveys

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Mental Health Services. 2012. Preventing suicide: A toolkit for high schools. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 229 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is intended to help high schools, school districts, and their partners design and implement strategies to prevent suicide and promote behavioral health among students. Topics include getting started, helping at-risk students, after a suicide, staff education and training, parent and guardian education and outreach, student programs, and screening. Tools are included for each topic. Additional resources and handouts are also presented.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SMA-12-4669.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent mental health, Adolescents, Education, High school students, Outreach, Programs, Resource materials, School health, Screening, Suicide, Suicide prevention, Training

Chrisler A, Moore KA. 2012. What works for disadvantaged and adolescent parent programs: Lessons from experimental evaluations of social programs and interventions for children. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 23 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about programs that work and do not work to improve outcomes for adolescent parents with low incomes and their children. The fact sheet reviews 20 parenting programs that are geared toward enhancing parents' development, educating them about effective parenting methods, or both. The fact sheet introduces the issue and reports findings for programs in six outcome areas: child outcomes: health; child outcomes: behaviors and development; parent outcomes: reproductive health; parent outcomes: mental health and behaviors; parent outcomes: education, employment, and income; and parenting outcomes. Promising approaches and future research needs are also discussed.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behaviors, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescent parents, Child development Parent support programs, Child health, Education, Employment, Family income, High risk groups, Low income groups, Mental health, Parent support services, Parenting skills, Reproductive health, Research

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.