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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 6 (6 total).

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2016. 2015 annual report on the quality of care for children in Medicaid and CHIP: Chart pack. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 75 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes state reporting on the quality of health care service for children covered by Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) during the fiscal year. which generally covers care delivered during the calendar year. Contents include detailed analyses of state performance on publicly reported measures. Topics include the child core set, primary care access and preventive care, perinatal care, care of acute and chronic conditions, behavioral health care, oral health services, and trends in state performance. Reference tables and additional resources are also included. The information presented is abstracted from the Annual Secretary's Report on the Quality of Care for Children in Medicaid and CHIP.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Acute care, Adolescent health, Child health, Children's Health Insurance Program, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, High risk children, Measures, Medicaid, Mental health, Oral health, Perinatal care, Perinatal health, Preventive health services, Primary care, Program improvement, Progress reports, Quality assurance, State programs, Statistical data, Trends

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2016. 2015 annual report on the quality of care for adults in Medicaid: Chart pack. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 42 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes state reporting on the quality of health care furnished to adults covered by Medicaid during the fiscal year, which generally covers care delivered in the calendar year. Contents include detailed analyses of state performance on publicly-reported measures. Topics include the adult core set, primary care access and preventive care, perinatal care, care of acute and chronic conditions, and behavioral health care. Reference tables and additional resources are also included. The information presented is abstracted from the Annual Secretary's Report on the Quality of Care for Adults in Medicaid.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Acute care, Adults, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, High risk groups, Low income groups, Measures, Medicaid, Mental health, Perinatal care, Preventive health services, Primary care, Program improvement, Progress reports, Quality assurance, State programs, Statistical data

Healthy Schools Campaign. 2015. Addressing the health-related causes of chronic absenteeism: A toolkit for action. Chicago, IL: Healthy Schools Campaign, multiple items.

Annotation: This document focuses on preparing educators—particularly school district decision-makers—with knowledge and practical guidance for creating meaningful change to address health-related chronic absenteeism. Topics include background on chronic absenteeism and student health; identifying community health needs and data sources; and case studies, best practices, and proven school-based interventions to address the health conditions shown to have an especially significant impact on chronic absenteeism. Focus areas are asthma, oral health, behavioral health, food insecurity and acute illness. Additional topics include building effective partnerships and capacity to support student health.

Contact: Healthy Schools Campaign, 175 N. Franklin, Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-1810 Fax: (312) 419-1806 Web Site: http://www.healthyschoolscampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, Acute care, Asthma, Collaboration, Community action, Disease management, Health care delivery, Hunger, Mental health, Oral health, Policy development, Public private partnerships, School age children, School based management, School districts, Schools, Students, Sustainability

Soni A. 2014. The five most costly children's conditions, 2011: Estimates for the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized children, ages 0-17. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 6 pp. (MEPS statistical brief; no. 434)

Annotation: This statistical brief presents data from the Household Component of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey on medical expenditures associated with the five most costly conditions for children ages 0–17 in 2011. Topics include mental disorders, asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, trauma-related disorders, acute bronchitis and upper respiratory infections, and otitis media.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Acute diseases, Adolescents, Asthma, Bronchitis, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Costs, Infants, Mental disorders, Otitis media, Pediatric care, Pulmonary disorders, Respiratory diseases, Statistics, Trauma

Kleinman RE, ed. 2013. Pediatric nutrition handbook. (7th ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 1477 pp.

Annotation: This handbook is intended to serve as a ready reference for practicing clinicians on the requirements and metabolism of specific nutrients, methods of assessing nutrition status, and the nutrition support of healthy infants, children, and adolescents, as well as children with acute and chronic illness. Topics that arise frequently in pediatric practice, such as breastfeeding, the impact of diet on long-term health, the use of fast foods and vegetarian diets, food technology and novel foods or ingredients that may become available to consumers, and food labeling are also covered in individual chapters.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-58110-816-3.

Keywords: Acute diseases, Adolescents, Child health, Child nutrition, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Food, Food labeling, Food preferences, Infant nutrition, Manuals, Nutrients, Nutrition assessment, Nutritional status, Pediatrics, Technology, Vegetarianism

Lane PA, Buchanan GR, Hutter JJ, Austin RF, Britton HA, Rogers ZR, Eckman JR, DeBaun MR, Wang WC, Mathew P, Iden S, Recht M, Cohen JD, Fruge E, Embry L, Hsu L, Mueller BU, Goldsby R, Quinn CT, Mann M, Lloyd-Puryear MA. 2002. Sickle cell disease in children and adolescents: Diagnosis, guidelines for comprehensive care, and care paths and protocols for management of acute and chronic complications. [Rev. ed.]. [no place]: Sickle Cell Disease Care Consortium, 37 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides information about the diagnosis of sickle cell disease, an overview of comprehensive care, and clinical paths and protocols for the management of some of the more common acute and chronic complications. The manual includes the following main sections: (1) principles of care for children and adolescents with sickle cell disease, (2) diagnostic testing for the common sickle cell syndromes, (3) newborn screening follow-up guidelines, (4) sickle cell disease -- comprehensive care, (5) acute illness in sickle cell disease: illness requiring urgent medical care, (6) transfusion therapy for acute complications, (7) clinical care paths, (8) general anesthesia and surgery, (9) chronic transfusion protocol, (10) hydroxyurea protocol, (11) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, (12) transcranial doppler ultrasonography, and (13) references. Two appendices include a list of sickle cell disease care consortium members and a list of other contributors. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Sickle Cell Information Center, Grady Memorial Hospital, P. O. Box 109, 80 Jessie Hill Jr. Drive, S. E., Atlanta, GA 30303, Telephone: (404) 616-3572 Fax: (404) 616-5998 E-mail: aplatt@emory.edu Web Site: http://www.scinfo.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Acute diseases, Adolescents, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Comprehensive health care, Diagnosis, Disease management, Guidelines, Management, Neonatal screening, Protocols, Sickle cell disease, Sickle cell screening

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.