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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (1,678 total).

Bronheim S, Fiel S, Schidlow D, MagrabP, Boczar K, Dillon C. n.d.. Crossings: A manual for transition of chronically ill youth to adult health care. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Department of Health, 52 pp.

Annotation: This manual is intended as a guide for health professionals to establish a new health care delivery system for transitioning adolescents with chronic illness to adult health care. Health professionals learn about eight objectives: exploring one's commitment to transition, identification of initial partners; securing institutional support; assuring economic feasibility, developing a structure, developing a successful partnership, and achieving a successful transfer of patients. A self-assessment form is included.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Price unknown.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Health services, Special health care needs, Transition planning, Transitions, Young adults

McManus M, Kelly R, Newacheck P, Gephart J. n.d.. The role of Title V maternal and child health programs in assuring access to health services for adolescents. Washington, DC: McManus Health Policy, 36 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a 1989 survey of state Title V maternal and child health (MCH) programs and children with special health needs (CSHN) programs with respect to their roles in serving adolescents. The publication brings together the results of adolescent health initiatives from both MCH and CSHN perspectives in order to examine how these programs might be better coordinated and strengthened. The survey revealed that most Title V-supported programs routinely bill Medicaid (and, to a lesser extent, private insurance) for some services. Limited revenues are received from insurance due to inadequate billing capacity, the type of services offered by Title V programs, and low reimbursement from Medicaid. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Child health, Insurance, Maternal health, Medicaid, Social Security Act, Special health care needs, Title V

Western Pennsylvania Caring Foundation. n.d.. Public/private partnerships: A working model for children's health care. Pittsburgh, PA: Western Pennsylvania Caring Foundation, 1 videotape (VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape describes the Caring Program for Children and the Children's Health Insurance Program (Blue Cross/Blue Shield's BlueCHIP program) in Pennsylvania. It depicts the health care needs of children living in poverty and children of the uninsured working poor who do not qualify for Medicaid assistance, and explains the unique funding of this collaborative program. Appearances by Fred Rogers of "Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood" and by local medical and government officials underscore the need for this type of program, the reasons for its success, and the ways that public and private resources can join together to help ensure access to primary health care for children. The videotape concludes with a television clip describing the program on NBC's "America Close Up." [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Access to health care, Audiovisual materials, Child health, Corporate programs, Insurance, Local MCH programs, Medical assistance, Pennsylvania, Primary care, Public private partnerships, Videotapes

Hess,C. n.d.. State MCH Director Program Development: Legal Assistance Project [Final report]. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs , 42 pp.

Annotation: This project was designed to improve the ability of State Maternal and Child Health Programs to: (1) effectively implement Title V of the Social Security Act; (2) coordinate with other related Federal programs; and (3) develop creative approaches for utilizing other such programs to meet the needs of mothers, children, adolescents, children with special health care needs, and families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196897.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Coordination of Health Care, Data Collection, Information Dissemination, Medicaid, PL 99-457, Social Security Act, Title V, State MCH directors, WIC Program

Harrison P. n.d.. Comprehensive Health Services System for Youth Offenders: [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 34 pp.

Annotation: This 3-year demonstration project sought to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of health services for adolescents detained or housed in institutional settings within the State Juvenile Service Agency (JSA). The overall purpose was to establish a link between the state Title V agency and the Juvenile Services Agency to assist the JSA to (1) determine the particular characteristics, health needs, and concerns of their adolescent population and (2) develop and manage appropriate comprehensive health systems as a model for the nation. The project designed a health information system (consisting of a personal computer using D-Base III plus software) to monitor the health status of the population and a training handbook for Juvenile Justice personnel. Information obtained regarding health status of the population was used in designing training materials for juvenile justice staff. Further training needs were identified by conducting an in-depth needs assessment and analysis. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB91-242008.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Adolescents, Continuing Education, High risk adolescents, Juvenile Delinquents, Nurses

Wittenmyer J. n.d.. Amelioration of Health Problems of Children with Parents with Mental Retardation: [Final report]. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Council on Developmental Disabilities, 51 pp.

Annotation: This project attempted to improve the health status of children in families in which one or both parents have mental retardation by reducing the risks associated with lack of immunization, poor nutrition, undiagnosed medical or developmental problems, injuries, and inadequate early stimulation. Efforts included both direct services (such as immunization, screening, and home care programs) and a consultation and technical assistance program aimed at improving the accessibility of the service delivery system for these children. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-201051.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Barriers to Health Care, Health Education, High risk children, High risk groups: Families, Mental Retardation, Parents, Parents with disabilities, Preventive Health Care, Primary Care

Force J. n.d.. Project Copernicus [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 15 pp.

Annotation: Project Copernicus, a dual-State initiative for Maryland and Virginia, developed, demonstrated, and evaluated training programs in family-centered service coordination with target groups of professional service providers and parents in urban, rural, and suburban areas of Maryland and Virginia. Project Copernicus demonstrated how to provide family-centered care for families with children with special health needs by assisting both parents and professional service providers to develop and use family-centered service coordination activities (case management). [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121859.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, CSHCN, Case Management, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Coordination of Health Care, Disabled, Education of Health Professionals, Families, Family-Centered Health Care, Fragmentation of Services, Parent Education, Parents, programs

Williams S. n.d.. Improving Community-Based Services for Special Needs Children and Their Families in Rural Utah [Final report]. Salt Lake City, UT: Utah Department of Health, 19 pp. pp.

Annotation: The goal of the project was to improve the functioning of special needs children and their families by providing locally based clinic and care coordination services in a rural area in Utah. The program objectives were to: (1) Involve parents of special needs children in developing a service plan for their child, (2) improve the implementation of service plans for rural special needs children, (3) improve coordination of services to rural special needs children, and (4) improve adequacy of services to these children. While maintaining current multidisciplinary clinic services, Children's Special Health Services worked through the local health department to place a nurse coordinator, secretary, social worker, and trained parent advocates in the local community. This team built upon existing local systems to improve the functional outcomes of the children. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121834.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Advocacy, Children with Special Health care Needs, Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities, Community Based Health Services, Parents, Rural Population, Service Coordination

Johnson C. n.d.. Making It Work for Children with Special Needs: The Family, the Community, the State [Final report]. Morgantown, WV: W. G. Klingberg Center for Child Development, 17 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to improve the overall system of health care delivery for West Virginia children with special health needs. Specific goals were to: (1) Provide individualized family empowerment training with specific emphasis on skills in case management; (2) strengthen the Handicapped Children's Services system of case management; (3) provide coordinated, comprehensive medical and educational evaluations for children with special health needs; (4) establish a movement recognizing parents as equal partners within the professional team; (5) enhance networking through a parent-provider interdisciplinary, interagency conference; (6) identify a primary medical home for every child with special health needs; (7) emphasize the role of the primary care physician as a member of the community team; (8) assure continuation of the project beyond the funding period; and (9) expand services to all children with special health needs in West Virginia. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121867.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Case Management, Children with Special Health care Needs, Families, Family Professional Collaboration, Interagency Cooperation, Medical Home, PL 99-457, Parent Professional Communication, Parents, Primary Care, Service Coordination

Danielson C. n.d.. Healthy Foundations [Final report]. Des Moines, IA: Iowa Department of Public Health, 51 pp.

Annotation: The project's goals were to: (1) Develop and implement structures and processes in defined community areas to plan and implement a family-centered, community-based health care delivery system for children; (2) develop data system capacity and function statewide to ensure family-centered, community-based primary care services for children; and (3) share experiences in family-centered, community-based system change in the area of primary health care for children with other State, regional, and national maternal and child health providers. At the State level, strategies were directed toward developing a system of children's primary health care delivery that was family centered and community based. At the local level, child health steering committees in established projects were to continue to plan and implement child health system changes in their service areas. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Child Mortality, Community Based Health Services, Databases, Family Centered Health Care, Information Systems, Primary Care, Standards of Care, State Programs

Langley M. n.d.. Continuum's Minority Connection Project [Final report]. Atlanta, GA: CONTINUUM Alliance for Healthy Mothers and Children, 32 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to reduce postneonatal mortality rates associated with inadequate parenting skills and poor utilization of prenatal and child health care services. Activities included establishment of a resource mothers program in which church women were trained to assist pregnant women in negotiating the health care and social services systems, and implementation of a teen peer counselor program. The project also established self-sustaining local coalitions to monitor and address problems that contribute to poor pregnancy outcomes. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196889.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Adolescents, Blacks, Clergy, Community-Based Health Services, High risk groups, High risk pregnancy, Infant Mortality, Low income groups, Postneonatal Mortality, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Religious organizations, Rural Populations

Poland M. n.d.. Increasing Access to Prenatal Care Through Problem Identification and Program Evaluation [Final report]. Detroit, MI: Wayne State University, 20 pp.

Annotation: This project addressed high infant mortality rates in Detroit and Wayne County as the general area of concern. The problems of high infant mortality rates and access to prenatal care were addressed over 3 years through a program of technical assistance to the Detroit/Wayne County Infant Health Promotion Coalition. The coalition, comprised of 36 public and private agencies, was established to address the high infant mortality rate through identification of contributing factors and development of programs to reduce these factors. Process objectives included: (1) identifing barriers to prenatal care through a review of relevant literature; (2) focus group discussions with health professionals and clients; (3) development of surveys of prenatal patients and new mothers with review of their medical charts; and (4) provide technical assistance in evaluating ongoing and proposed outreach efforts. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196863.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Infant Mortality, Low Birthweight, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care

Johnson J. n.d.. Parent-Pediatric Partnerships: Strengthening Families to Make the Vulnerable Invincible [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Department of Health, 16 pp.

Annotation: This project was a partnership between families and their medical home to develop a demonstration model for care coordination for environmentally at-risk infants and toddlers in low-income culturally diverse urban and rural settings. The families were being served as part of the eligible population under P.L. 99–457, with an individualized family support plan (IFSP) developed for each family. The target population included many families of different ethnic origins. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133969.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Children with Special Health care Needs, Cultural Diversity, Families, Family Centered Health Care, Family Support Programs, Hawaiians, Health Promotion, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Low Income Population, PL 99-457, Parents, Preschool Children, Primary Care, Rural Population, Service Coordination, Urban Population

American Academy of Pediatrics and Dartmouth Institute of Health Policy and Clinical Practice. n.d.. AAP Child Health Mapping Project. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource provides a geographic representation of child health in the United States. Contents include national and state-specific data on pediatric health care delivery at the Primary Care Service Area level. A range of maps is available including the number of children under age 18 per pediatrician, the number of children in linguistically-isolated households, median household income, the number of pediatric residents and fellows, and estimated vaccine coverage rates. An interactive mapping tool is available to members of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Data sources, Geographic regions, Health care disparities, Immunization, Integrated information systems, Interactive media, Language barriers, Low income groups, Patient care planning, Pediatricians, Statewide planning, Work force

National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health. n.d.. State offices of rural health. [Sterling Heights, MI]: National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet explains what a state office of rural health (SORH) is, goals of a SORH, and why SORHs are important. Topics include how SORHs support and build local capacity and draw attention to the challenges and successes in rural health care and how they support coordination and information sharing on rural health issues within state health agencies.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Health services delivery, Information dissemination, Public health infrastructure, Role, Rural health, Rural population, Service coordination, State health agencies, State programs, Technical assistance

Academy of General Dentistry. n.d.. A state advocacy toolkit. Chicago, IL: Academy of General Dentistry, 6 pp.

Annotation: This document for oral health professionals provides information and resources about advocating for oral health and oral health care access in states. Topics include becoming aware, being educated, and informed; building grassroots support; building coalitions; reaching out to legislators; testifying before state boards or legislatures; and attending or hosting town hall meetings and fundraisers. A link to additional resources for facilitating advocacy in government, public, and professional relations is also provided.

Contact: Academy of General Dentistry, 560 W. Lake Street, Sixth Floor, Chicago, IL 60661-6600, Telephone: (888) 243-3368 Fax: (312) 335-3443 Web Site: http://www.agd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Advocacy, Coalitions, Community action, Fundraising, Legislation, Oral health, Policy development, Public awareness campaigns, Statewide planning

n.d.. Tips for successfully incorporating Medicaid patients into a dental office. no place: no publisher, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document provides tips for accepting people who are enrolled in Medicaid into a dental office. The document offers suggestions for how to make adjustments to offset Medicaid’s reimbursement rates, which are lower than other insurance providers’. The document is divided into four sections: (1) benefits of taking Medicaid, (2) scheduling, (3) staffing, and (4) providing care for young children. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: , Access to health care, Low income groups, Medicaid, Oral health, Young children

Children's Dental Services. n.d.. Dental therapy: How mid-level providers can increase access to care, lower costs, and help increase the effectiveness of community clinics. Minneapolis, MN: Children's Dental Services, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information about how using dental therapists instead of dentists to perform some oral health services can increase access to care, lower costs, and help increase the effectiveness of community clinics in Minnesota. The document explains why Minnesota needs mid-level oral health professionals, lists universities in the state that offer dental therapy and advanced dental therapy degrees, and provides specifics showing how using dental therapists can decrease per-patient costs and increase the number of patients served. [Partially funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Children's Dental Services, 636 Broadway Street, N.E., Minneapolis, MN 55413, Telephone: (612) 746-1530 Secondary Telephone: (866) 543-6009 Fax: (612) 746-1531 Web Site: http://childrensdentalservices.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Access to health care, Health care costs, Minnesota, Oral health, State programs

Texas Health and Human Services, Texas Health Steps. n.d.. Oral health and dental services for pregnant women. [Austin, TX:} Texas Health and Human Services, Texas Health Steps,

Annotation: This training is designed to help health workers teach pregnant women about the importance of oral health and the safety of receiving oral health care during pregnancy and to provide pregnant women with resources to enable them find affordable local oral health care. For each topic, suggestions about how to communicate effectively with pregnant women, case examples, and other relevant information are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Texas Department of State Health Services, 1100 West 49th Street, Austin, TX 78756, Telephone: (512) 458-7111 Secondary Telephone: (512) 458-7708 Fax: (512) 458-7750 Web Site: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us Available from the website.

Keywords: , Access to health care, Training materials, Communication, Oral health, Pregnant women

Wisconsin Oral Health Coalition. 2019. Check-up on oral health: A call to action. Milwaukee, WI: Children's Health Alliance of Wisconsin, Wisconsin Oral Health Coalition, 5 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information about the importance of oral health throughout the lifespan, the economic costs of oral disease and oral health disparities, and efforts to improve access to preventive oral health services in Michigan. Topics include gains made in increasing access statewide through the expansion of Healthy Kids Dental, a public-private partnership between the Michigan Department of Community Health and Delta Dental; maintenance of dental benefits for adults enrolled in Medicaid; community water fluoridation; and dental sealants.

Contact: Children's Health Alliance of Wisconsin, 620 South 76th Street, Suite 120, Milwaukee, WI 53214, Telephone: (414) 292-4000 Secondary Telephone: (414) 337-4561 Fax: (414) 231-4972 Web Site: http://www.chawisconsin.org/oral-health.php?pg=13 Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adults, Barriers, Children, Coalitions, Community action, Dental sealants, Fluorides, Health care disparities, Infants, Life course, Medicaid, Michigan, Older adults, Oral health, Policy development, Preventive health services, Public private partnerships, State programs, Statewide planning, Water, Wisconsin

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.