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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (122 total).

Center for Mental Health in Schools. n.d.. A sampling of outcome findings from interventions relevant to addressing barriers to learning. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, ca. 150 pp. (Technical assistance sampler)

Annotation: The purpose of this report is to provide technical assistance to individuals working to improve student performance in American public schools. Examples of specific techniques that address barriers to student learning and data to support these techniques are highlighted within this document. Areas covered include (1) enhancing classroom-based efforts to enable learning, (2) providing student and family assistance, (3) responding to and preventing crises, (4) supporting transitions, (5) increasing home involvement in schooling, and (6) outreach for greater community involvement and support. [Support in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Barriers, Community participation, Knowledge level, Learning, Mental health, Parent participation

Websters International. n.d.. The Bowdoin Method of parenting education. Brentwood, TN: Websters International, 14 pp., 1 videotape.

Annotation: This packet includes a brochure and informational videotape describing the Bowdoin Method of Parent Education, an education program for high-risk children. The Bowdoin Method contains three separate curricula that teach parents of children from birth through age 13 the attitudes and skills they need to prepare their children for school and life. The materials are geared toward parents with low literacy levels. Descriptions of packages of materials available for purchase, as well as order forms, are included. The packages include parenting books, games, teachers' manuals, parent prizes, posters, pre- and posttest, and videotapes. The materials are available in English and Spanish.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Audiovisual materials, Children, High risk children, Infants, Life skills, Low literacy materials, Parent education programs, Parenting skills, Parents, School readiness, Spanish language materials

American Lung Association. n.d.. Model policy for school districts: Stock bronchodilators. Washington, DC: American Lung Association, 5 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to help school districts improve the health and academic outcomes of students with asthma. The document provides a framework for developing policies allowing use of stock bronchodilators in schools. Contents include information about implementing a model policy and creating a protocols and procedures document. A model policy template with definitions and conditions for administering, administering and storing, and obtaining stock bronchodilators is also included.

Contact: American Lung Association, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 785-3355 Secondary Telephone: (800) 548-8252 Fax: (202) 452-1805 E-mail: info@lungusa.org Web Site: http://www.lungusa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Asthma, Child health, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Disease management, Models, Policy development, School age children, School districts, School nurses, Schools, Self care

Michael SL, Zavacky F. 2017. Strategies for recess in schools. Reston, VA: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document describes strategies for planning and providing recess in schools to help increase participation in physical activity and improve academic achievement. Contents include information about the definition and benefits of recess and national guidance and considerations for recess in schools. Topics include making leadership decisions, communicating and enforcing behavior and safety expectations, creating an environment supportive of physical activity during recess, engaging the school community to support recess, gathering information on recess, and taking action. Additional planning resources, case studies, a video, and infographics are also available.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Child safety, Community action, Decision making, Leadership, Multimedia, Physical activity, Policy development, Program planning, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Mann R, Mays A. 2017. State ESSA plans to support student health and wellness: A framework for action (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Healthy Schools Campaign, 29 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance on developing state plans for implementing the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) in ways that support student health and wellness. Topics include engaging stakeholders in a way that ensures an effective ESSA state plan is developed and implemented; implementing a state accountability system and creating a school report card that supports the health and learning connection; integrating health and wellness into standards, assessments, and a well-rounded education; integrating student learning through staff wellness and professional development; supporting the transition from early childhood programs to elementary school; transferring funding to strengthen ESSA health and wellness programming; the Student Support and Academic Enrichment grant; and looking ahead. For each topic, the document outlines why it's important, what the law says, action steps, and resources. An overview of ESSA is included.

Contact: Healthy Schools Campaign, 175 N. Franklin, Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-1810 Fax: (312) 419-1806 Web Site: http://www.healthyschoolscampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Accountability, Adolescent health, Case studies, Child health, Federal initiatives, Financing, Grants, Learning, Needs Assessment, Organizational change, Policy development, School age children, School health programs, Schools, Service integration, Standards, Statewide planning, Students, Transitions

Michael SL, Zavacky F. 2017. Recess planning in schools: A guide to putting strategies for recess into practice. Reston, VA: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 26 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to help schools develop a school recess plan that can be shared with staff, students, and parents. Contents include questions that schools can consider to help them choose strategies to implement or to help them evaluate their current efforts, templates that schools can use to record information about the strategies they choose for their school recess plans, and key resources that align with the recommended recess strategies and provide additional information and examples of how to address these strategies. A companion document, Strategies for Recess in Schools, and additional planning resources; case studies; a video; and infographics are also available.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Child safety, Community action, Decision making, Evaluation, Leadership, Multimedia, Physical activity, Planning, Policy development, Resources for professionals, School age children, School health, Schools, Students

Gracy D, Fabian A, Roncaglione V, Savage K, Redlener I. 2017. Health barriers to learning: The prevalence and educational consequences in disadvantaged children–A review of the literature. New York, NY: Children's Health Fund, 93 pp.

Annotation: This report offers recommendations to strengthen the safety net for children. It describes health barriers to learning, including oral pain and untreated dental caries, and the evidence base for the impact of these barriers on academic success. For each barrier, the report describes the prevalence; the extent of unmet need for services to identify, manage, and treat the barrier; the impact of the barrier on learning; and key points.

Contact: Children's Health Fund, 215 West 125th Street, Suite 301 , New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (212) 535-9400 Web Site: http://www.childrenshealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, Barriers, Child health, Disease management, Learning, Literature reviews, Needs assessment, Prevalence, School readiness, Service integration

Takanishi R, Le Menestrel S, eds; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Committee on Fostering School Success for English Learners: Toward New Directions in Policy, Practice, and Research. 2017. Promoting the educational success of children and youth learning English: Promising Futures. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 430 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses the assets that dual language learners (DLLs) and English learners (ELs) bring to their education and the factors that support or may impede their educational success. The report also provides recommendations for policy, practice, and research and data collection focused on addressing the challenges in caring for and educating DLLs/ELs from birth to grade 12. Topics include the policy context, demography of the EL population, capacities and influences on language development, promising and effective practices and programs, the development of English language proficiency, DLLs/Els with disabilities, and building the workforce to educate ELs.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-45537-4.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child care, Children, Data collection, Education, Home visiting, Infants, Language development, Learning, Policy development, Research, School readiness, Work force

Schubel J. 2017. Medicaid helps schools help children. Washington, DC: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines the role of Medicaid in funding critical health-related services for students with disabilities. Topics include providing reimbursement for health care services that are necessary for students with disabilities to succeed in school and ensuring schools' compliance with Individuals with Disabilities Education Act requirements, helping students to stay healthy and succeed academically, and connecting students to coverage. The brief also describes the long-term benefits of Medicaid for eligible children and the potential impact of spending reductions on students, local communities, and state budgets. The appendix contains a table on state and federal Medicaid spending in schools.

Contact: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 820 First Street N.E., Suite 510, Washington, DC 20002, Telephone: (202) 408-1080 Fax: (202) 408-1056 E-mail: center@cbpp.org Web Site: http://www.cbpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Eligibility, Enrollment, Medicaid, Reimbursement, Role, School health services, Schools, Special health care needs, State programs, Students

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2017. Managing chronic health conditions in schools: The role of the school nurse. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the role of school nurses in improving student academic achievement and decreasing absenteeism by helping students with chronic health conditions manage their condition. Topics include providing direct care such as giving children medications, providing case management, and advocating for students and their families to help them get the resources and support they need.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/NCCDPHP/dph Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Case management, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Disease management, Elementary schools, Families, Family support services, Health services delivery, Homeless persons, Program coordination, Role, School age children, School nurses, Students

Oakes J, Maier A, Daniel J. 2017. Community schools: An evidence-based strategy for equitable school improvement. Boulder, CO: National Education Policy Center and Palo Alto, CA: Learning Policy Institute, 26 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines the research on community schools, with two primary emphases. First, it explores whether the 2015 federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) opens the possibility of investing in well-designed community schools to meet the educational needs of low-achieving students in high-poverty schools. And second, it provides support to school, district, and state leaders as they consider, propose, or implement a community school intervention in schools targeted for comprehensive support. An online research compendium summarizing the referenced studies referenced is also available.

Contact: Learning Policy Institute, 1530 Page Mill Road, Suite 200, Palo Alto, CA 94303, Telephone: (650) 332-9797 Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Barriers, Collaboration, Community based services, Community development, Costs, Federal legislation, Intervention, Leadership, Policy analysis, Poverty, Program evaluation, Program improvement, Public policy, Public private partnerships, Research, Schools, Service integration, Students, Vulnerability

McLanahan S, Currie JM, Haskins R, Kearney M, Rouse CE, Sawhill I. 2017. Social and emotional learning. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 2 items. (The future of children; vol. 27, no. 1, Spring 2017)

Annotation: This issue of Future of Children examines the state of the science on social and emotional learning (SEL) intervention and assessment, and related policy issues in education. The eight articles describe how to support SEL in schools and explore how SEL in schools might impact policy questions in education. Topics include SEL as a public health approach to education; SEL interventions in early childhood; promoting social and emotional competencies in elementary school; SEL programs for adolescents; SEL-focused after-school programs; SEL and equity in school discipline; SEL and teachers; and social-emotional assessment, performance, and standards.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescents, After school programs, Assessment, Child development, Competency based education, Discipline, Elementary schools, Emotional development, Intervention, Learning, Policy analysis, Psychosocial development, Standards, Teaching, Young children

National Coordinating Committee on School Health and Safety. 2016. NCCSHS 19th annual meeting: The Every Student Succeeds Act–What does it mean for student achievement, health and safety? [participant folder]. [no place]: National Coordinating Committee on School Health and Safety, 1 v.

Annotation: This binder contains materials from a meeting of federal agency and national nongovernmental organization staff held on May 20, 2015, in Rockville, Maryland, to discuss the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and what it means for student achievement, health, and safety. Contents include the agenda, speaker biographies, a list of meeting participants, and a list of organizations participating in National Coordinating Committee on School Health and Safety (NCCSHS); handouts; small group discussion materials; and background materials. Topics include ESSA provisions intended to support safe and healthy students and how other federal agency program align with those provisions, the ESSA appropriations process including the development of regulations and provision of technical assistance to states for implementing the regulations, and high impact opportunities for connecting health and education. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Single photocopies available at no charge.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Collaboration, Community participation, Federal initiatives, Health promotion, Meetings, Nutrition, Physical education, Program coordination, Public policy, Public private partnerships, Relationships, School age children, School health education, School health programs, School health services, School safety

Cook-Harvey CM, Darling-Hammond L, Lam L, Mercer C, Roc M. 2016. Equity and ESSA: Leveraging educational opportunity through the Every Student Succeeds Act. Palo Alto, CA: Learning Policy Institute, 26 pp.

Annotation: This report for educators, researchers, policy influencers, and advocates examines provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) that can be used to advance equity and excellence in education for all students. The report reviews the provisions in the following four areas: higher-order skills for all students, multiple measures to assess school performance and progress, resource equity, and equity strategies and evidence-based interventions. Topics include standards and learning goals, assessments, opportunities to learn, school climate and student inclusion, equitable access to effective teaching, reporting school expenditures and tracking inequities, state plans' focus on equity, incentives for equitable funding approaches, how equity policy can leverage successes for new immigrant students, school improvement funding, early childhood education, community schools, and integration and school diversity.

Contact: Learning Policy Institute, 1530 Page Mill Road, Suite 200, Palo Alto, CA 94303, Telephone: (650) 332-9797 Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Barriers, Educational change, Equal opportunities, Intervention, Legislation, Low income groups, Measures, Public education, Resource allocation, Students, Systems development, Thinking, Underserved communities, Vulnerability

Lopez ME, Caspe M, McWilliams L. 2016. Public libraries: A vital space for family engagement. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Family Research Project™, 19 pp.

Annotation: This report calls for libraries to join together with schools and community organizations to establish a system of family engagement that extends throughout a child’s life, supports children and families, and prepares children for success. The report defines family engagement and explains why families matter for children's healthy development and positive feelings toward learning, why libraries matter for family engagement, and ways libraries can encourage family engagement. Examples are included.

Contact: Global Family Research Project™, Third Sector New England, 89 South Street, Boston, MA 02111, E-mail: info@GlobalFRP.org Web Site: http://www.GlobalFRP.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child development, Community action, Families, Learning, Literacy, Participation, Public libraries, Systems development

Haskins R, Brooks-Gunn J. 2016. Trouble in the land of early childhood education? . Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 7 pp. (Policy brief)

Annotation: This brief examines empirical results from evaluations of early childhood education programs, including state pre-K programs. Topics include public support for pre-K; unanswered questions; and efforts to stimulate public discussion of the evidence for pre-K programs and the cumulative experiences that support long-term educational success, synthesize what is known about long-term outcomes of large-scale pre-K programs, and propose an agenda of longitudinal research on the major questions that bear on the future of pre-K education. The brief is a companion piece to Starting Early: Education from Prekindergarten to Third Grade.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Early childhood education, Outcome and process assessment, Policy analysis, Policy development, Program evaluation, Public policy, Research, School readiness, State programs

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2015–. Parent engagement. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to assist parents and school staff in working together to support and improve the learning, development, and health of children and adolescents. Contents include fact sheets for school districts and school administrators, teachers and other school staff, and parents and families. A strategy guide for state and local education agencies on selecting and implementing parent engagement strategies specific to HIV/STD prevention and a facilitator's guide for staff development are also included.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Child development, Child health, Family support, Health behavior, Learning, Parents, Protective factors, School age children, School districts, School personnel, Schools, Social support, Students, Teachers

Chester A, Alker J. 2015. Medicaid at 50: A look at the long-term benefits of childhood Medicaid. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Health Policy Institute, Center for Children and Families, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report looks at the body of research that shows how Medicaid coverage for children has resulted in better health, lower rates of mortality, and better educational and economic outcomes, as well as a significant return on investment for government.

Contact: Georgetown University Health Policy Institute, Center for Children and Families, 3300 Whitehaven Street, N.W., Suite 5000, Box 571444, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-0880 Fax: (202) 687-3110 E-mail: childhealth@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://ccf.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Costs, Economic factors, Health status, Medicaid, Outcome and process assessment

Center for Health and Health Care in Schools. 2015. Partner. Build. Grow. An action guide for sustaining child development and prevention approaches. Washington, DC: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, multiple items.

Annotation: This guide provides school administrators, program directors, civic leaders, and other stakeholders with tools to improve the sustainability of school-based approaches that promote students’ cognitive, social, and emotional health and educational success. Contents include practical steps for integrating evidence-based student supports into state and local systems. The guide breaks down policy advocacy steps into four interconnected prongs (mapping assets, building an action team, connecting with the policy environment, and communications) for mobilizing key allies, developing an action plan based on existing resources, accessing viable financing and regulatory strategies, and exploring communications strategies.

Contact: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, 2175 K Street, N.W., Suite 200, Room 213, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 994-4895 E-mail: chhcs@gwu.edu Web Site: http://www.healthinschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Advocacy, Cognitive development, Communications, Communities, Community action, Financing, Mental health, Policy development, Regulations, School health, Schools, Service integration, Students, Sustainability

National Coordinating Committee on School Health and Safety. 2015. NCCSHS 18th annual meeting: Reducing chronic absenteeism–Promoting school attendance [participant folder]. [no place]: National Coordinating Committee on School Health and Safety, 1 v.

Annotation: This binder contains materials from a meeting of federal agency and national nongovernmental organization staff to discuss ways to reduce student absenteeism and promote school attendance held on May 20, 2015, in Rockville, Maryland. Contents include the agenda, speaker biographies, a list of meeting participants, and a list of organizations participating in National Coordinating Committee on School Health and Safety (NCCSHS); handouts; small group discussion materials; and background materials. Topics include the role of multiple sectors in promoting school attendance and opportunities for improved collaboration across sectors, how state and local programs and practices address school attendance, strategies to further information exchange and networking, and ideas for promoting the work of NCCSHS and strengthening relationships. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Single photocopies available at no charge.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Community participation, Federal initiatives, Health promotion, Meetings, Nutrition, Physical education, Program coordination, Public policy, Public private partnerships, Relationships, School age children, School health education, School health programs, School health services, School safety

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.