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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Disasters and Terrorism Bibliography

Disasters and Terrorism

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 33 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published primarily in the last ten years.  

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 33 records.

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d.. Family readiness kit: Preparing to handle disasters. (2nd ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 35 pp.

Annotation: This kit is designed for parents to use at home to help prepare for most kinds of disasters. It consists of an overview booklet, a "4 steps to safety readiness" guide, a child identification card, a list for recording local emergency phone numbers, and fact sheets on earthquake, flood, hurricane, terrorism, tornado, tsunami, and winter storms.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Disaster planning

Save the Children. 2014. A national report card on protecting children during disasters. Westport, CT: Save the Children, 1 v.

Annotation: This report evaluates basic state emergency preparedness plans for children in each state and the District of Columbia, and highlights a critical standard that every state should have in place to address the most vulnerable children in child care. Standards discussed include an evacuation plan for children in child care, plans for reuniting children with their families after a disaster, a plan for children with disabilities and those with access and functional needs, and a multi-hazard plan for K-12 schools. The report provides state-by-state data with successful examples as well as a description of the study methodology.

Contact: Save the Children, 501 Kings Highway East, Fairfield, CT 06825, Telephone: (203) 221-4000 Web Site: http://www.savethechildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Children, Children with special health care needs, Disaster planning, Emergencies, Infants, State surveys, Young children

Abramson D, Brooks K, Peek L. 2013. The science and practice of resilience interventions for children exposed to disasters. Washington, DC: National Academies, Institute of Medicine, 16 pp.

Annotation: This white paper considers the current science and practice of resilience interventions for children and adolescents who are susceptible to disasters or who have been exposed to disasters. The paper reviews ways ithat resilience research has influenced resilience interventions, considers specific illustrations of these resilience practices, and examines the evidentiary base for these activities. The paper places these disaster-related resilience interventions within a public health framework of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention and explores the challenges of developing evidence-based resilience practices within the context of disasters.

Contact: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-2352 Fax: (202) 334-1412 E-mail: HMD-NASEM@nas.edu Web Site: https://www.nationalacademies.org/hmd Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Disaster planning, Disasters, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Intervention, Prevention, Public health, Research, Resilience

Etzel RA, Balk SJ,, eds. and American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Environmental Health. 2012. Pediatric environmental health (3rd ed.). [Elk Grove, IL]: American Academy of Pediatrics, 934 pp.

Annotation: This book, designed to be used by practicing pediatricians, offers information on the role of the environment in the illnesses of childhood and adolescence. The book is organized into five sections. Section 1 offers background information including developmental toxicity, breastfeeding, how to take an environmental history, and how to do a home inventory of environmental hazards. Sections 2 and 3 focus on chemical and physical hazards and on specific environments such as child care settings, preconceptual and prenatal exposures, schools, waste sites, and workplaces. Section 4 addresses a variety of environmental situations including arts and crafts, asthma, cancer, chemical-biological terrorism, environmental disparities, multiple chemical sensitivities, antibiotics in animal agriculture, and environmental threats in developing countries. Section 5 provides information on communicating about environmental hazards. Boxes, figures, and tables present statistical and other information throughout the book. Also included are six appendices, including the American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP's) policy statements and technical reports, resources for environmental health, curricula for environmental education in schools, chairs of the AAP committee on environmental health, AAP patient education materials, and more. The book concludes with an index.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Document Number: ISBN 9781581106534.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Asthma, Chemicals, Child health, Environment, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Environmental influences, Environmental pollution, Hazards, Pediatricians, Reference materials

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2012. Tips for talking with and helping children and youth cope after a disaster or traumatic event: A guide for parents, caregivers, and teachers. [Rockville, MD]: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 4 pp.

Annotation: This pamphlet provides tips for parents and teachers on how to talk to children and adolescents after traumatic events. Information about how children and adolescents may react and behave is provided for preschool-age children, children ages 5-11, and adolescents ages 12-14. Ideas about how to help, what to say and do, and what to do when talking isn't enough are provided.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SMA12-4732.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Child behavior, Children, Communication, Disasters, Emotional trauma, Emotions

American Public Health Association, Get Ready. [2011]. Are you ready? Get Ready tips for kids: How you can stay safe in an emergency. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association, 2 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet for children explains how to prepare for an emergency. It describes how to make an emergency supply kit and lists some of the important items that should be contained in it (for example, a radio, food, water, extra clothes, blankets, batteries, etc.). It also explains the importance of making a family plan in case family members are not in the same place at the time of the emergency. It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: American Public Health Association, 800 I Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001-3710, Telephone: (202) 777-2742 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 777-2534 E-mail: comments@apha.org Web Site: http://www.apha.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child safety, Disaster planning, Injury prevention, Materials for children, Public health, Spanish language materials

American Public Health Association, Get Ready. [2011]. Are you ready? Preparing for emergencies: Tips for pregnant women and new moms. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association, 2 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet for pregnant women and new mothers explains how to prepare for a natural disaster or other life-threatening emergency. It discusses the special needs of pregnant women and infants during a disaster and describes additional items that should be included in a household emergency stockpile kit related to pregnancy and newborn care. The tip sheet emphasizes the importance of having a plan in place and also reminds new and expecting mothers about the importance of breastfeeding. It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: American Public Health Association, 800 I Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001-3710, Telephone: (202) 777-2742 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 777-2534 E-mail: comments@apha.org Web Site: http://www.apha.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Disaster planning, Injury prevention, Mothers, Newborn infants, Pregnant women, Public health, Safety, Spanish language materials

American Public Health Association, Get Ready. [2011]. Are you ready? Preparing your child for emergencies. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association, 2 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet for parents explains how to talk with children about the types of disasters that can take place and why preparing ahead of time is important. It offers suggestions to help parents discuss emergency situations with their children and explains how the whole family can participate in emergency preparedness. It discusses the importance of practicing the emergency plan, becoming familiar with the school's plan, designating an emergency contact person, and lending a hand to others in need. It is available in Spanish and English.

Contact: American Public Health Association, 800 I Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001-3710, Telephone: (202) 777-2742 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 777-2534 E-mail: comments@apha.org Web Site: http://www.apha.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child safety, Communication, Consumer education materials, Disaster planning, Families, Injury prevention, Public health, Spanish language materials

National Education Association Health Information Network. 2011. School crisis guide: Help and healing in a time of crisis. Washington, DC: National Education Association Health Information Network, 46 pp.

Annotation: This step-by-step guide provides schools and school districts a framework for planning and responding before, during, and after a crisis such as an earthquake or other natural disaster. Intended to help principals, school administrators, union leaders, and school personnel help keep schools safe by (1) creating an emergency preparedness and crisis response plan; (2) responding effectively and appropriately during a disaster; and (3) handling the crisis after the disaster has occurred. It offers guidelines on responding to long-term mental health care needs, handling donations, communications and media strategies, and evaluating the response. The guide also describes how crisis response teams organized by the National Education Association (NEA) can assist states in the aftermath of a traumatic event or emergency situation.

Contact: National Education Association Healthy Futures, 1201 16th Street, N.W., Suite 216, Washington, DC 20036-3290, Telephone: (202) 822-7570 Fax: (202) 822-7775 E-mail: info@neahealthyfutures.org Web Site: http://www.neahhealthyfutures.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Crisis, Disaster planning, Emergencies, School linked programs, School safety

Hepburn KS. [2010]. Recognizing and addressing trauma in infants, young children, and their families. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation, (Tutorial 6)

Annotation: This online tutorial is designed to to help early childhood mental health consultants as well as Head Start and Early Head Start staff understand what is meant by trauma, recognize the developmental context of trauma in early childhood, and extend their own knowledge for intervention through consultation. The tutorial includes a pretest and five modules: (1) trauma and types of trauma; (2) the impact of trauma on infants, toddlers, and young children; (3) trauma signs and symptoms in infants, toddlers, and young children; (4) the role of the consultant and consultation; and (5) further learning and exploration (a resource compendium). It also includes a list of take home messages, a post test, and links to additional information sources.

Contact: Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, E-mail: ecmhc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.ecmhc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child mental health, Consultants, Consultation, Early Head Start, Early intervention, Head Start, Injury prevention, Prevention programs, Professional education, Young children

National Child Traumatic Stress Network. 2010. Caring for children who have experienced trauma: A workshop for resource parents. [Durham, NC]: National Child Traumatic Stress Network,

Annotation: This PowerPoint-based training curriculum, which is designed to be taught by a mental health professional along with foster parents as co-facilitators, includes nine case studies of representative foster children ages 8 months to 15 years, as well as of secondary traumatic stress in parents. The goal of the curriculum is to help parents understand the link between trauma and their children's often baffling behavior, feelings, and attitudes and to provide parents with tools to help children move forward, to recognize and reduce the impact of their children's traumas on themselves, and to seek useful support from others. It includes a facilitator's guide, a participant's guide, and a slide kit.

Contact: National Child Traumatic Stress Network, National Resource Center for Child Traumatic Stress, , 905 West Main Street, Suite 25B , Durham, NC 27701, Telephone: (919) 682-1552 Secondary Telephone: (310) 235-2633 Fax: (919) 667-9578 E-mail: nationalresourcecenter@duke.edu Web Site: http://www.nctsnet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Case studies, Child abuse, Child attitudes, Child behavior, Child neglect, Curricula, Families, Family support, Foster children, Foster parents, Infant behavior, Mental health, Parent support services, Parenting skills, Training, Trauma

National Commission on Children and Disasters. 2010. 2010 report to the President and Congress. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 185 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study that examined and assessed the needs of infants, children, and adolescents from birth through age 18 in relation to the preparation for, response to, and recovery from all hazards, including major disasters and emergencies, by building upon the evaluations of other entities and reviewing their findings, conclusions, and recommendations. The report includes findings, conclusions, and recommendations on the following topics: physical health, mental health, and trauma; child care; child welfare; elementary and secondary education; sheltering, temporary housing, and affordable housing; transportation; juvenile justice; evacuation; and relevant activities in emergency management.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ pub. no. 10-M037; ISBN 978-1-58763-401-7.

Keywords: Adolescent heath, Adolescents, Child care, Child health, Child welfare, Children, Costs, Disaster planning, Education, Emergencies, Housing, Infant health, Infants, Juvenile justice, Mental health, Transportation, Trauma

National Commission on Children and Disasters. 2010. 2010 report to the President and Congress. Washington, DC: National Commission on Children and Disasters, 185 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a study that assessed the needs of infants, children, and adolescents in relation to preparation for, response to, and recovery from all hazards, including major disasters and emergencies. The report includes specific findings, conclusions, and recommendations relating to (1) child health, mental health, and trauma; (2) child care in all settings; (3) child welfare; (4) elementary and secondary education; (5) sheltering, temporary housing, and affordable housing; (6) transportation; (7) juvenile justice; (8) evacuation; and (9) relevant activities in emergency management. The report also provides specific recommendations on the need for planning and establishing a national resource center on children and disasters and discusses the coordination of resources and services, administrative actions, policies, regulations, and legislative changes.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child care, Child health, Costs, Disaster planning, Disasters, Elementary education, Emergencies, Housing, Infant health, Juvenile justice, Legislation, Mental health, Public policy, Research, Secondary education, Service coordination, Transportation, Trauma

Jaycox L, Langley A, Dean KL. 2009. Support for students exposed to trauma: The SSET program. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, ca. 200 pp.

Annotation: This book presents a program designed for use by school personnel to support students exposed to trauma. It consists of a series of ten lessons providing skill building techniques geared toward changing maladaptive thoughts, promoting positive behaviors, and increasing levels of peer and parent support for affected students. It contains a group leader training manual that defines program concepts, provides information on selecting student participants, scheduling lessons, assuring confidentiality, coordinating with clinical backup, managing difficult situations and issues, and conducting group meetings. A lesson plans and worksheets and materials sections supplies preparation material and plans as well as homework assignments, worksheets, letters to parents, forms, and other program materials.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org $40.00, plus shipping and handling; download available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior modification, Curricula, Educational materials, Manuals, Mental health programs, Middle schools, Program descriptions, School age children, School linked programs, School personnel, Trauma, Violence

Rich J, Corbin T, Bloom S, Rich L, Evans S, and Wilson A. 2009. Healing the hurt: Trauma-informed approaches to the health of boys and young men of color. Los Angeles, CA: California Endowment, 83 pp.

Annotation: This report looks at the effects of trauma on the health of boys and young men of color (Hispanic and African American) over the course of their lifespan and explores ways in which poor health outcomes might be prevented or mitigated. Included are definitions of trauma and trauma theory; a review of the science related to trauma and brain development; a discussion of trauma as a social determinant; and possible applications of trauma knowledge to community prevention and system change efforts. Included is a detailed description of the Sanctuary Model -- an evidence-supported method for creating a culture in which healing from psychologically and socially traumatic experiences can be addressed. A list of selected references is included, along with an appendix of trauma experts in the state of California.

Contact: California Endowment, Greater Los Angeles Program Office, 1000 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012, Telephone: (800) 449-4149 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.calendow.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent males, Blacks, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Hispanic Americans, Human development, Life course, Male children, Mental health, Minority health, Prevention programs, Racial factors, Socioeconomic factors, Trauma, Young men

Cooper JL, Masi R, Dababnah S, Aratani Y, Knitzer, J. 2007. Strengthening policies to support children, youth, and families who experience trauma. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 97 pp. (Unclaimed children revisited, working paper no. 2)

Annotation: This report, the second of five special reports, is based on a forum convened by the National Center for Children in Poverty with support from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The forum brought together a cross-section of policymakers, researchers, community leaders, family members, youth, and practitioners in trauma-related areas. The aims were to explore (1) the current state of service delivery and supports for children, youth, and their families exposed to trauma and (2) ways to advance a more coherent trauma-informed policy agenda, particularly through mental health agencies. The report is organized into six sections. Section 1 sets the context, section 2 describes the policy response, section 3 defines the core components of trauma-informed practice, section 4 provides examples of efforts to promote trauma-informed practice in communities, section 5 sets forth recommendations, and section 6 includes case studies. The report also includes three appendices: (1) a list of meeting participants, (2) a list of case study respondents, and (3) two charts that list state-by-state information on trauma-informed services and infrastructure supports.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Children, Community programs, Families, Family support services, Health services delivery, Mental health, Mental health agencies, Public policy, Trauma, Youth

Save the Children, Domestic Emergencies Unit. 2007. The unique needs of children in emergencies: A guide for the inclusion of children in emergency operations plans. Westport, CT: Save the Children, Domestic Emergencies Unit, 32 pp.

Annotation: This guide was created to help local and state emergency managers and coordinators in their efforts to develop and maintain a supplemental document (in addition to the community's standard emergency operations plan) that addresses children's particular needs. The guide discusses why a special document for children is needed, the planning process in brief, and drafting the document. The guide include eight appendices: (1) a protocol to identify and protect displace children, (2) a child identification survey, (3) psychological effects of disasters on children, (4) special psychological needs of children following disasters, (5) disaster response information for school crisis teams, (6) hospital decontamination and the pediatric patient, (7) legal considerations for working with children in disasters, and (8) registry information from schools, child care centers, and other facilities that care for children.

Contact: Save the Children, 501 Kings Highway East, Fairfield, CT 06825, Telephone: (203) 221-4000 Web Site: http://www.savethechildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care centers, Children, Communities, Disaster planning, Disasters, Emergencies, Hospitals, Mental health, Schools

U.S. Department of Health and Human Resources, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs and Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. 2007. Public health emergency response: A guide for leaders and responders. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Resources, 120 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides background information to help leaders and first responders make informed decisions and make the best use of the resources available at a time of crisis. The guide addresses some of the public health issues facing leaders and responders. The guide is divided into self-contained sections that can be read in any order; each section begins with a list of highlights. Topics covered include (1) public health response, (2) key functions of federal government public health agencies in an emergency, (3) food security and food supply, (4) environmental safety and testing, (5) leading through communication, (6) legal and policy considerations, (7) taking care of yourself and each other, (8) conducting exercises for preparedness, and (9) post-event: leading the community toward recovery. A bibliography and an index are included. The guide includes six appendices: (1) resources list, (2) biological agents, (3) chemical agents, (4) radiation emergencies, (5) pandemic influenza, and (6) distaster supplies kit.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Communities, Disaster planning, Disasters, Emergencies, Food supply, Public health

New York Academy of Medicine. 2006-. Resource guide for public health preparedness. New York, NY: New York Academy of Medicine,

Annotation: This Web site includes information about public health preparedness. The site includes a searchable resource guide database with guidelines, fact sheets, and other tools; a current awareness update section that contains recent additions to the database; a list of other sources of information about distasters and medicine, and background information on the Resource Guide project. In 2010 the guide became hosted by the National Library of Medicine.

Contact: New York Academy of Medicine, 1216 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029, Telephone: (212) 822-7200 Fax: (212) 722-7650 Web Site: http://www.nyam.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Disaster planning, Disasters, Online databases, Public health, Resource materials, World WIde Web

Bravata DM, Wang E, Holty J, Lewis R, Wise PH, Nayak,S, Liu H, McDonald M, Owens DK. 2006. Pediatric anthrax: Implications for bioterrorism preparedness. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 34 pp. (Evidence report/technology assessment; no. 141)

Annotation: This report describes a literature search about children with anthrax (from 1900 to 2005) to describe their clinical course, treatment responses, and the predictors of disease progression and mortality, and to differentiate any requirements specific to children in the case of a terrorist attack utilizing anthrax. Chapters include an introduction to key research questions, methods used in the data collection and analysis, results of the various forms of anthrax, and a discussion section outlining limitations of the research and future research needs. References are also included. Appendices provide information on data abstracted, adult anthrax cases not included in this analysis, and a list of peer reviewers.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 06(07)-0056-1.

Keywords: Literature reviews, Children, Emergency medical services for children, Pediatric care, Research, Terrorism

Golden O. 2006. Young children after Katrina: A proposal to heal the damage and create opportunity in New Orleans. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report looks at the consequences of Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath for young children in New Orleans, particularly those who started out furthest behind. The report addresses questions about (1) what evidence suggests about effective large-scale interventions for young children that could successfully reverse the damage and fit into the uncertain timetable of families' return to New Orleans and (2) what specific plans for young children should be incorporated into the rebuilding of New Orleans. The report provides background, discusses the impact of the storm, and presents a framework for a response and a proposal for using Head Start and Early Head Start as a beginning point for responding to the needs of young children in New Orleans. Endnotes and references are included.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Disasters, Early Head Start, Early childhood development, Head Start, High risk children, High risk infants, Infants, Intervention, Low income groups, Poverty, Young children

Grace C, Shores EF, Zaslow M, Brown B, Aufseeser D, Bell L. 2006. Proceedings of the Rural Early Childhood Forum on Hurricane Recovery and Emergency Preparedness. Mississippi State, MS: National Center for Rural Early Childhood Learning Initiatives, 23 pp. (Rural early childhood report no. 4)

Annotation: This report describs the Rural Early Childhood Forum on Hurricane Recovery and Emergency Preparedness held on December 5, 2005, in Mobile, Alabama. The report includes the forum agenda, written versions of presentations and discussions, and a list of participants. Maps and color photographs are included.

Contact: National Center for Rural Early Childhood Learning Initiatives, Mississippi State University, 46 Blackjack Road, Mailstop 9749, P.O. Box 6013, Mississippi State, MS 39762, Telephone: (662) 325-4836 Fax: (662) 325-5436 Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Costs, Disaster planning, Disasters, Early childhood education, Emergencies, Head Start, Mental health, Prevention, Rural populations, Young children

Jaycox LH, Morse LK, Tanielian T, Stein BD. 2006. How schools can help students recover from traumatic experiences: A tool-kit for supporting long-term recovery. Santa Monica, CA: Rand Gulf States Policy nistitute, 46 pp. (Working paper WR-377)

Annotation: This toolkit for school personnel is designed to help readers understand how to help students recover from trauma. the toolkit defines trauma, explains how to select students for participating in trauma-related programs, compares programs geared toward a variety of types of trauma (nonspecific trauma, disaster-related trauma, programs for traumatic loss, programs for exposure to violence, and programs for complex trauma), describes programs, and discusses how to find funding.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Disasters, Emotional trauma, Programs, School age children, School health programs, Trauma, Violence

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2006. Pediatric terrorism and disaster preparedness: A resource for pediatricians - Summary. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 34 pp.

Annotation: This summary presents highlights from a report prepared by the American Academy of Pediatrics for the Agency for Heallthcare Research and Quality. The purpose of the report is to enhance the role and capabilities of pediatricians in planning for and responding to natural disasters and bioterrorist events and to ensure that the special needs of children are incorporated into local, state, regional, and federal disaster preparedness planning and response. A list of resources for additional information is provided.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 06(07)-0056-1.

Keywords: Children, Disaster planning, Disasters, Pediatricians, Terrorism

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2006. Strategies and tools for meeting the needs of children: Public health emergencies. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality,

Annotation: This Web conference, broadcast January 11, 2006, explores key issues surrounding the preparedness planning for the care of children. It highlights innovative research, and tools and models that can be used in developing effective preparedness strategies for addressing the unique needs of children. Topics include lessons learned following Hurricane Katrina, children exposed to chemical agents, special considerations in emergency preparedness to address pediatric needs, and updates to national guidelines. Web resources include streaming video, PowerPoint slides, and text versions.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child safety, Children, Conferences, Disaster planning, Emergencies, Emergency medical services for children, Pediatrics, Poisoning

Pickett OK. 2005–. Information review: Reaching out to children following disasters. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brief review gives sources of information useful to professionals and parents who are seeking ways to help children cope with disasters and terrorism, including injury; loss of loved ones' destruction of homes, schools, and workplaces; and other trauma. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Child mental health, Coping

Illinois Department of Public Health and University of Illinois at Chicago, Disaster Emergency Medicine Readiness Training Center. 2005. Disaster preparedness: The dental team's role. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois at Chicago, Disaster Emergency Medicine Readiness Training Center, 1 DVD.

Annotation: This DVD showcases the satellite conference for dentists, dental hygienists, and local health department preparedness staff held on May 18, 2005, at the University of Illinois at Chicago Disaster Emergency Medicine Readiness Training Center. Topics include the "all hazard" response, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention level A agents, the potential role of oral health professionals in the preparedness and response arena, and perspectives of various collaborating agencies such as the American Medical Association, the American Dental Association, and the Illinois State Dental Society. DVD contents include presentations, PowerPoint presentation slides, and supporting articles.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Conferences, DVDs, Disaster planning, Emergencies, Emergency medical services, Illinois, Oral health, Personnel, Provider participation

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2005. Terrorism and other public health emergencies: A reference guide for media. Washington, DC]: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 259 pp.

Annotation: This guide, intended for those working in the media, provides information about how the public health system is preparing for and will respond to terrorist acts and other public health emergencies. The guide addresses the following topics: (1) planning for the unthinkable: preparation and response in public health, (2) biological agents, (3) chemical agents, (4) radiation emergenices, (5) terrorism and the food supply, (6) environmental safety and testing, (7) the role of the federal government, (8) self-care for media, (9) range of public reactions, (10) risk communications during a terrorist attack or other public health emergency, (11) history of biological, chemical, and radiation emergencies, and (12) media contacts. The guide includes 10 appendices: acronyms, selected Web sites, a glossary, description of relevant acts, family disaster planning, disaster supplies and personal workplace supplies kit, self-monitoring checklist, reducing stress and renewing energy, and helping children and adolescents cope.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 647-D, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 690-7850 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/news/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Disaster planning, Disasters, Emergencies, Environmental health, Families, Federal government, Manuals, Mass media, Public health, Terrorism

U.S. General Accounting Office. 2004. HHS bioterrorism preparedness programs: States reported progress but fell short of program goals for 2002. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 45 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the extent to which states completed 2002 cooperative agreement requirements for two programs: the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Health Preparedness and Response for Bioterrorism Program and the Health Resources and Services Administration's National Bioterrorism Hospital Preparedness Program. The report also addresses whether states identified any factors that hindered implementation of the two programs. Some information is presented in tables throughout the report. The report includes a "results in brief section"; the remainder of the report is a series of PowerPoint slides.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-04-360R.

Keywords: Bioterrorism, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cooperative agreements, Disaster planning, Emergencies, Federal programs, Health Resources and Services Administration, Program evaluation, State programs

Berman S, Diener S, Dieringer L, Lantieri L. 2003. Talking with children about war and violence in the world. Cambridge, MA: Educators for Social Responsibility, 28 pp.

Annotation: This guide explores questions that parents and teachers ask about ways to have discussions with children about events such as war, terrorism, and military involvement in distant lands. The guide covers listening to students, responding to students' concerns, and teaching for understanding and promoting positive action. The appendix lists essential questions about the war with Iraq.

Contact: Educators for Social Responsibility, 23 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 492-1764 Secondary Telephone: (800) 370-2515 Fax: (617) 864-5164 E-mail: educators@esrnational.org Web Site: http://www.esrnational.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Child mental health, Parent education, Violence, War

Grantmakers in Health. 2003. Strengthening the public health system for a healthier future. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 48 pp. (Issue brief no. 17)

Annotation: This issue brief synthesizes key points from an expert dialog held November 6, 2002 to examine the status of national and local efforts to maintain the public health system and prepare for the possibility of bioterrorism. Topics include an examination of the role and weaknesses of the nation's public health infrastructure; organizational, workforce and competency capacity; information and data systems; and emergency preparedness in the public health infrastructure. Sections on conclusions and references are also included.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Emergency medical services, Health care delivery, Program evaluation, Public health infrastructure, Public health services, Terrorism

National Advisory Committee on Children and Terrorism. 2003. Recommendations to the Secretary. Atlanta, GA: National Advisory Committee on Children and Terrorism, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines recommendations to aid in identifying and preparing a comprehensive public health strategy to ensure the safety of America's children and to meet their physical, medical, psychological, and special needs in the face of the threat of terrorism. Topics include federal responsibilities, schools and other child congregate care settings, mental health and psychosocial support, primary care pediatric providers, pre-hospital and hospital care, community involvement, training, health intelligence, risk communication and public education, emergency medical service systems and protocols, and the strategic national stockpile of essential medical materials. The appendices include a list of Advisory Committee members, advisors, and consultants, and selected Department of Health and Human Services accomplishments and initiatives related to children and terrorism.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response , 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 638-G, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 205-2882 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/aspr Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health services, Emergencies, Emergency medical services for children, Mental health services, Public health services, Strategic plans, Terrorism

National Center for Disaster Preparedness, Program for Pediatric Preparedness. 2003. Pediatric preparedness for disasters and terrorism: A national consensus conference—Executive summary. New York, NY: National Center for Disaster Preparedness, 45 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the issues discussed at the National Consensus Conference on Pediatric Preparedness in Disasters and Terrorism held in Washington, DC in February 2003 to develop consensus recommendations as well as a research agenda on the needs of children in disaster and terrorism preparedness. Topics include emergency and prehospital care, hospital care, emergency preparedness, terrorism preparedness and response, mental health needs, school preparedness and response, training and drills, and future research agenda and funding. Also included are conclusions, future directions for additional research, and a list of abbreviations. The final section of tables outline pediatric item requirements for shelters, recommended therapies and prophylaxis of anthrax and additional diseases in children, recommended treatment and management of chemical agents used in terrorism, autoinjector usage by age and weight of child, guidelines for KI dose administration, marrow stimulative agents, and radionuclides produced after radiologic terrorism or disaster, internal contamination, toxicity and treatment. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Disaster Preparedness, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 845-2300 E-mail: ncdp@columbia.edu Web Site: http://www.ncdp.mailman.columbia.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child health services, Child mental health, Children, Conferences, Disaster planning, Emergency medical services for children, Pediatric care, School safety, Terrorism

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.