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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Smoking/Tobacco Use Prevention Bibliography

Smoking/Tobacco Use Prevention

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 23 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published in the last ten years that discuss the prevention of smoking and tobacco use. Included are policy reports and educational materials that focus on prevention among chlidren and adolescents.

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 23 records.

Oregon Health Authority. 2016. E-cigarette primer. [Salem, OR]: Oregon Health Authority, 3 pp.

Annotation: This document describes electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), the potential health risks associated with the use of e-cigarettes by adolescents and adults, the lack of evidence for and marketing of e-cigarettes as smoking cessation tools, and related policy initiatives in Oregon.

Contact: Oregon Health Authority, 500 Summer Street, N.E., E-20, Salem, OR 97301-1097, Telephone: (503) 947-2340 Secondary Telephone: (877) 398-9238 Fax: (503) 947-2341 E-mail: OHPBinfo@state.or.us Web Site: http://www.oregon.gov/oha Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Consumer protection, Environmental exposure, Local initiatives, Marketing, Nicotine, Oregon, Poisoning, Policy development, Product safety, Smoking, State agencies, State initiatives

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 2014. Best practices for comprehensive tobacco control programs. [Atlanta, GA]: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 141 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to help states plan and establish comprehensive tobacco control programs. It describes an integrated programmatic structure for implementing interventions proven to be effective and provides the recommended level of state investment to reach these goals and to reduce tobacco use in each state. On the basis of evidence of effectiveness documented in the scientific literature and the experiences of state and local programs, the guide identifies the most effective population-based approaches with the following overarching components: state and community interventions, mass-reach health communication interventions, cessation interventions, surveillance and evaluation, infrastructure administration and management.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Comprehensive programs, Intervention, Model programs, Population surveillance, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Program management, Public health infrastructure, Smoking cessation, State programs, Tobacco

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2013. Tobacco use in children and adolescents: Primary care interventions. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, multiple items.

Annotation: This web site provides recommendations, evidence, and related items for primary care clinicians to provide interventions, including education or brief counseling, to prevent initiation of tobacco use in school-aged children and adolescents. It updates the 2003 recommendations and reviews the evidence on the effectiveness of primary care interventions on the rates of initiation or cessation of tobacco use in school-aged children and adolescents and on health outcomes, such as respiratory health, oral health, and adult smoking. It also provides new recommendations for interventions and identifies research needs and gaps.

Contact: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, 540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850, Telephone: (301) 427-1584 Web Site: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Intervention, Prevention, Primary care, School age children, Tobacco use

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2012–. BeTobaccoFree.gov. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource provides consolidated information from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) for the public about tobacco. It includes information about tobacco, federal and state laws and policies, health statistics, and evidence-based methods for quitting. A social media dashboard provides updates from DHHS tobacco-related social media accounts.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Multimedia, Pregnant women, Smoking cessation, Tobacco

Network for LGBT Health Equity. 2012. Mpowered: Best and promising practices for LGBT tobacco prevention and control. Boston, MA: Network for LGBT Health Equity, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines best and promising practices for tobacco use prevention and control for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community using the World Health Organization’s best practices model, MPOWER (Monitor, Protect, Offer, Warn, Enforce, and Raise), which outlines the key steps for effective tobacco control programs and additional letters -- E for Evaluate (and disseminate) and D for Diversify -- to address all of the key challenges that LGBT and overlapping disparity populations face. The target audience for the report includes policy makers, grant makers, grant applicants, and tobacco control program administrations.

Contact: Network for LGBT Health Equity, The Fenway Institute, Boston, MA Telephone: (617) 927-6451 E-mail: http://lgbthealthequity.wordpress.com/contact/ Web Site: http://lgbthealthequity.wordpress.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, High risk groups, Homosexuality, Model programs, Prevention, Program improvement, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2011. Best practices in adolescent tobacco prevention and cessation webinar. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 1 webcast (89 min, 50 sec.). (Richmond Center webinar series)

Annotation: This webinar, which was sponsored by the American Academy of Pediatrics and held on July 27, 2011, provides information on best practices in adolescent tobacco-use prevention and cessation in clinical and community settings. In addition, presenters provide background about the issue, identify emerging products, and discuss how they affect adolescents.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Community programs, Counseling, Marketing, Smokeless tobacco, Smoking, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use

Greaves L, Poole N, Okoli CTC, Hemsing N, Qu A, Bialystok L, O'Leary R. 2011. Expecting to quit: A best-practices review of smoking cessation interventions for pregnant and postpartum girls and women (2nd ed.). Vancouver, BC: British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women's Health, 104 pp.

Annotation: This report examines interventions designed to reduce or eliminate smoking during pregnancy. Using a systematic review methodology from the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) combined with a "better practices" methodology developed in 2002, the report identifies components of interventions and programs for pregnant smokers that commonly appear in the effective interventions. These components include counseling, peer support, quit guides, partner counseling, information/education, nicotine replacement therapies, incentives, feedback about biological changes, group support, and various forms of follow up. Based on evidence for their effectiveness and methodological strength, the authors recommend 14 interventions and classify 27 others as “showing promise.”

Contact: British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women's Health, E311 - 4500 Oak Street, Box 48, Vancouver, BC, CANADA V6H 3N1, Telephone: (604) 875-2633 Secondary Telephone: (888) 300-3088 x2633 Fax: (604) 875-3716 E-mail: bccewh@cw.bc.ca Web Site: http://www.bccewh.bc.ca/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Interventions, Pregnant women, Program improvement, Research reviews, Smoking cessation

Holtby S, Zahnd E, Grant D, Park R. 2011. Children's exposure to secondhand smoke: Nearly 2.5 million affected in California [rev. ed.]. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 8 pp. (Health policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief presents findings from the California Health Interview Survey on rates of exposure to secondhand smoke in the home of children under age 12 in California. Topics include public health efforts to reduce smoking rates, regions of in which children are at greatest risk, African-American children's risk, and lower-income children's risk.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, California, Child health, Geographic factors, Income factors, Low income groups, Passive smoking, Prevention, Public health, Public policy, Racial factors, Smoking, State surveys

American Dental Hygienists' Association. 2010. Want some life saving advice? Ask your dental hygienist about women and smoking. Chicago, IL: American Dental Hygienists' Association, 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses the prevalence of smoking among girls and women, the health effects of smoking on women, and the role of the dental hygienist in providing information about quitting.

Contact: American Dental Hygienists' Association, 444 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 3400, Chicago, IL 60611, Telephone: (312) 440-8900 Fax: (312) 440-1806 Web Site: http://www.adha.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cancer, Educational materials, Oral health, Periodontal disease, Smoking, Women's health promotion

Boonn A. 2010. Tobacco cessation works: An overview of best practices and state experiences. Washington, DC: Campaign for Tobacco-free Kids, 5 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides an overview of smoking cessation and answers the following questions: (1) What is tobacco cessation; (2) why is quitting tobacco use so difficult? (3) how effective are cessation services? (4) how do tobacco cessation services compare to other services? (5) what are the benefits of quitting? and (6) are tobacco cessation insurance benefits and services cost effective? The fact sheet compares individual interventions such as counseling and pharmacotherapy with population-based interventions such as clean air laws and excise tax increases. Included are links to additional tobacco-cessation fact sheets.

Keywords: Intervention, Model programs, Prevention services, Smoking cessation, State initiatives, Tobacco use

Ontario [Canada] Medical Advisory Secretariat. 2010. Population-based smoking cessation strategies: A summary of a select group of evidence-based reviews. Ontario, [Canada]: Ontario Medical Advisory Secretariat, 44 pp. (Ontario Health Technology Assessment Series 2010; v. 10, no. 1)

Annotation: This report summarizes existing evidence-based reviews of the clinical and economic outcomes of population-based smoking cessation strategies in the providence of Ontario, Canada. The report, which was presented to the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee, provides a clinical and economic summary of the evidence surrounding nine population-based strategies for smoking cessation: Mass media interventions, telephone counselling, post-secondary smoking cessation programs (colleges/universities), community-wide stop-smoking contests, community interventions, physician advice to quit, nursing interventions for smoking cessation, hospital-based interventions for smoking cessation, and pharmacotherapies for smoking cessation. Included is a detailed description of the evidence-based analysis (including the literature search, outcomes of interest, and the statistical analysis), the results of the analysis, and listings of search strategies, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis used in the report. Thirteen tables summarize data findings.

Contact: Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, M-1B114, Macdonald Block, 900 Bay Street, Toronto, ON M7A1N3, Telephone: (866) 532-3161 Secondary Telephone: (800) 387-5559 Fax: (416) 314-8721 E-mail: ccu.moh@ontario.ca Web Site: http://www.health.gov.on.ca Available from the website.

Keywords: Canada, Evidence based medicine, Literature reviews, Outcome evaluation, Research reviews, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use

American Dental Hygienists' Association. 2009. Ask. Advise. Refer.. Chicago, IL: American Dental Hygienists' Association, multiple items.

Annotation: These materials, which are geared toward dental hygienists, are for the American Dental Hygienists' Association's national Smoking Cessation Initiative, Ask Advise Refer, which is designed to promote cessation intervention by dental hygienists. Materials and information include a cessation toolkit, consumer resources, information about continuing education, and related links. Selected contents include protocols; templates for producing stickers; and intervention and follow-up cards, presentations, a fact sheet on tobacco quitlines, and posters.

Contact: American Dental Hygienists' Association, 444 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 3400, Chicago, IL 60611, Telephone: (312) 440-8900 Fax: (312) 440-1806 Web Site: http://www.adha.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental hygienists, Oral health, Public awareness campaigns, Resources for professionals, Smoking cessation

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2006. The health consequences of involuntary exposure to tobacco smoke: A report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 709 pp.

Annotation: This report documents the adverse health effects of involuntary exposure to tobacco smoke in adults, children, and infants. Contents include the toxicology of secondhand smoke, assessment and prevalence of exposure, reproductive and developmental effects from exposure to secondhand smoke, respiratory effects in children, cancer among adults, cardiovascular diseases and respiratory effects in adults, control of secondhand smoke exposure, and a vision for the future.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html $49.00; also available from the website. Document Number: GPO # 017-024-01685-3.

Keywords: Adults, Adverse effects, Child development, Child health, Children, Passive smoking, Smoking, Spanish language materials, Tobacco use

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2005. WISEWOMAN works: A collection of success stories on empowering women to stop smoking. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a glimpse into ways that WISEWOMAN projects are helping low-income women throughout the United States stop using tobacco products and lower their risk for cardiovascular disease. The report is intended for those working to promote the health of low-income women and can be used to gain support for successful efforts, to make women aware of the benefits of programs, and to complement other sources of information. The report includes general information about the WISEWOMAN program as well as the success stories themselves. The success stories are grouped into the following categories: (1) empowering and motivating women, (2) expanding staff capacity, (3) giving access to counseling and medication, (4) responding to women's needs, and (5) building partnerships. Two appendices are included: (1) writing your own success stories and (2) resources.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Cardiovascular diseases, Community programs, Federal initiatives, Low income groups, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use, Women's health

CityMatCH. 2005. Youth smoking prevention. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH,

Annotation: This Web conference discusses methods to prevent adolescents and a youths from using tobacco products. Three expert presenters give an in-depth description of a national or local anti-tobacco program they are involved with. Powerpoint presentations accompany the presentations detailing tobacco use prevalence, effects, and other pertinent data. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Model programs, Program descriptions, Program evaluations, Statistics, Tobacco use, Youth

Minnesota Department of Health, Family Health Division, MCH-FAS Prevention. 2004. Women and substance use in the childbearing years: A prevention primer. [Mounds View, MN]: Minnesota Prevention Resource Center, 155 pp.

Annotation: This primer discusses the problem of substance use, including alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs, in women and girls in Minnesota, especially during pregnancy; and describes how community education can address this problem, with information about specific groups including African Americans, American Indians, Latinos, and college students. The majority of the primer lists and describes resources in a wide variety of formats tohelp understand and educate others about these problems. Formats include printed materials, videos, Internet resources, resource centers, and services. Addresses of vendors are included. The primer includes eight appendices covering topics such as selecting information, community prevention strategies, recognizing and treating alcohol abuse and addiction, and a calendar of health observances.

Contact: Minnesota Prevention Resource Center, 38460 Lincoln Trail, Box 549, North Branch, MN 55056, Telephone: (651) 674-4085 Secondary Telephone: (877) 935-4426 Fax: (651) 277-4085 E-mail: mprc@cpyf.org Web Site: http://www.emprc.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Addiction, Adolescent females, Alcohol consumption behaviors, Bibliographies, Cigarette smoking, Communities, Depression, Directories, Domestic violence, Mental health, Minnesota, Pregnancy, Prevention, Public health, Risk factors, Sexual abuse, Substance abuse, Women's health

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 2004. The 2004 Surgeon General's report: The health consequences of smoking—What it means to you. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report for consumers discusses findings from the Surgeon General's 2004 report on the health consequences of smoking and what they mean to the consumer. The topics covered include cancer, cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases, reproductive effects, and other effects. The report also discusses the benefits of quitting, the physiological effects of quitting, the difficulties associated with quitting, and tips for quitting.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Consumer education materials, Health, Reproduction, Respiratory diseases, Smoking, Smoking cessation, Smoking cessation

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2004. The health consequences of smoking: A report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 941 pp., exec. summ. (20 pp.).

Annotation: This report focuses on the health effects of active smoking and on diseases related to active smoking. The report, which includes an executive summary, covers major groups of the many diseases associated with smoking: cancers, cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases, reproductive effects, and other adverse health consequences. The report also discusses the impact of smoking on disease and the benefits of smoking reduction. A vision for the future is included, as well. Each chapter includes a reference list. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. One appendix lists recent studies that represent major additions to the literature. The report concludes with a list of abbreviations, a list of tables and figures, and an index.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Health, Health behavior, Reproductive hazards, Reproductive health, Respiratory diseases, Smoking, Smoking cessation

Cawley J, Markowitz S, Tauras, J. 2003. Lighting up and slimming down: The effects of body weight and cigarette prices on adolescent smoking initiation. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 29 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 9561)

Annotation: This paper examines the influence of body weight, body image, and cigarette prices in determining adolescent smoking initiation. The paper includes an introduction, a section discussing relevant literature, a methods section, a data section, an estimation and results section, an endogeneity section, and a summary. Statistical information is presented in tables grouped together at the end of the paper. The paper also includes a references list.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Body image, Body weight, Smoking, Weight loss

Christiansen AL, Commons JL, Olen AM, Remington PL. 2003. Youth smoking in Wisconsin: An assessment of trends in use and the progression to established smoking. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center and Wisconsin Division of Public Health, Monitoring and Evaluation Program, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report assesses trends in youth tobacco use in Wisconsin, presents state data to describe how youth smoking rates have changed in the last decade and compares how Wisconsin trends are similar to or different from national trends. Topics include background information on youth smoking in Wisconsin and the nation over the past decade and the various stages in which youth become regular smokers in Wisconsin. Technical notes provide information on the youth tobacco survey, definitions for the youth smoking continuum, the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance system, the Monitoring the Future Study, and Wisconsin's predicted 2002 current smoking prevalence. References conclude the report.

Contact: University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Monitoring and Evaluation Program, 610 North Walnut Street, 370 WARF, Madison, WI 53726, Telephone: (608) 262-2825 Fax: (608) 262-2425 E-mail: plreming@facstaff.wisc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, High school students, School age children, Smoking, State surveys, Trends, Wisconsin, Youths

Moise C, Fierro M. 2003. Tobacco growing states: Balancing agriculture development with youth tobacco prevention. Washington, DC: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, 6 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief reflects lessons learned from a meeting of agricultural and health leaders from 10 tobacco-growing states to share progress and best practices in preventing youth tobacco use while advancing agriculture and economic development. The brief discusses challenges for tobacco-growing states, establishing agricultural development foundations, implementing agricultural and economic development activities, and conducting tobacco prevention and cessation programs. Statistical information is presented in one table within the paper. The brief concludes with endnotes.

Contact: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, Hall of the States, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org/cms/center Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Child behavior, Prevention, Prevention programs, Smoking, Smoking cessation, State programs, Tobacco, Tobacco use

U.S. General Accounting Office. 2003. Tobacco use and public health: Federal efforts to prevent and reduce tobacco use among youth. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information on (1) programs, research, and activities that aim to prevent and reduce tobacco use among youth, (2) the effort of federal departments and agencies to monitor their programs, and (3) the coordination among federal departments and agencies in their efforts to prevent and reduce tobacco use among youth. The report provides results in brief and background. It also discusses the focus of federal programs, research, and activities related to youth tobacco use; federal departments' collection of information on their programs that aim to prevent youth tobacco use; and federal departments and agencies that coordinate in various ways to address tobacco use among youth. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. Four appendices include a description of the scope and methodology, a list of selected federal programs, comments from the Department of Health and Human Services, and General Accounting Office contact and acknowledgments.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-04-41.

Keywords: Adolescents, Collaboration, Federal programs, Monitoring, Tobacco use

Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Division for Learning Support: Equity and Advocacy. 2003. Clear the air: A secondhand smoke toolkit. [Madison, WI]: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 61 pp. (Bulletin no. 04045)

Annotation: This toolkit, targeted to middle school and high school students, includes materials that promote knowledge and skills to advocate for a healthy smoke-free environment. The toolkit is divided into nine main areas: basic facts/information, youth activities, youth advocacy, research/data, curriculum and other instructional materials, policy, tobacco control resource center and lending library for Wisconsin, fact sheets, and Web sites. Topics include the health risks of secondhand smoke; prevention, intervention, and cessation of tobacco use by youth; and school-based health, safety, and youth development programs and initiatives. Materials provided include survey forms, discussion topics, activity outlines, play scripts, and other resources for statistical and research articles. The toolkit includes color photographs and illustrations. A DVD of the publication is available.

Contact: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 125 South Webster Street, Madison, WI 53707-7841, Telephone: (608) 266-8960 Secondary Telephone: (800) 441-4563 Web Site: http://dpi.state.wi.us/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Advocacy, Child health, Curricula, Data, Environmental exposure, High school students, Internet, Middle school students, Passive smoking, Prevention programs, Public policy, Research, Smoking, Tobacco use, Wisconsin

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.