Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Smoking During Pregnancy Bibliography

Smoking During Pregnancy

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 18 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published in the last ten years that focus on the problems associated with smoking during pregnancy and also on prevention. Publications for both professionals and consumers are included.

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 18 records.

Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. 2014. Designed for addiction: How the tobacco industry has made cigarettes more addictive, more attractive to kids and even more deadly. Washington, DC: Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, 42 pp., exec. summ. (6 pp.).

Annotation: This report describes key ways in which tobacco companies design and manipulate their products to attract new youth smokers, create and sustain addiction, mislead consumers to think that they are reducing their risk of disease, and make it more difficult for users to quit.

Contact: Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, National Center for Tobacco-Free Kids, 1400 Eye Street, Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-5469 Fax: (202) 296-5427 Web Site: http://www.tobaccofreekids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Consumer education, Consumer protection, Drug addiction, Industry, Marketing, Nicotine, Tobacco, Product safety, Research, Risk assessment

Society for Public Health Education. [2013]. Smoking Cessation and Reduction in Pregnancy Treatment (SCRIPT®). Washington, DC: Society for Public Health Education,

Annotation: These resources are designed to assist health professionals in help pregnant women quit smoking. Program components include a guide that outlines a self-evaluation process to help build women's smoking cessation success over a seven-day period, a DVD that provides testimonials from pregnant smokers and demonstrates behavioral skills to quit smoking, comprehensive counseling to help pregnant smokers quit or significantly reduce smoking during pregnancy, and counseling and encouragement to establish a non-smoking home. The website also provides information about a one-day workshop designed to train health professionals to promote, implement, and evaluate SCRIPT® as part of routine prenatal care.

Contact: Society for Public Health Education, 10 G Street, N.E., Suite 605, Washington, DC 20002, Telephone: (202) 408-9804 Fax: (202) 408-9815 E-mail: info@sophe.org Web Site: http://www.sophe.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health education, Model programs, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Program descriptions, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, Training

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2013. Smoking cessation strategies for women before, during, and after pregnancy: Recommendations for state and territorial health agencies. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document explores a coordinated health systems approach to long-term cessation outcomes for women. The issue brief contains eight recommendations; key resources; and examples from states including Alabama, California, Colorado, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Utah. Topics include training and technical assistance to health professionals, quitline services, coordinated media campaigns, customized programs, points of intervention, cessation benefits in health plans, service integration, and tobacco-control policies that augment tobacco cessation for women.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Pregnant women, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, State initiatives, Tobacco use, Women's health

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2012–. BeTobaccoFree.gov. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource provides consolidated information from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) for the public about tobacco. It includes information about tobacco, federal and state laws and policies, health statistics, and evidence-based methods for quitting. A social media dashboard provides updates from DHHS tobacco-related social media accounts.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Multimedia, Pregnant women, Smoking cessation, Tobacco

Pregnets (Prevention of Gestational and Neonatal Exposure to Tobacco Smoke). 2012. Smoking cessation for pregnant and postpartum women: A toolkit for health care providers. [no place]: Pregnets (Prevention of Gestational and Neonatal Exposure to Tobacco Smoke), 22 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit for health care providers, educators, and researchers provides essential components to address smoking cessation and reduction among pregnant and postpartum women. It is divided into sections including: information about smoking and its effects on health, the benefits of quitting smoking, current information about smoking cessation interventions, and options on delivering brief interventions or more intensive counseling to help women quit or reduce smoking.

Contact: Prevention of Gestational and Neonatal Exposure to Tobacco Smoke, Web Site: http://www.pregnets.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant health, Passive smoking, Postpartum women, Pregnant women, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2012. Smoking cessation during pregnancy: Healthy Start and the SCRIPT Program. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 video (90 min.).

Annotation: This webcast provides background information about the Healthy Start Program, which works to expand the availability and accessibility of prenatal care in communities with higher-than-average infant mortality rates, and the SCRIPT program, which helps pregnant women quit smoking. The purpose of the webinar is to discuss how the SCRIPT program can be implemented in Healthy Start to reduce smoking rates during pregnancy.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Federal programs, Healthy Start, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. 2011. Smoking cessation during pregnancy: A clinician's guide to helping pregnant women quit smoking. Washington, DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 33 pp.

Annotation: This document comprises an educational program that provides the background and tools necessary for clinicians to implement an effective behavioral intervention to help their patient quit smoking. Topics covered include continuing medical education (CME) information; an introduction to the program, evidence-based guidelines, a quick-reference guide, steps to implementation, and postpartum relapse. CME credits are available for those who complete the program.

Contact: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street S.W., P.O. Box 96920, Washington, DC 20090-6920, Telephone: (202) 638-5577 Secondary Telephone: (202) 863-2518 E-mail: resources@acog.org Web Site: http://www.acog.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior, Educational programs, Infant health, Intervention, Postpartum women, Pregnant women, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, Women's health

Greaves L, Poole N, Okoli CTC, Hemsing N, Qu A, Bialystok L, O'Leary R. 2011. Expecting to quit: A best-practices review of smoking cessation interventions for pregnant and postpartum girls and women (2nd ed.). Vancouver, BC: British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women's Health, 104 pp.

Annotation: This report examines interventions designed to reduce or eliminate smoking during pregnancy. Using a systematic review methodology from the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) combined with a "better practices" methodology developed in 2002, the report identifies components of interventions and programs for pregnant smokers that commonly appear in the effective interventions. These components include counseling, peer support, quit guides, partner counseling, information/education, nicotine replacement therapies, incentives, feedback about biological changes, group support, and various forms of follow up. Based on evidence for their effectiveness and methodological strength, the authors recommend 14 interventions and classify 27 others as “showing promise.”

Contact: British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women's Health, E311 - 4500 Oak Street, Box 48, Vancouver, BC, CANADA V6H 3N1, Telephone: (604) 875-2633 Secondary Telephone: (888) 300-3088 x2633 Fax: (604) 875-3716 E-mail: bccewh@cw.bc.ca Web Site: http://www.bccewh.bc.ca/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Interventions, Pregnant women, Program improvement, Research reviews, Smoking cessation

Joyce TJ, Racine AD, Yunzal-Butler C. 2009. Maternal smoking and the timing of WIC enrollment. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 38 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14728)

Annotation: This paper investigates the association between the timing of enrollment in WIC and smoking among prenatal WIC participants across ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Data comes from Pregnancy Nutrition Surveillance System interviews taken from WIC participants in eight states.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Maternal health, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, WIC program

CItyMatCH and National Association of County and City Health Officials . 2008. Prevention of tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure before, during, and after pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials ,

Annotation: This site provides access to a June 19, 2008 webcast that highlights national, state, and local initiatives that address tobacco use and exposure and the health of MCH populations. Systems level approaches to smoking cessation among pregnant and parenting women, as well as the connection between environmental tobacco smoke and infant health were discussed. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Environmental exposure, Infant health, Local initiatives, National initiatives, Passive smoking, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, State initiatives, Tobacco use

Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. 2007. Women's health and smoking. Washington, DC: Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, 5 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about the health risks for women associated with cigarette smoking. The following topics are discussed: mortality, cardiovascular disease, lung cancer, other cancers, smoking and pregnancy, other health risks, and the benefits of quitting. Endnotes are included.

Contact: Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, National Center for Tobacco-Free Kids, 1400 Eye Street, Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-5469 Fax: (202) 296-5427 Web Site: http://www.tobaccofreekids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cancer, Lung cancer, Mortality, Smoking, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, Women's health

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2007. Preventing smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke before, during, and after pregnancy. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke before, during, and after pregnancy. The fact sheet offers facts about the consequences of smoking before and during pregnancy, the prevalence of smoking during the last 3 months of pregnancy,and the risks from exposure to secondhand smoke. Recommended strategies and policies are provided.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant health, Passive smoking, Public policy, Smoking, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, Women's health

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. 2007. Cigarette use among pregnant women and recent mothers. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 4 pp. (NSDUH report)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about cigarette use among pregnant women and women who recently gave birth. The fact sheet is based on the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, which asks female respondents ages 12-44 whether they are currently pregnant and how many months pregnant they are; it also asks respondents about their past-month use of cigarettes. This fact sheet examines cigarette use amoung three categories of women: (1) pregnant women, (2) women who recently gave birth, and (3) women who were not pregnant and did not recently give birth. The report discusses prevalence of cigarette use; past-month use, by demographic characteristics; and prevalence of cigarette use, by trimester. Findings in brief are included. Endnotes conlude the fact sheet.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies, 1 Choke Cherry Road, Room 7-1044, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (240) 276-1212 Web Site: http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Mothers, Smoking, Smoking during pregnancy, Women's health

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. 2006. Smoke-free families: State of the Science Capstone Meeting — conference report. [Princeton, NJ]: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 16 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the key points discussed at the State of the Science Capstone Meeting, held on October 18-29, 2006, at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). The meeting was part of the RWJF national program, Smoke-Free Families: Innovations to Stop Smoking During and Beyond Pregnancy. The purpose of the conference was to convene the researchers, practitioners, and advisors involved in Smoke-Free Families for reviews of the program's accomplishments, presentations of recent research findings, and discussions of future directions. The paper presents research findings, research questions that still need answers, and funding options that might support such research. A summary is included.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Financing, National programs, Research, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2006. The health consequences of involuntary exposure to tobacco smoke: A report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 709 pp.

Annotation: This report documents the adverse health effects of involuntary exposure to tobacco smoke in adults, children, and infants. Contents include the toxicology of secondhand smoke, assessment and prevalence of exposure, reproductive and developmental effects from exposure to secondhand smoke, respiratory effects in children, cancer among adults, cardiovascular diseases and respiratory effects in adults, control of secondhand smoke exposure, and a vision for the future.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html $49.00; also available from the website. Document Number: GPO # 017-024-01685-3.

Keywords: Adults, Adverse effects, Child development, Child health, Children, Passive smoking, Smoking, Spanish language materials, Tobacco use

Mattison DR, Wilson S, Coussens C, Gilbert D, eds.; Board on Health Sciences Policy, Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine. 2003. The role of environmental hazards in premature birth: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 127 pp.

Annotation: This book summarizes a workshop convened on October 2-3, 2001, to look at issues surrounding the impact of environmental exposure on the fetus in the uterus, risks of premature birth, as well as child health and well-being throughout life. In addition the role of social and behavioral factors such as stress, anxiety, depression, drug use, alcohol use, and tobacco smoking is discussed. Chapters include: (1) preterm birth and its consequences, (2) labor and delivery, (3) preterm birth and a brief summary of biological pathways, (4) preterm birth and gene-environment interactions, (5) the social implications of preterm birth, and (6) future directions for research. The book also contains abstracts of 18 relevant articles and references. Three appendices contain the workshop agenda, a list of speakers and panelists, and a list of workshop participants.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-09065-2.

Keywords: Childbirth, Conferences, Environment, Environmental exposure, Environmental influences, Genes, Labor, Maternal fetal exchange, Maternal health, Maternal mental health, Prematurity, Preterm birth, Research, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women

Bailey D, Taylor P, Zaichkin J, eds. 2002. Smoking cessation during pregnancy: Guidelines for intervention. Olympia, WA: Maternal and Child Health, Washington State Department of Health, 56 pp.

Annotation: This booklet provides clinicians with information about how to conduct a brief (5-15 minute) intervention with pregnant women to help women stop smoking, if they are ready to quit. The goals of the intervention described in the booklet are to understand the woman's position on smoking during pregnancy, the importance she places on quitting, and her confidence in her ability to succeed. The booklet also provides information on resources that clinicians can offer to women who want to quit smoking as well as information on use and prescription of smoking-cessation pharmaceutical aids during pregnancy. Topics discussed in the booklet include (1) stages of change and motivational interviewing, (2) provider scripts for motivating the client, (3) anticipating and managing problems, (4) provider script for managing relapse, and (5) pharmacotherapy. The booklet includes four appendices (1) Medicaid smoking cessation counseling benefit, (2) the 5 Rs (relevance, risks, rewards, roadblocks, repetition), (3) tobacco cessation resources, and (4) additional reading.

Contact: Washington State Department of Health, Office of Maternal and Child Health, P.O. Box 47835, Olympia, WA 98504-7835, Telephone: (360) 236-3502 Fax: (360) 236-2323 E-mail: mch.support@doh.wa.gov Web Site: Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Infant health, Intervention, Motivation, Prescription drugs, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy, Women's health

National Partnership to Help Pregnant Smokers Quit. 2002. Action plan. Chapel Hill, NC: National Partnership to Help Pregnant Smokers Quit, 34 pp.

Annotation: This action plan is developed by a coalition of 40 health, business, and government organizations committed to drastically reduce the number of women who smoke during pregnancy. The plan outlines a clinical and community-based intervention program for every pregnant smoker that involves health care providers, worksites, communities, state and federal government agencies, and the research community. The contents include an introduction and overview of the plan; consequences, challenges, and opportunities of preventing maternal smoking; aims and strategies of the action plan involving the health care system, using the media effectively; harnessing resources in communities and worksites; capitalizing on state and federal funding and policies; and promoting research, evaluation, and surveillance. The publication concludes with acknowledgments, references, and resources.

Contact: National Partnership to Help Pregnant Smokers Quit, 725 Martin Luther King Jr Boulevard, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7590, Telephone: (919) 843-7663 Fax: (919) 966-5764 E-mail: feedback@helppregnantsmokersquit.org Web Site: http://www.helppregnantsmokersquit.org/ Available at no charge.

Keywords: Pregnancy complications, Prenatal education, Prevention programs, Smoking cessation, Smoking during pregnancy

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.