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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Sexuality Education Bibliography

Sexuality Education

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 38 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published in the last ten years including teaching materials, position statements, surveys of state laws regarding sexuality education in the schools and materials for parents.

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 38 records.

D.C. Resource Center for Children with Special Health Care Needs. n.d.. Sexuality information resource list. Washington, DC: D.C. Resource Center for Children with Special Health Care Needs, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet lists resources on sexuality education, education curricula, health conditions and disabilities, online learning, educators and counselors, and national resources related to sexuality and children and adults with disabilities. Resources also cover parenting with a disability, reproductive health, sexual violence, and screening for abuse or violence.

Contact: D.C. Resource Center for Children with Special Health Care Needs, Washington, DC Web Site: http://dccshcn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Adults, Children with special health care needs, Disabilities, Sexuality education

Puritz A, Carmody MA. n.d.. Sexuality and children and youth with special health care needs: Information and education. Washington, DC: D.C. Resource Center for Children with Special Health Care Needs, 3 pp. (Fact sheet)

Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States. 2015. State profiles fiscal year 2014: A portrait of sexuality education and abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in the states. New York, NY: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States,

Annotation: These resources for advocates, educators, policymakers, public health professionals, parents, youth, and community stakeholders comprise profiles of sexuality education and abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in the United States. Topics include federal funding by state, total federal spending on abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, sexuality and HIV/STD education policies by state, and descriptions of evidence-based and comprehensive approaches to pregnancy-, STD-, HIV/AIDS-prevention and sexuality education programs.

Contact: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 90 John Street Suite 402, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 819-9770 Fax: (212) 819-9776 E-mail: siecus@siecus.org Web Site: http://www.siecus.org Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Abstinence, Federal MCH programs, Government financing, HIV, Model programs, Prevention programs, Sexual health, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases, State MCH programs

Advocates for Youth, Answer, Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States. 2014. National teacher preparation standards for sexuality education. [no place]: Future of Sex Education, 7 pp.

Annotation: These standards provide guidance to programs within institutions of higher education in order to better prepare undergraduate pre-service students to deliver sexuality education to children and adolescents in middle and high schools, focusing on programs that train health and physical education teachers. Contents include seven standards, along with a rationale, set of indicators, and examples. Topics include professional disposition, diversity and equity, content knowledge, legal and professional ethics, planning, implementation, and assessment.

Contact: Future of Sex Education, Web Site: http://www.futureofsexed.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Preservice training, Professional education, Sexuality education, Standards, Teachers

Bridges E, Hauser D. 2014. Sexuality education: Building an evidence- and rights-based approach to healthy decision-making. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 6 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides an overview of research on effective sex education, laws and policies that shape it, and how it can impact young people's lives.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Adolescent health, Community participation, Health promotion, Research, School age children, School health education, Sexual health, Sexuality education, Students, Youth

Mississippi First, Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, Women's Foundation of Mississippi. 2014. Sexuality education in Mississippi: Progress in the magnolia state. New York, NY: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 38 pp.

Guttmacher Institute. 2013. Sex and HIV education. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 5 pp. (State policies in brief)

Annotation: This brief summarizes state-level sex and HIV education policies, as well as specific content requirements, based on a review of state laws, regulations, and other legally binding policies. Topics include whether such education is mandated, parental involvement, contraception, marriage, negative outcomes, skills for healthy sexuality, and abstinence. Charts list requirements in each state.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence education, Contraception, Schools, Sexuality education, State legislation

Sorace D. 2013. Addressing sexual health in schools: Policy considerations. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 25 pp.

Annotation: This report provides research and best practices on policies that address adolescent sexual health in schools. It discusses the rationale for sexual health education and access to sexual and reproductive health services; explains why policy is important and describes policy parameters and the local policy process; and presents an overview of policy considerations related to sexual and reproductive health education and services. The report is intended to help guide educators, administrators, and advocates to assess the sexual health policies and practices in their states, school districts, and schools.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Policy development, Reproductive health, School health, School health education, School linked programs, School services, Sexuality education

Weitlauf A, White S, Yancey O, Rissler CN, Harland E, Van Tran C, Bowers J, Newsom C. 2013. The Healthy Bodies toolkit. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, 2 items.

Annotation: This toolkit provides two booklets to help parents talk to their children with intellectual or developmental disabilities about topics related to puberty, one addressing girls and one addressing boys. Topics include encouraging good hygiene and appropriate behavior and how to deal with physiological manifestations of puberty. The publications may be individualized to include an organization's name and its most frequent referrals. Appendices with social stories and visual supports are also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, PMB 40, 230 Appleton Place, Nashville, TN 37203-5721, Telephone: (615) 322-8240 E-mail: kc@vanderbilt.edu Web Site: http://www.kc.vanderbilt.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: , Adolescent health, Adolescents with special health care needs, Child health, Developmental disabilities, Psychosexual development, Puberty, Sex characteristics, Sexual development

Carmody MA. 2012. Resource list: Sexuality education for persons with developmental disabilities. Washington, DC: D.C. Resource Center for Children with Special Health Care Needs, 6 pp.

Annotation: This resource list includes information on assessment programs and curriculum guides; guides and problem-solvers; HIV and AIDS; films, slides, and videos; sexual abuse prevention materials; anatomically correct dolls and other aids; and other materials.

Contact: D.C. Resource Center for Children with Special Health Care Needs, Washington, DC Web Site: http://dccshcn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Adults, Children with special health care needs, Disabilities, Sexuality education

National Sexuality Education Standards: Core Content and Skills, K-12 Advisory Committee and Future of Sex Education Initiative. 2012. National sexuality education standards: Core content and skills, K-12. Bethesda, MD: American School Health Association, 42 pp. (Special report; A special publication of the Journal of School Health)

Annotation: These national education standards are intended to provide clear and consistent guidance on the essential minimum core content for sexuality education that is developmentally and age-appropriate for students in grades K-12. Developed as a result of the Future of Sex Education initiative that brought together health educators, advocates, policy makers, and other key players to create a strategic plan for sexuality education policy and implementation, the standards outline essential content and skills for sexuality education K-12 given student needs and available time and resources. The goals, guiding values, and principles behind the standards are also discussed. The standards are presented according to grade level and topic area, and additional resources are provided for teachers, school administrators, parents, and middle and high school students.

Contact: American School Health Association, 7918 Jones Branch Drive, Suite 300, McLean, VA 22102, Telephone: (703) 506-7675 Fax: (703) 506-3266 E-mail: info@ashaweb.org Web Site: http://www.ashaweb.org

Keywords: Curriculum development, Guidelines, Manuals, School health education, Sexuality education, Standards

Oregon Health Authority. 2012. Preconception health recommendations for young adults with disabilities: A final report from an Action Learning Collaborative. Salem, OR: Oregon Health Authority, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report presents recommendations from the Association of Maternal and Child Health Program's Action Learning Collaborative related to preconception health care for young adults with disabilities. It includes a discussion of this population and their unique challenges; a summary of the sexuality education standards in the state of Oregon; and a set of preconception health recommendations at the individual level, relationship level, community level, and societal level. The methodology used to develop the recommendations, as discussed in the report, included literature reviews, data analysis, and a survey of youth with disabilities. The purpose of the report is not only to share recommendations but to initiate a discussion, contribute to the body of knowledge in this area, and initiate action to better address the health of youth with disabilities of reproductive age.

Contact: Oregon Health Authority, 500 Summer Street, N.E., E-20, Salem, OR 97301-1097, Telephone: (503) 947-2340 Secondary Telephone: (877) 398-9238 Fax: (503) 947-2341 E-mail: OHPBinfo@state.or.us Web Site: http://www.oregon.gov/oha Available from the website.

Keywords: Disabilities, Guidelines, Oregon, Preconception care, Reports, Sexuality education, Special health care needs, Standards, State programs, Young adults, Youth

Axley DL, Zendell AL. 2011. Sexuality across the lifespan for children and adolescents with developmental disabilities. (Rev. ed.). Tallahassee, FL: Florida Disabilities Development Council, 114 pp.

Annotation: This instructional manual is designed to help parents and caregivers assist individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities in their explorations of self and sexuality. The manual presents hints for family members, discusses adapting for different learning styles, and offers tips. The manual also offers ideas for addressing the following topics: understanding the differences between males and females (grades K-5), changes in the body (grades 4-8), becoming an adult (grades 9-12), beginning social skills (grades K-8 and ongoing), advanced social skills (grades 6-12 as ready), dating, and sexual or physical abuse. A companion resource guide for educators is also available.It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Florida Disabilities Development Council, 124 Marriott Drive, Suite 203, Tallahassee, FL 32301-2981, Telephone: (850) 488-4180 Secondary Telephone: (850) 488-0956 Fax: (850) 922-6702 E-mail: fddc@fddc.org Web Site: http://www.fddc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents with developmental disabilities, Adolescents with special health care needs, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Dating, Families, Parents, Physical abuse, Sexual abuse, Sexuality, Social skills, Spanish language materials

Suellentrop K. 2011. What works 2011-2012: Curriculum-based programs that help prevent teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 30 pp.

Annotation: This document provides a list of programs that have been evaluated and found to be successful in changing adolescent sexual behavior, including delaying sexual initiation, improving contraceptive use, and reducing adolescent pregnancy. For each program, the document lists selected program effects, contact information, and links to additional program and evaluation information. The document offers advice on how to choose a program, catalogs the characteristics of effective programs, and offers some words of caution about what an effective program actually can accomplish.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Prevention programs, Resources for professionals, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Brochures, Intervention, Program descriptions

Advocates for Youth, Answer, Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States. [2010]. Future of sex education (FoSE). [no place]: Future of Sex Education, 1 v.

Annotation: This online resource describes the Future of Sex Education (FoSE), a collaborative project designed to create a national dialogue about the future of sex education and to promote the institutionalization of comprehensive sexuality education in public schools. It includes information on the history of sex education in the United States; current barriers to sex education implementation; statistics and profiles; a public education primer; a school health education primer; and an education glossary. It also provides links to select comprehensive sex education programs; lesson plans; national standards and assessment tools; a sex education tool-kit for states and communities; and related compendiums, programs, and publications. FoSE is a joint project of Advocates for Youth, Answer, and SIECUS.

Contact: Future of Sex Education, Web Site: http://www.futureofsexed.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Program improvement, Public education, School health education, School linked programs, Sexuality education

National Conference of State Legislatures. 2010. State policies on sex education in schools. Denver, CO: National Conference of State Legislatures,

Annotation: This page gives a summary of state requirements for sexuality education in schools, summarizes 2010 legislation on this topic, and links to related resources, including a LegisBrief of the same title which is available for purchase.

Contact: National Conference of State Legislatures, 7700 East First Place, Denver, CO 80230, Telephone: (303) 364-7700 Fax: (303) 364-7800 Web Site: http://www.ncsl.org Available from the website.

Keywords: School health education, Sexuality education, State legislation

Alford, S. 2008. Science and success, second edition: Sex education and other programs that work to prevent teen pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infections. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 112 pp.

Annotation: This document describes 26 programs found to be effective in reducing adolescent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, including those that are school-based, community-based, and clinic-based. It discusses the criteria for inclusion and major program effects.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, HIV, Model programs, Prevention, Programs, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Peters A. 2007. Sex education in Washington public schools: Are students learning what they need to know?. [Seattle, WA]: Healthy Youth Alliance, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on a research project conducted for the purpose of learning more about sexuality education and prevention programs that are in place in Washington's public schools. The report provides analysis with respect to the following four objectives: (1) to learn more about what is being taught at each grade level and how many hours of instruction students receive, (2) to identify who is teaching HIV/AIDS and sexuality education programs and their level of training, (3) to assess how many districts are aware of new guidelines pertaining to sexuality education programs and what (if anything) districts have done to change their curricula accordingly, and (4) to determine which topics related to sexual health and family life are being discussed, and why. Most of the information in the report is presented in tables and charts. The report also includes an executive summary, a description of the methodology, and a glossary of terms. The report includes one appendix, which contains a list of participating districts, the survey instrument, guidelines, and a list of Healthy Youth Alliance members.

Contact: Healthy Youth Alliance, C/O CHT Resource Group, 1809 Seventh Avenue, Suite 400, Seattle, WA 98101, Telephone: (206) 223-1186 Fax: (206) 447-9539 Web Site: http://www.healthyyouthalliance.com Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Child health, Curricula, Guidelines, HIV, Prevention programs, Research, School health education, Sexuality education, Washington

National Consensus Process on Sexual Health and Responsible Sexual Behavior. 2006. The National Consensus Process on Sexual Health and Responsible Sexual Behavior: Interim report. [Atlanta, GA]: National Consensus Process on Sexual Health and Responsible Sexual Behavior, 50 pp.

Annotation: This interim report focuses on the National Consensus Process (NCP) on Sexual Health and Responsible Sexual Behavior, a process on sexual health in which leaders of major constituency organizations with interest in sexual health participated. The goal of the NCP is to improve sexual health and responsible sexual behaviors in America. The report includes a letter from the former U.S. Surgeon General; an executive summary; a call to action; background; and a statement of agreement covering the following topics: vision, goal, sexuality, sexual health, individual responsibility, community responsibility, outcomes, and normative differences. Also included is a discussion of NCP areas of agreement and non-agreement and supporting documents; areas for further discussion; participant observations; commentary; and NCP's future. The report includes eight appendices: (1) best practices; (2) research recommendations; (3) HIV, AIDS, STDs, and STIs; (4) education and discussion of sexual health and responsible sexual behavior for youth by parents or caregivers; (5) sexual abstinence; (6) responsible and irresponsible social behavior; (7) sexual orientation; (8) NCP ground rules and meeting dates and locations.

Contact: Morehouse School of Medicine, Center of Excellence for Sexual Health, National Center for Primary Care , 720 Westview Drive, S.W., Suite 233, Atlanta, GA 30310, Telephone: (404) 756-5044 Secondary Telephone: (404) 756-8800 Fax: (404) 756-5709 E-mail: srachel@msm.edu Web Site: http://www.msm.edu/x769.xml Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Abstinence, Adolescent sexuality, Caregivers, HIV, Individual responsibility, Parents, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Sexual identity, Sexuality, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases, Social responsibility

Ratner J, Huberman B. 2006. The librarian's guide to sex education resources: Audiovisual, print, and Web-based materials for youth, parents, and youth-serving professionals. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 88 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides lists of resources that librarians can use to provide their patrons with sexual health information. The tips are intended to help librarians create a supportive environment, offer a wide range of the best sexual health resources, raise community awareness, and provide programming related to sexuality issues. The guide is divided both by type of media and by intended audience. The resources are divided into five sections according to type of media: video, audio, computer based, print, and Web based. Within these sections, resources are divided by appropriate audience (adolescents, parents, and adolescent-serving professionals). Each entry in the guide includes a detailed description of the resource, ordering information, and other information.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Health, Parents, Resource materials, Sexuality

Family Life Council. [2005]. Wise Guys: Male responsibility curriculum. Greensboro, NC: Family Life Council,

Annotation: This curriculum is designed to prevent adolescent pregnancy and sexually-transmitted diseases by communicating with adolescent males about issues concerning self, values, future goals, and sexuality; it focuses on both abstinence and contraception. The curriculum is a guide for instructors with all of the educational materials, handouts, and activities needed. Additional information on the Web site includes a customizable television spot about the program, a list of training sites, a description of variations in the Wise Guy program that are available, and materials for adolescents, parents, and professionals. Some of the material is in Spanish.

Contact: Wise Guys, Family Life Council, 301 East Washington Street, Suite 204, Greensboro, NC 27401, Telephone: (336) 333-6890 Fax: (336) 333-6891 E-mail: wiseguys@flcgso.com Web Site: http://www.wiseguysnc.org/

Keywords: Adolescent males, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Prevention programs, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases, Spanish language materials, Training materials

Haffner D, Ott KM. [2005]. A time to speak: Faith communities and sexuality education. (2nd ed.). Norwalk, CT: Religious Institute on Sexual Morality, Justice, and Healing, 56 pp.

Annotation: This paper reaffirms a call to action for churches, synagogues, and mosques to become actively involved in sexuality education within their congregations and in their communities. The paper discusses the following topics: (1) why religious institutions must become involved, (2) what is sexuality education, (3) how congregations can provide sexuality education, and (4) how congregations can support sexuality education in the community. Resources, closing words, and references are included.

Contact: Religious Institute, 21 Charles Street, Suite 140, Westport, CT 06880, Telephone: (203) 222-0055 Web Site: http://www.religiousinstitute.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-893270-36-X.

Keywords: Communities, Religious organizations, Sexuality education

Kempner ME, Batchelder M, Trevor C. [2005]. Community action kit to support comprehensive sexuality education. New York, NY: Sex Information and Education Council of the United States, 1 v.

Annotation: This kit on comprehensive sexuality education in schools is divided into eight sections: (1) getting started, (2) learning the basics, (3) understanding abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, (4) getting ready to advocate, (5) working with key players, (6) getting your message out, (7) knowing the opposition, and (8) finding more information. Information is provided on countering misleading statements, communication methods, sample formats for press releases, letters, surveys, and organizations active on both sides of the issue of comprehensive sexuality education.

Contact: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 90 John Street Suite 402, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 819-9770 Fax: (212) 819-9776 E-mail: siecus@siecus.org Web Site: http://www.siecus.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Community programs, Health promotion, Outreach, Sexual health, Sexuality education

Alan Guttmacher Institute. 2005. Sex education: Needs, programs, and policies. New York, NY: Alan Guttmacher Institute, 48 pp.

Annotation: This document, originally designed as a PowerPoint presentation, brings together research and analysis on sex education in the United States and its effectiveness in preventing unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among adolescents. The document includes background information about sexual activity among American adolescents, sex education policy and practice in public schools, the effectiveness of programs designed to delay sexual activity and to prevent unintended pregnancy and STDs among adolescents, and public opinion and public policies related to these topics.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Prevention programs, Public policy, Research, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Huberman B. 2005. Resources for families on parent-child communication (rev. ed.). Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 4 pp. (From research to practice)

Annotation: This fact sheet offers a list of selected resources and materials to help parents begin talking with their children about sex. Recommendations are arranged according to the following categories: (1) Web sites for parents, (2) Web sites for young people, (3) books and videotapes, and (4) organizations.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Children, Communications, Consumer education materials, Parent child relations, Resource materials

Huberman B, Alford S. 2005. Are you an askable parent?. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 2 pp. (From research to practice)

Annotation: This fact sheet, geared toward parents, provides tips on how to become an askable parent, defined as one that young people see as being approachable and open to questions. The fact sheet discusses why being askable -- especially about sexuality -- is important. It offers concrete suggestions for how to talk with young people about sexuality and about how to talk with children and adolescents in general. References are included.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Children, Communication, Consumer education materials, Parent child relations

Kirby D, Laris BA, Rolleri L. 2005. Impact of sex and HIV education program on sexual behaviors of youth in developing and developed countries. Research Triangle Park, NC: Family Health International, 45 pp. (Youth research working paper no. 2)

Annotation: This paper summarizes a review of 83 evaluations of sex and HIV education programs in developing and developed countries that are based on a written curriculum and that are implemented among groups of adolescents in schools, clinics, or other community settings. The review addressed two central questions: (1) what are the effects, if any, of curriculum-based sex and HIV education programs on sexual risk behaviors, sexually transmitted diseases, and pregnancy rates, and mitigating factors such as knowledge and attitudes that affect these behaviors? and (2) what are the common characteristics of the curricula-based programs that were effective in changing sexual risk behaviors? The paper, which includes an executive summary, presents the study methods, results, discussion, and recommendations. The paper includes one appendix that lists the developing country studies evaluated. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the paper. Endnotes are included.

Contact: FHI, P.O. Box 13950, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, Telephone: (919) 544-7040 Fax: (919) 544-7261 E-mail: services@fhi.org Web Site: http://www.fhi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Curricula, Developing countries, HIV, High risk adolescents, Prevention, Program evaluation, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Washington State Department of Health and Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. 2005. Guidelines for sexual health information and disease prevention. [Olympia, WA]: Washington State Department of Health, 5 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines provide a framework for medically and scientifically accurate sexuality education for Washington adolescents. The purposes of the guidelines are to (1) describe effective sexuality-education and its outcomes; (2) provide a tool for educators, policymakers, and others to evaluate existing or new programs, curricula, or policies; (3) enhance and strengthen sexuality-education programs; and (4) educate schools and school districts, community organizations, communities of faith, the public, the media, policymakers, and others involved in educating adolescents. The guidelines discuss the goals of sexuality education, guidelines for sexual-health information and disease prevention, and common characteristics of sexuality-education programs. A glossary is included.

Contact: Washington State Department of Health, P.O. Box 47890, Olympia, WA 98504-7890, Telephone: (800) 525-0127 Secondary Telephone: (360) 236-4030 Web Site: http://www.doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Disease prevention, Guidelines, Program evaluation, Programs, Public policy, Sexuality education, Washington

International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region. 2004. Peer to peer: Creating successful peer education programs. New York, NY: Western Hemisphere Region, International Planned Parenthood Federation, 52 pp.

Annotation: This guide describes the necessary steps to plan, implement, and evaluate a program to train youth to teach their peers about sexual and reproductive health (SRH). The guide contains adaptable tools to support program activities, as well as examples of SRH projects from International Planned Parenthood Federation World Hemisphere Region member associations in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Contact: International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region, 120 Wall Street, Ninth Floor , New York, NY 10005-3902, Telephone: (212) 248-6400 Fax: (212) 248-4221 E-mail: info@ippfwhr.org Web Site: http://www.ippfwhr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Evaluation, International programs, Peer education, Program planning, Reproductive health, Sexual health, Sexuality education, Youth

Manlove J, Franzetta K, McKinney K, Papillo AR, Terry-Humen E. 2004. A good time: After school programs to reduce teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 60 pp.

Annotation: This report for program providers, policymakers, and funders provides descriptions of those after-school programs that have been shown through research to have a positive impact on adolescent sexual behavior, such as delaying the onset of sex, increasing the use of contraception, and decreasing adolescent pregnancy. Contents include program profiles and key themes that emerged from evaluations of these programs; an overview of three types of after-school programs: curriculum-based sex education programs, youth development programs, and service learning programs; information on the costs and availability of program curricula; and program evaluation literature from which communities can draw in making their decisions about what programs they might consider using. The report also describes two sex education programs that did not affect adolescent sexual behavior. The appendix includes a program profile grid offering an outline of services included in the after-school programs.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, After school programs, Case studies, Community programs, Contraception, High risk adolescents, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Service learning, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Manlove J, Franzetta K, McKinney K, Papillo AR, Terry-Humen E. 2004. No time to waste: Programs to reduce teen pregnancy among middle school-aged youth. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 60 pp. (Putting what works to work)

Annotation: Produced in partnership with Child Trends, No Time to Waste provides detailed descriptions of programs for middle school-age students in abstinence and sex education and in HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases that have been shown through careful research to have a positive impact on adolescent sexual behavior. The publication provides detailed descriptions of program curriculum, costs, and evaluation results. It also describes programs that did not change participants' behavior. No Time to Waste was developed as part of the ongoing Putting What Works to Work project.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Abstinence, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Community programs, Costs, HIV, Middle schools, Model programs, Prevention, Prevention programs, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

National Public Radio, Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, and Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government. 2004. Sex education in America. Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation, 6 pp.

Annotation: This paper summarizes the debate over what types of topics should be covered in sex education classes in schools and what the overall approach to sex education should be. The paper also provides findings from a national survey about sex education that was conducted by NPR, the Kaiser Family Foundation, and Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the paper. The paper concludes with a methodology section.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Schools, Sexuality education, Surveys

Sex Information and Education Council of the United States, National Guidelines Task Force. 2004. Guidelines for comprehensive sexuality education: Kindergarten - 12th grade (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Sex Information and Education Council of the United States, 109 pp.

Annotation: This teaching guide provides a national framework for comprehensive kindergarten-12th grade sexuality education. Guideline contents include six key concepts recommended by the National Guidelines Task Force for inclusion in education programs—human development, relationships, personal skills, sexual behavior, sexual health, and society and culture. Each key concept is further divided into components and accompanied by developmentally appropriate information. Addition contents include the history and structure of the guidelines; goals, values, and fundamental principles; advice on using the guidelines, prioritizing topics, filling the gaps, evaluating and and existing curricula and lessons, and creating new ones. A section of additional resources includes relevant organizations and references.

Contact: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 90 John Street Suite 402, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 819-9770 Fax: (212) 819-9776 E-mail: siecus@siecus.org Web Site: http://www.siecus.org Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Child development, Child health, Developmental stages, Educational programs, HIV, Health education, School age children, Sexual development, Sexual identity, Sexuality, Sexuality education

Annie E. Casey Foundation. 2003. Walking the plain talk : A guide for trainers. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 136 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed for community-based organizations and policy makers interested in developing programs similar to Plain Talk, a neighborhood-based initiative aimed at helping adults, parents, and community leaders develop the skills and tools they need to communicate effectively with young people about reducing adolescent sexual risk-taking. It is a companion piece to the Plain Talk Starter Kit. This guide provides the following: (1) an overview of Plain Talk; (2) a description of the Plain Talk components (community mapping, walkers and talkers, and home health parties); (3) sample performance measures; and (4) a list of other resources. An appendix gives a set of Plain Talk survey forms for adults, adolescents, service sites, physicians, and sources for nonprescription contraceptives. A section of handouts includes sample pledge forms, fact sheets, self-evaluation tools, listening skills inventory, discussion and communications tips and scripts, and checklists.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Community participation, Community programs, Contraception, Local initiatives, Plain Talk program, Planning, Prevention programs, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Rue LA. 2003. Sexuality education policy 1990-2000: The influence of HIV and AIDS, an unintended consequence. Longmont, CO: Friends First, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report demonstrates the way HIV policy in the aftermath of the HIV/AIDS crisis of the 1980s spawned a new paradigm of sexuality education, and it proposes a new model of prevention efforts for communities to consider. The report includes the following chapters: (1) the historical context, (2) the legal-social context, (3) the inverted triangle of secondary prevention and public schools, (4) federal level, (5) analysis of the narrative--special interest groups, (6) state level, (7) role of teacher expectations, (8) problems associated at every level, (9) implications for schools, and (10) references. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Friends First, P.O. Box 270302, Littleton, CO 80127, Telephone: (800) 909-WAIT Secondary Telephone: (720) 981-9193 Fax: 720-981-9104 E-mail: info@friendsfirst.org Web Site: http://www.friendsfirst.org

Keywords: AIDS, Communities, Federal programs, HIV, Legislation, Prevention, Public schools, Schools, Sexuality education, State programs, Teachers

Stringer S. 2003. Failing grade: Health education in NYC schools: An analysis of K-8 health education in New York City's public school system. New York, NY: Scott Stringer, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report documents the discrepancy between New York State and City health education mandates for grades K-8 and actual practice in public school districts. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) poor health: the case of New York City youth, (2) health education in New York City, (3) diagnosing a sick health education program, (4) 5 steps to a cure, and (5) conclusion. Topics include lessons on HIV and AIDS, FL/SE (family living and sex education) mandated curricula, and levels of teacher training. Three apendices contain current New York State and City health education mandates for grades K-8, New York City district health coordinators' responses to survey questions, and a description of the benefits of health education for children and adolescents. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report.

Contact: Scott Stringer, 1 Centre Street, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10007, Telephone: 212-669-8300 E-mail: acolon@manhattanbp.org Web Site: http://www.mbpo.org/index.asp Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Elementary schools, Health education, Middle schools, New York, Public schools, School age children, Surveys

Collins C, Alagiri P, Summers T, Morin SF. 2002. Abstinence only vs. comprehensive sex education: What are the arguments? What is the evidence?. San Francisco, CA: University of California at San Francisco, AIDS Research Institute, 29 pp. (Policy monograph series)

Annotation: This monograph explores the arguments and the evidence for and against the effectiveness of abstinence only vs. comprehensive sex education. The monograph, which includes an executive summary discusses the role of federal and state policy, what research tells us, arguments for abstinence-only sex education, and arguments for comprehensive sex education. A conclusion is offered as well. One appendix includes a table of studies. The monograph concludes with endnotes.

Contact: University of California, San Francisco, AIDS Research Institute, 50 Beale Street, Suite 1300, San Francisco, CA 94105, Telephone: (415) 597-9164 Fax: (415) 597-8160 E-mail: drobb@ari.ucsf.edu Web Site: http://ari.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Public policy, Research, Sexuality education

Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States. 2002. Innovative approaches to increase parent-child communication about sexuality: Their impact and examples from the field. New York, NY: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 56 pp.

Annotation: This publication guides parents and caregivers, policymakers, public agencies, and educators in locating high-quality programs and information on sexuality education. The first part of the report, authored by Doug Kirby, provides scientific analysis of the available research on the effectiveness of programs designed to increase parent-child communication about sexuality. Part two includes 10 innovative approaches and 45 examples from the field that have been used to increase parent-child communications about sexuality-related issues. Conclusions, recommendations, organizational contact information, and references are also provided for each section. Some content is provided in Spanish.

Contact: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 90 John Street Suite 402, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 819-9770 Fax: (212) 819-9776 E-mail: siecus@siecus.org Web Site: http://www.siecus.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Communication skills, Community programs, Family life education, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Program descriptions, Sexuality education, Spanish language materials

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.