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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Life Course and Social Determinants Bibliography

Life Course and Social Determinants

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 47 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog.

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 47 records.

Maternal and Child Health Life Course Research Network. 2014–. Using existing data to examine life course health development. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities, multiple items.

Annotation: This webinar series is designed to help researchers use existing data to examine how health develops over the life course, and to assist local and state maternal and child health professionals in using existing data to examine the health status and needs of - and/or monitor progress in improving outcomes among - their target populations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities, University of California, Los Angeles, 10990 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 900, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-2583 Fax: (310) 312-9210 E-mail: chcfc@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthychild.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Data, Life course, Maternal health, Research

Golden O, McDaniel M, Loprest P, Stanczyk A. 2013. Disconnected mothers and the well-being of children: A research report. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 48 pp.

Annotation: This paper presents research findings on the major risks to children’s development, the prevalence of those risks among disconnected families, and the potential consequences for children. It also describes potential interventions to help disconnected families by increasing and stabilizing family income, enhancing parenting skills, supporting children directly, and reaching out to disconnected mothers who are not citizens. Finally, directions for future research are provided.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Families, Life course, Low income groups, Mother child relations, Poverty, Risk factors, Single mothers, Socioeconomic status, Unemployment

Planning Council for Health and Human Services, and Wisconsin Partnership Program, Lifecourse Initiative for Healthy Families. 2012. Milwaukee Lifecourse Initiative for Healthy Families community action plan. Milwaukee, WI: Planning Council for Health and Human Services, 208 pp.

Annotation: This community action plan focuses on the efforts of the Milwaukee Lifecourse Initiative to reduce infant mortality among blacks in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The action plan discusses background, provides a community description, and discusses the initiative and its efforts. Other topics include addressing socioeconomic conditions and stress, milestones and an evaluation plan, budget and resources, and a sustainability plan.

Keywords: Blacks, Budgets, Communities, Economic factors, High risk groups, Infant mortality, Initiatives, Prevention, Program evaluation, Racial factors, State programs, Stress, Trends, Wisconsin

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2012. Bringing it all together: Addressing infant mortality through Best Babies Zones. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 webcast (60 min.). (Funded by the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. (JMB))

Annotation: This webinar, held on September 18, 2012, provides an overview of the Best Babies Zones Initiative. The initiative embraces a lifecourse perspective and works to transform communities, improve birth outcomes, and reduce infant mortality. The webinar discusses the primary strategies of the initiative, as well as anticipated challenges and opportunities.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Economic factors, Education, Families, Health, High risk groups, Infant health, Infant mortality, Low income groups, Neighborhoods, Prevention, Programs, Schools

American Academy of Pediatrics and National Healthy Start Association. 2011. The social emotional development of young children: Resource guide for Healthy Start staff. Washington, DC: National Healthy Start Association, 12 pp.

Annotation: This guide focuses on the influence of early childhood experiences and skills on life-long trajectories of health and productivity. Topics include understanding brain development, social emotional development, the life course, and how Healthy Start staff can help parents promote their children's social and emotional development. The guide was designed with three unique covers as a way to address diversity within communities. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community based services, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Health promotion, Healthy Start, Life course, Mental health, Parent education, Psychosocial development

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2011. CDC health disparities and inequalities report -- United States, 2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 60(Suppl.):1-113,

Annotation: This report consolidates national data on disparities in mortality, morbidity, behavioral risk factors, health care access, preventive health services, and social determinants of critical health problems in the United States. The focus is on disparities in selected health determinants and outcomes by sex, race and ethnicity, education, income, disability status, and geography. Topics include education and income, housing, air quality, health insurance, influenza vaccination, colorectal cancer screening, infant deaths, motor vehicle-related deaths, suicides, drug-induced deaths, coronary heart disease and stroke deaths, homicides, obesity, preterm births, hospitalizations, asthma, HIV infection, diabetes, hypertension, binge drinking, adolescent pregnancy and childbirth, and cigarette smoking. The rationale for regular reporting on health disparities and inequalities and recommendations for universally applied and targeted interventions are included.

Contact: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr Available from the website.

Keywords: , Access to health care, Health behavior, Health statistics, Health status disparities, Intervention, Morbidity, Mortality, Preventive health services, Risk factors, Social indicators

Child Trends. 2011. LINKS (Lifecourse Interventions to Nurture Kids Successfully) . Washington, DC: Child Trends,

Annotation: This database summarizes evaluations of out-of-school time programs that work (or not) to enhance children's development. The database is directed especially to policymakers, program providers, and funders. Users may view a list of all programs (A-Z), select programs by specific criteria (target population, program characteristics, or outcome) or search for programs by outcome across the life course. The database definitions and methodology, program descriptions, and criteria are also available.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Databases, Intervention, Life course, Program evaluation

Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Issues and Research Gaps and Opportunities; Institute of Medicine. 2011. The health of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people: Building a foundation for better understanding. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 347 pp., brief (4 pp.).

Annotation: This report presents findings from work done by an expert committee to assess the health status of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations; identify research gaps and opportunities; and outline a research agenda to help the National Institutes of Health focus its research in this area. Topics include conducting research on LGBT populations; implementing a research agenda; and LGBT health status throughout the life course.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Health, Homosexuality, Research, Sexuality

Grantmakers in Health. 2011. Supporting children's healthy development: Place DOES matter. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 3 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This issue brief examines how communities where children live contribute to their healthy development. It describes how community-level factors such as education, employment, housing, neighborhood conditions,and access to quality care care -- the social determinants of health -- have a powerful influence on child health outcomes. The brief describes how success can be achieved using place-based approaches to child health outcomes and how investing in intensive place-based strategies is a promising way to tackle the factors that influence individual and community health outcomes. Examples of efforts taking place at the local level are included.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Community programs, Education, Employment, Factor analysis, Life course, Local initiatives, Model programs, Neighborhoods, Research, Socioeconomic factors

Institute of Medicine, Committee on Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2020. 2011. Leading health indicators for Healthy People 2020: Letter report. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 84 pp., brief (4 pp.).

Annotation: This report recommends 12 indicators and 24 objectives for guiding the national health agenda. The report is based on a review of current and past health indicator sets with consideration to provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Contents include a brief discussion of Healthy People 2020 and recommendations concerning topics, indicators, and objectives. In addition, the report discusses the framework and process used to select objectives, topics, and indicators. A detailed discussion of each objective is presented, along with suggestions for measures that could be used in three Healthy People topic areas for which no objectives exist: social determinants of health; health-related quality of life and well-being; and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender health. A brief summarizing the full report is also available.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu $18.90 plus shipping and handling; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-18637-7.

Keywords: Federal initiatives, Health care reform, Health objectives, Healthy People 2020, Measures

National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Educational Foundation. 2011. Partnering to promote health equity for adolescents. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Educational Foundation,

Annotation: This site hosts an archived webinar from May 25, 2011, that explores how health plans and health plan foundations can support health equity for adolescents through provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Topics include coordinated federal government efforts aimed at eliminating barriers to health care access and health insurance coverage, health disparities, health literacy, the "Teen 2xtreme" social media program, and a case study of social determinants of health in communities throughout Minnesota. The site contains the webinar archive, the agenda, speaker biographies, presentations, and additional resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health services, Adolescents, Case studies, Federal programs, Health care disparities, Health insurance, Health literacy, Minnesota

CityMatCH and Contra Costa Health Services, Family, Maternal and Child Health Programs, Life Course Initiative. [2010]. MCH life course toolbox. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH,

Annotation: This toolbox is an online resource for maternal and child health researchers, academics, practitioners, policy advocates, and others in the field. The toolbox shares information, strategies, and tools related to integrating the life course perspective into MCH research at the local, state, and national levels. The life course perspective looks at health not as disconnected stages by as an integrated continuum. Areas covered include theory and research, practice, education and training, and policy. There are also a life course game, a discussion board, and additional resources.

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Health, Internet, MCH research, Women's health

Maternal and Child Health Nutrition Council. [2010]. Improving the nutritional well-being of women, children and families. Johnstown, PA: Association of State and Territorial Public Health Nutrition Directors, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides information about strengthening the nutritional status of women, children, adolescents, and their families, including children with special health care needs. Topics include monitoring the nutritional well-being of maternal and child health (MCH) populations, public health nutrition work force, unmet state needs related to population-based MCH nutrition, MCH public health nutrition tasks and responsibilities, life course health development model, the MCH pyramid, the socio-ecologic model, and block grant opportunities.

Contact: Association of State Public Health Nutritionists, P.O. Box 1001, Johnstown, PA 15907-1001, Telephone: (814) 255-2829 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (814) 255-6514 Web Site: http://www.asphn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Block grants, Child health, Children with special health care needs, Families, MCH services, Nutrition, Public health, States, Women's health

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. [2010]. The life course approach. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau,

Annotation: This Web page identifies key resources relevant to the life course approach to conceptualizing health care needs and services. The goal of the page is to encourage MCH Training Programs to partner with the Maternal and Child Health Bureau to explore the implications of life course perspectives to improve the health and well-being of all women, children, adolescents, and families, now and in the future. Resources are divided into the following categories: fact sheets and policy briefs, peer-reviewed journal articles, presentations and course lecture series, and examples of local initiatives. Links to some of the resources are provided.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Families, Health care, Health services, Initiatives, Life course, MCH training programs, Resource materials, Women's health

Wyoming Department of Health, Community and Public Health Division. [2010]. Wyoming 2011-2015 maternal and child health needs assessment. Cheyenne, WY: Wyoming Department of Health, Community and Public Health Division, 173 pp.

Annotation: This mandatory report assesses the maternal and child health (MCH) program needs and the capacity to address them in the state of Wyoming for the period 2011-2015. The report explains the process used to assess the state's MCH needs for that five year period; describes existing state and local programs and collaborative efforts among them; and summarizes the strengths and needs of various population groups based on health measures that include health insurance, pregnancy intention, nutrition during pregnancy, low birth weight, and other indicators. A description of federal and state outcome measures is provided. The assessment is based on a life course perspective that emphasizes the impact of early life events and exposures on long-term health outcomes, highlighting the interplay of biological, behavioral, psychological, and social protective/risk factors that contribute to health outcomes across the span of a person’s life.

Contact: Wyoming Department of Health, 401 Hathaway Building, Fourth Floor, Cheyenne, WY 82002 , Telephone: (307) 777-7656 Secondary Telephone: (866) 571-0944 Fax: (307) 777-7439 Web Site: http://wdh.state.wy.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Child health, Needs assessment, State MCH programs, Title V, Women's health, Wyoming

2010. [Discussion paper series on social determinants of health]. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization,

Annotation: This series of papers provides a forum for sharing knowledge on how to tackle the social determinants of health to improve health equity. The papers explore themes related to questions of strategy, governance, tools, and capacity building. They aim to review country experiences with an eye to understanding practice, innovations, and encouraging frank debate on the connections between health and the broader policy environment.

Contact: WHO Press, World Health Organization, 20 Avenue Appia, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland, Telephone: +41 22 791 3264 Fax: +41 22 791 4857 E-mail: bookorders@who.int Web Site: http://apps.who.int/bookorders/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Health status disparities, International health, Patient advocacy, Resource allocation, Socioeconomic factors

California Endowment. 2010. Healthy communities matter: The importance of place to the health of boys of color. Los Angeles, CA: California Endowment, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights how the neighborhoods where Latino and African-American boys and young men grow up directly influence their health outcomes. It examines racial and ethnic disparities -- and the magnitude of these disparities -- between boys and young men of color and white boys and young men across four broad areas: health, safety, socioeconomic, and ready-to-learn. The report analysis and findings point to the need for comprehensive policy solutions implemented at the community level in order to reduce such disparities. Examples of promising programs in communities across the country are provided.

Contact: California Endowment, Greater Los Angeles Program Office, 1000 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012, Telephone: (800) 449-4149 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.calendow.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent males, Blacks, Community programs, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Factor analysis, Hispanic Americans, Life course, Male children, Minority health, Model programs, Neighborhoods, Policy development, Racial factors, Socioeconomic factors, Underserved communities, Young men

Fine A, Kotelchuck M. 2010. Rethinking MCH: The life course model as an organizing framework—Concept paper. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 20 pp.

Annotation: This paper clarifies and synthesizes the best thinking on maternal and child health life course and outlines how the theory might be used to frame the Maternal and Child Health Bureau's (MCHB) upcoming strategic planning process. Contents include an introduction to life course theory (LCT), implications of LCT for MCH public health; using LCT as a framework for MCHB strategic planning, and a section on developing an agenda for change.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Life course, MCH research, Resources for professionals, Strategic planning

Intermountain Healthcare Continuing Medical Education, Utah Nurses Association. 2010. Preconception health: A life-course perspective to treating women in Utah. Salt Lake City, UT: Intermountain Healthcare Continuing Medical Education, 19 items.

Annotation: This packet contains materials from a seminar held in August 2010 in Salt Lake City, Utah to educate regional physicians on preconception health care for women in Utah based on the life course perspective. The packet includes the seminar agenda, photocopies of presentation slides, information on Utah's Preconception Health Media Social Marketing Campaign, and copies of a preconception magazine for young women and a brochure about pregnancy spacing (in both English and Spanish), along with brochures from Child Care Aware to help expectant parents find affordable child care for their newborn. A compact disc containing all of the packet materials is included in the folder.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Development, Educational materials, Life course, Preconception care, Preventive health services, Professional education, Spanish language materials, Women's health

Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau of Family Health . 2010. Needs assessment for maternal, infant and early childhood home visiting program. Topeka, KS: Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau of Family Health , 82 pp.

Annotation: This mandatory document is the first step in the state of Kansas' multi-step process to identify high risk communities for home visiting services and assess the state's capacity to provide services in high risk communities. The document contains information that is supplemental to the Kansas grant under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. Included are community and state data reports; a report on the quality and capacity of existing home visiting programs; a report on the state capacity to provide substance use disorder treatment services; and a summary of results and plans to address unmet needs. The document describes the Kansas program as one that envisions child development within socio-ecological and life course development frameworks.

Contact: Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau for Children, Youth, and Families, 1000 S.W. Jackson, Suite 220, Topeka, KS 66612-1274, Telephone: (785) 291-3368 Secondary Telephone: (800) 332-6262 Web Site: http://www.kdheks.gov/bfh/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: High risk groups, Home visiting, Kansas, Legislation, Life course, Models, Needs assessment, State MCH programs

Lee V, Srikantharajah J, Mikkelsen L. 2010. Fostering physical activity for children and youth: Opportunities for a lifetime of health. Oakland, CA: Convergence Partnership, 34 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines a range of organizational practices and public policies to improve environments for regular physical activity among children and adolescents. The report focuses on national- and state-level efforts and opportunities that shape the local reality. The report is intended for funders, professionals, and advocates seeking an overarching strategy for addressing physical activity issues, as well as for those who have focused on a specific aspect of physical activity and can benefit from understanding a broader array of approaches. The report considers four target areas for physical activity: schools, early child care and early childhood education settings, out-of-school-time programs, and communities. For each area, the report provides background information, identified strategies and policies to effect change, and highlights key policy opportunities that promote increased physical activity levels among children and adolescents.

Contact: Convergence Partnership, PolicyLink, 1438 Webster Street, Suite 303, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 663-2333 Fax: (510) 663-9684 E-mail: http://www.kintera.org/site/lookup.asp?c=fhLOK6PELmF&b=3930101 Web Site: http://www.convergencepartnership.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Advocacy, Child care, Child health, Communities, Early childhood education, Funding, Health promotion, Life course, Physical activity, Programs, Public policy, Schools

Lowe JI. 2010. A new way to talk about the social determinants of health. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 35 pp. (Vulnerable populations portfolio)

Annotation: This guide provides a framework to help health professionals and policymakers effectively communicate about social determinants of health. The content addresses an iterative research and message-development process that includes three steps: determine how policymakers view the world of health, develop messages that can be tested, and strengthen the messages with testing. Additional topics include best practices in the language and framing of social determinants of health; the use of data and information; metaphors that drive how politicians see health disparities; and considering the roles of the mind, brain, and emotions when developing messages.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication skills, Model programs, Oral health, Policy development, Social factors, Social indicators

New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Maternal and Child Health. 2010. Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: New Hampshire statewide needs assessment. [Concord, NH]: New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Maternal and Child Health, 59 pp.

Annotation: This needs assessment provides a data analysis and capacity assessment of home visiting services in the state of New Hampshire. It includes an overview of current home visiting programs, indicating where there are disparities and gaps and identifying populations in need of additional services. The data analysis is based on the Social Determinants in Health construct, where indicators used to assess risk included the following: premature births, low birth weight, infant mortality, poverty, crime, domestic violence, child maltreatment, school dropout rates, substance abuse, and employment, to determine communities at higher risk. The report concludes with a narrative summary of the needs assessment results, including how the state will address unmet needs.

Contact: New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Maternal and Child Health, 29 Hazen Drive, Concord, NH 03301, Telephone: (603) 271-4517 Secondary Telephone: (800) 852-3345, x4517 Fax: (603) 271-4519 Web Site: http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/dphs/bchs/mch/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Home visiting, Needs assessment, New Hampshire, Reports, State MCH programs

[Thomas A]. 2010. Intervening early to address children's health disparities. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 2 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This issue brief provides information about health disparities that affect children from minority groups and those from families with low incomes. The report addresses the fundamental ways in which disparities are created and sustained across the life course for the purpose of developing interventions, policies, and programs that mitigate the effect of health disparities as children grow older. Topics include diversity of the child population, what is known about disparities, and opportunities for funders. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Costs, Ethnic factors, Financing, Income factors, Intervention, Low income groups, Programs, Public policy, Racial factors

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Research, Training, and Education. 2010. Integrating the life course model in MCH training programs. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Research, Training, and Education,

Annotation: This webcast, which was held on September 15, 2010, and sponsored by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB), focused on integrating the life course model into MCH Training Programs. The webcast provided an overview of the life course framework and MCHB's strategic vision. A panel of MCH Training Program directors shared their insights on how they have incorporated life course into their training curricula. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2340 Web Site: http://mchb.hrsa.gov/maternal-child-health-initiatives/workforce-training Available from the website.

Keywords: Curricula, Life course, MCH programs, Professional training

Wilson LB. 2010. Supporting families to improve oral health in Hawaii's Keiki. Honolulu, HI: Webfish Pacific, 1 video (6 min., 30 sec.).

Annotation: This video is designed to engage health professionals in partnering with families to improve oral health in infants enrolled in Early Head Start. Topics include the importance of healthy primary teeth, gum cleaning and toothbrushing, the role of home visiting in improving infant oral health, dental visit tips, and the importance of role models for children in promoting oral health over the life course.

Contact: Webfish Pacific, P.O. Box 61156, Honolulu, HI 96839, Telephone: (808) 382-5286 E-mail: webfish@webfishpacific.com Web Site: http://www.webfishpacific.com Available from the website.

Keywords: , Audiovisual materials, Dental care, Dental hygiene, Early Head Start, Family centered care, Hawaii, Health promotion, Home visiting, Infants, Oral health

Womack L, Sappenfield WM. 2010. Preconception health: An issue for every woman of childbearing age in Florida—Florida's preconception health indicator report. Tallahassee, FL: Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Family and Community Health, 1 v.

Annotation: This report looks at preconception health among Florida's women of childbearing age. The report covers 10 different health areas (general health status and life satisfaction, social determinants of health, health care, reproductive health and family planning, tobacco and alcohol use, nutrition and physical activity, mental health, emotional and social support, chronic conditions, and infections) and examines how Florida compares to the United States, compares over time, and compares among different socioe-demographic groups.

Contact: Florida Department of Health, 4052 Bald Cypress Way, Tallahassee, FL 32399, Telephone: (850) 245-4147 Fax: (850) 487-4574 Web Site: http://www.doh.state.fl.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Family planning, Tobacco use, Florida, Health care, Infections, Mental health, Nutrition, Physical activity, Preconception care, Reproductive heath, Social support, State surveys, Women's health

Davis LM, Kilburn MR, Schultz DJ. 2009. Reparable harm: Assessing and addressing disparities faced by boys and men of color in California. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 122 pp.

Annotation: This book summarizes a conceptual framework which describes macro, community, interpersonal, and individual level contextual factors that interact to promote or inhibit positive health outcomes. It then examines disparities in socioeconomic, physical and mental health, safety, and readiness to learn indicators that exist between boys and men of color and white boys and men in California. It calculates the odds for outcomes across a variety of indicators in these four domains to illustrate the challenges that boys and men of color are more likely to face in succeeding in life. It reviews strategies, practices, and policies for reducing these disparities and concludes with an appendix of data on additional indicators.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org $55 plus shipping and handling, or available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-8330-4561-4.

Keywords: Adolescent males, Blacks, California, Environmental influences, Health, Health status disparities, Hispanic Americans, Learning, Male children, Men, Minority groups, Safety, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Whites, Young men

Fine A, Kotelchuck M, Adess N, Pies C. 2009. A new agenda for MCH policy and programs: Integrating a life course perspective. Martinez, CA: Contra Costa Health Services, Family, Maternal and Child Health Programs, 7 pp. (Policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief emphasizes the importance of integrating a life course perspective, which emphasizes the importance of health across the the human life span, into maternal and child health (MCH). It describes how the life course model focuses on the importance of intervention during critical periods in time, and how the environment and other factors have a cumulative impact on health. The brief then describes how the MCH life course model can be transformed into concrete policies and programs. Initial ideas for developing a life course framework, along with starting strategies, are included.

Contact: Contra Costa Health Services, 50 Douglas Drive, Martinez, CA 94553, Telephone: (925) 957-5403 Fax: (925) 957-5409 Web Site: http://www.cchealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Child health, Health care reform, Human development, Life course, MCH health, Maternal health, Models, Policy, Program development, Program improvement, Risk factors

Halfon N. 2009. Life course health development: A new approach for addressing upstream determinants of health and spending. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Educational Foundation Foundation, 2 pp. (Expert voices)

Annotation: This essay describes how the life course health development (LCHD) model, which views health as a developmental process that takes place throughout the human life span, can be used to help reduce health risks, develop more effective health promotion strategies, and reduce health costs. It explains how health risk factors during the early years influence health trajectories and how early interventions during critical periods in health development can transform children's lives. The emphasis is on targeting upstream determinants of health upon which families, physicians, and communities can exert influence in efforts to prevent costly health treatment in later life.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Child health, Human development, Life course, Models, Prevention, Program development, Program improvement, Risk factors

James CV, Salganicoff A, Thomas M, Ranji U, Lillie-Blanton M, Wyn R. 2009. Putting women's health care disparities on the map: Examining racial and ethnic disparities at the state level. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 104 pp.

Annotation: This report assesses the status of women in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three dimensions: health, access and utilization, and social determinants. The first three chapters present data on the prevalence and rates for 25 indicators encompassed by these dimensions for women in various racial and ethnic groups, as well as state-level disparity scores. The fourth chapter presents state-level data on 8 indicators reflecting state policies and payment for Medicare and family planning, and health care work force availability. Each chapter begins with a description of the dimension and the indicators contained within it and provides a description of each indicator and highlights of findings.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Ethnic factors, Family planning, Low income groups, Medicare, Public policy, Racial factors, Social factors, State programs, Statistical data, Women's health

Pies C, Parthasarathy P, Kotelchuck M, Lu M. 2009. Making a paradigm shift in maternal and child health: A report on the National MCH Life Course Meeting. Martinez, CA: Contra Costa Health Services, Family, Maternal and Child Health Programs, 19 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the paradigm shift in maternal and child health that emerged from the National MCH Life Course Meeting (convened by the Life Course Work Group) that took place among national MCH experts in Oakland, California in June 2008. The report describes the objectives of the meeting and lists the following steps that might be taken to integrate the life course perspective into MCH: (1) develop an overarching vision statement; (2) map the landscape of what is currently being done and share it; (3) recognize that the life course perspective offers multiple points for intervention; (4) utilize health equity as a guiding principle; and (5) set an agenda to support priorities for changes in MCH policy. An appendix provides background information and a detailed description of the Life Course Model.

Contact: Contra Costa Health Services, 50 Douglas Drive, Martinez, CA 94553, Telephone: (925) 957-5403 Fax: (925) 957-5409 Web Site: http://www.cchealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Health care reform, Human development, Life course, MCH health, Maternal health, Meetings, Models, Program development, Program improvement

Rich J, Corbin T, Bloom S, Rich L, Evans S, and Wilson A. 2009. Healing the hurt: Trauma-informed approaches to the health of boys and young men of color. Los Angeles, CA: California Endowment, 83 pp.

Annotation: This report looks at the effects of trauma on the health of boys and young men of color (Hispanic and African American) over the course of their lifespan and explores ways in which poor health outcomes might be prevented or mitigated. Included are definitions of trauma and trauma theory; a review of the science related to trauma and brain development; a discussion of trauma as a social determinant; and possible applications of trauma knowledge to community prevention and system change efforts. Included is a detailed description of the Sanctuary Model -- an evidence-supported method for creating a culture in which healing from psychologically and socially traumatic experiences can be addressed. A list of selected references is included, along with an appendix of trauma experts in the state of California.

Contact: California Endowment, Greater Los Angeles Program Office, 1000 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012, Telephone: (800) 449-4149 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.calendow.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent males, Blacks, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Hispanic Americans, Human development, Life course, Male children, Mental health, Minority health, Prevention programs, Racial factors, Socioeconomic factors, Trauma, Young men

Thomas A. 2009. Reaching kids: Partnering with preschools and schools to improve children's health. Washington, DC: Grantmakers In Health, 41 pp. (Issue brief no. 35)

Annotation: This issue brief highlights the intersections between health and education systems in the United States, including the influences both systems have on children's healthy development across the life course. The brief is based on a Grantmakers In Health (GIH) issue dialogue that took place in May 2009. Themes discussed for health funders and other organizations to consider as they work with preschool- and school-based programs and interventions include the following: 1) improving children's school readiness in early childhood; 2) increasing children's access to health care services within educational settings; 3) encouraging children's healthy eating and active living; 4) coordinating school health services; and 5) increasing communication, linkages, and formal partnerships between schools, families, and other community stakeholders that serve children. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Collaboration, Health care systems, Preschool children, School age children, School health, School linked programs, Service coordination

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2009. Make change happen: Investing in healthy families across the lifespan–MCH Federal/State Partnership Meeting. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau,

Annotation: This webcast discusses the role of Title V MCH programs in making changes within a transformed health system through investments that build and sustain healthy families across the lifespan. The webinar covers the following topics: wellness and prevention, health disparities, social determinants/health equity, and life course perspective. In addition, the session focuses on means to help women lead longer and healthier lives. Materials include videos, transcripts, PowerPoint slides, and presenter biographies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Families, Federal MCH programs, Health systems, Multimedia, Prevention, Social Security Act, Title V, Social factors, Title V programs, Women's health

US Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2009. Title V MCH federal/state partnership meeting: Make Change Happen—Investing in Healthy Families Across the Lifespan [participant's notebook]. [Rockville, MD]: US Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 v.

Annotation: This participant's notebook contains information from the Title V MCH federal/state partnership meeting: Make Change Happen—Investing in Healthy Families Across the Lifespan, which took place on October 25-27, 2009, in Washington, DC. Contents include the agenda; goals and objectives; a participant list, partnership committee list, and speaker list; session information; select maternal and child health publications; and information about resource centers. Sessions covered transition from pediatric to adult primary care for youth with special health care needs; depression in parents, parenting, and children; integrating health equity, social determinants, and the life course perspective; resilience of women living with health conditions, health reform and its impact on MCH programs and populations; care coordination and the medical home; MCH obesity; improving birth outcomes; and child and adolescent injury and death.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Child health, Children with special health care needs, Conference proceedings, Costs, Depression, Families, Financing, Medical home, Obesity, Parenting skills, Prevention, Primary care, Primary care, Programs, Safety, Service coordination, Social Security Act, Title V, Social factors, Treatment, Unintentional injuries, Women's health

Wizeman TM, Anderson KM. 2009. Focusing on children's health: Community approaches to addressing health disparities--Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 111 pp.

Annotation: This book describes the evidence linking early childhood life conditions to adult health; discusses how early-life socioeconomic conditions can contribute to observed racial and ethnic disparities in health; and highlights successful models that engage both community factors and health care to affect life course development. The volume builds on issues raised in the 1995 National Academies book, Children's Health, the Nation's Wealth, with presentations and examples from the field. Included are chapters addressing disparities in children's health; early-life investments to promote children's health; how health policy changes can affect children's lives; community development approaches to improved health; and the role that private businesses can play in improving children's lives.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-13785-3.

Keywords: Adults, Child development, Child health, Community role, Development, Ethnic factors, Health policy, Models, Outcome, Racial factors, Risk factors, Socioeconomic factors, Young children

Braveman P, Sadegh-Nobari T, Egerter S. 2008. Early childhood experiences: Laying the foundation for health across a lifetime. [Princeton, NJ]: Commission to Build a Healthier America, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 9 pp. (Issue brief 1, Early childhood experiences and health)

Annotation: This brief addresses (1) how social and economic conditions early in life shape children's health and development, (2) how strong the evidence is connecting early childhood development programs with health, (3) what components of early childhood development programs work, and (4) how investing in early child development can improve America's health and economy.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childhood development, Model programs, Socioeconomic factors, Young children

Brennan Ramirez LK, Baker EA, Metzler M. 2008. Promoting health equity: A resource to help communities address social determinants of health. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 111 pp.

Annotation: This workbook is for public health practitioners and partners interested in addressing social determinants of health to promote health and achieve health equity. The workbook discusses health equity and how to achieve it and provides case studies of initiatives and programs working to achieve health equity. Information on how to develop a social determinants of health equity initiative is provided.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Initiatives, Case studies, Community programs, Health, Model programs, Program development, Public health, Social factors

CityMatCH. 2008. Life-course health development model. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH, (Emerging issues in maternal and child health)

Annotation: This Webcast, held on October 16, 2008, hosts narrated Powerpoint files from three presentations. The first presentation, by Neal Halfon, discusses the Life Course Development (LCHD) Model describing the impact of early life factors in health, psychology, sociology, and environment in the study of health across the lifespan. He shows how the LCHD model can be used to inform new approaches to health promotion, disease prevention and developmental optimization; the organization and delivery of health services, the financing of health services, and relevance to child health policy development. The second presentation, by Dr. Cheri Pies, focuses on applying the LCHD perspective in the local maternal, child, and adolescent health program. She outlines the experience of a local health program, gives suggestions and tips for getting started and achieving goals, and shares lessons learned. The third presentation, by Martha King, outlines efforts to communicate with state legislators about the LCHD Model and its potential in making policy at the state level. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Developmental stages, Early childhood development, Infant development, MCH research, Models, Multimedia, Risk factors, Risk management

Contra Costa Health Services, Family, Maternal and Child Health Programs, Life Course Initiative. 2008. A 12-point plan to close the black-white gap in birth outcomes. [Martinez, CA]: Contra Costa Health Services, Family, Maternal and Child Health Programs, Life Course Initiative, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about a plan that aims to improve health care services for at-risk populations, strengthen families and communities, and address social and economic inequities over the life course. The fact sheet discusses how the plan addresses these three topics.

Contact: Contra Costa Health Services, 50 Douglas Drive, Martinez, CA 94553, Telephone: (925) 957-5403 Fax: (925) 957-5409 Web Site: http://www.cchealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Communities, Education, Ethnic factors, Families, Fathers, Low income groups, Prenatal care, Racial factors, Service coordination, Working mothers

Grantmakers for Children, Youth and Families. 2008. Applying a life course perspective to children, youth and families. [Silver Spring, MD]: Grantmakers for Children, Youth and Families, (Learning summits)

Annotation: This website contains three files archiving a meeting held July 16, 2008 to explore the life course development framework and its implications for grantmaking to improve the lives of children, youth, and families at the Colorado Trust in Denver. A summary of a presentation is provided along with links to related reading sources, as well as the meeting agenda.

Contact: Grantmakers for Children, Youth and Families, 12138 Central Avenue, Suite 422, Mitchellville, MD 20721, Telephone: (301) 589-4293 Fax: (301) 589-4289 E-mail: info@gcyf.org Web Site: http://www.gcyf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Families, Human development, Life course, Life cycle, Meetings, Models, Public private partnerships

Lu MC, Lu JS. 2007. Maternal nutrition and infant mortality in the context of relationality. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies Health Policy Institute, 76 pp.

Annotation: This background paper explores the relationship between maternal nutrition and infant mortality, with an emphasis on the relationality - the concept of relationships and their associated effects upon maternal and infant well-being - have generated a new understanding of the infant mortality challenge. Chapter contents include (1) maternal nutrition and infant mortality with regard to birth defects, low birthweight, sudden infant death syndrome, complications of pregnancy, child health, growth, and development; (2) nutritional status and behaviors of pregnant women in the United States; (3) prenatal nutritional interventions and evidence of effectiveness; and (4) rethinking nutrition and infant mortality in the context of relationality over the life course. The paper discusses the strength of the evidence that these different factors are related. The final chapter includes recommendations on research, policy, and practice.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant feeding, Infant mortality, Maternal health, Maternal nutrition, Nutrition, Pregnant women, Prenatal care

Grason H, Misra D. 2006. Application of a lifecourse and multiple determinants framework to improve maternal health. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brief focuses on the maternal factor of obesity to illustrate how a single health determinant can influence health across the life span and how a life course health framework can serve as the basis for preventive health strategies across multiple determinants. It explores the changing demographics of pregnancy; the epidemiology of women, weight, and maternal health; a life course perspective for perinatal health; and an application of the life course framework to obesity in women. The brief also emphasizes how the new framework calls for a reexamination of public policies and public and private sector professional practice in efforts to improve outcomes for women of all ages and stages of reproductive potential, which in turn might improve outcomes for their offspring.

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Life course, Life cycle, MCH programs, Maternal health, Models, Obesity, Perinatal influence, Prevention, Program improvement, Risk factors, Women's health

Sareen H, Vicensio D, Russ S, Halfon N. 2005. The role of state early childhood comprehensive systems in promoting cultural competence and effective cross-cultural communication. Los Angeles, CA: National Center for Infant and Early Childhood Health Policy, 28 pp. (Building state early childhood comprehensive systems; no. 8)

Annotation: This report explores what it means for services to be culturally competent and how State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (SECCS) grantees can work toward enhanced levels of competence to improve the quality of services not just for children who are members of ethnic minority groups, but for all of America's children. Topics include a definition of culture, cultural competence and proficiency; the relevance of culture to SECCS initiative planning with examples from childrearing goals, parent attitudes and practices, and developmental milestones. Also discussed are the effect of early childhood experiences on the life course, persistent racial and ethnic disparities in health and education, cultural awareness and early childhood systems, and implications of cultural competence for early childhood policy. References conclude the report. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Childrearing, Cultural beliefs, Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Early childhood development, Ethnic factors, Parent child relations, Parenting, Program planning, Racial factors, Service delivery systems, Young children

Task Force on Community Preventive Services, Zaza S, Briss PA, Harris KW, eds. 2005. The guide to community preventive services: What works to promote health?. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 506 pp.

Annotation: This guide is a resource to help readers select interventions to improve health and prevent disease in their state, community, community organization, business, health care organization, or school. The guide reviews evidence about interventions designed to improve health across a wide range of topics, including tobacco use, physical inactivity, and violence; specific health conditions such as cancer, diabetes, vaccine-preventable diseases, and motor vehicle injuries; and broad social determinants of health such as education, housing, and access to health care. For each topic, interventions that promise to improve important health outcomes are reviewed. The guide answers three questions: (1) what has worked for others, and how well?, (2) how can I select among interventions with proven effectiveness?, and (3) what might this intervention cost, and what am I likely to achieve through my investment? Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the guide. The guide includes one appendix -- a comprehensive list of all findings included in the guide, presented in alphabetical order by topic. A glossary, an index, and references are included, as well.

Contact: Oxford University Press, 198 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (800) 451-7556 Secondary Telephone: (212)726-6000 E-mail: custserv@oup.com Web Site: http://www.oup.com/us $55.00, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 0-19-515108-9.

Keywords: Access to health care, Cancer, Communities, Costs, Diabetes, Disease prevention, Education, Evaluation, Health promotion, Housing, Injury prevention, Interventions, Motor vehicle injuries, Physical activity, Social factors, Tobacco use, Violence

Ngui E, ed. 2003. "From disparity to parity in health": Eliminating health disparities call to action. Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health and Health Disparities, 146 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a framework for understanding the magnitude of racial and ethnic disparities in North Carolina and some of the social determinants of these disparities. Topics include the role the Department of Health and Human Services in addressing these issues and specific action steps proposed by each division and office in the Department to address these issues, to reduce service barriers, and to provide services in a way that ensures all North Carolinians enjoy good health regardless of race, ethnicity, disability, or socioeconomic status. The document is divided into the following major sections: (1) purpose and vision, (2) North Carolina demographics, (3) overview: health disparities, (4) key areas of disparities in health status, (5) determinants of health, (6) disparities program assessment, (7) current gaps in eliminating health disparities, (8) implementation plans, and (9) external reviewers. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the document.

Contact: North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health and Health Disparities, 1110 Navaho Drive, Suite 510, Raleigh, NC 27609, Telephone: (919) 431-1613 Fax: (191) 850-2725 E-mail: OMHHD@ncmail.net Web Site: http://www.ncminorityhealth.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Demography, Ethnic factors, Health status, Healthy People 2010, North Carolina, Racial factors, Socioeconomic factors, State surveys

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.