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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Infant Mortality Bibliography

Infant Mortality

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 35 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published in the last ten years that discuss national or regional infant mortality programs, infant mortality review and Healthy Start.

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 35 records.

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. 2014. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and other sleep-related causes of infant death: Questions and answers for health care providers. Bethesda, MD: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 32 pp.

Annotation: This booklet for health professionals provides answers to common questions about sudden infant death syndrome and other sleep-related causes of infant death. The booklet, part of the Safe to Sleep® campaign, also includes references to scientific articles that describe the evidence on which the answers are based.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 14-7202.

Keywords: Infant mortality, Infants, Resources for professionals, SIDS, Sleep position

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Infant mortality and pregnancy loss: Resources for families (upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This resource brief helps families find links to care, services, and support and websites for expectant and new parents about ways to help babies survive and thrive, pregnancy loss, losing a baby, and grief. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bereavement, Bibliographies, Consumer education materials, Electronic publications, Families, Family support services, Grief, Infant death, Infant mortality, Infants, Pregnancy loss, Prevention programs

Minnesota Department of Health. 2013. Infant mortality in Minnesota: A summary of statistics, activities, and past work group recommendations-Region V Infant Mortality Summit. [St. Paul, MN]: Minnesota Department of Health, 35 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a summit in March 2013 to address the infant mortality problem in Minnesota, particularly racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality, and to lay a foundation for the development of a comprehensive plan by the Minnesota Department of Health and its partners to further reduce infant mortality. Section 1 provides an overview of infant mortality in Minnesota by putting into context the significant racial and ethnic infant mortality disparities that exist in the state. Sections 2 and 3 highlight infant mortality rates by selected infant and maternal characteristics. Section 4 addresses selected maternal behaviors linked to infant mortality such as smoking and alcohol consumption. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Drug use during pregnancy, Ethnic factors, Infant death, Infant mortality, Minnesota, Prenatal influences, Racial factors, Risk factors, State initiatives

National Healthy Start Association. (2012). Saving our nation's babies: The impact of the federal Healthy Start Initiative (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: National Healthy Start Association, 59 pp.

Annotation: This publication provides an overview of the history of the Healthy Start Initiative for the past 20 years and provides program descriptions for the 105 projects across the country. Topics highlighted include leadership training, regional roundtables, infant mortality, racism/health disparities, and fatherhood involvement.

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Healthy Start, History, Infant health, Infant mortality, Maternal health, Prenatal care, Prevention programs, Program descriptions

Bloom JK. 2012. Prenatal interventions that improve Native American pregnancy outcomes and reduce infant mortality: An integrative review. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University, 115 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study to identify interventions and perspectives that positively affect pregnancy outcomes and reduce infant mortality in indigenous (Native American) communities. It examines factors at the individual, interpersonal, community and public policy levels. The report describes the literature review used to identify documents and presents findings. Appendices include a research appraisal checklist, summaries of the literature reviewed, and a socioecological framework for pregnancy outcomes in native women.

Keywords: American Indians, Infant mortality, Literature reviews, Pregnancy outcome, Prevention programs

Rough A. 2012. The Partnership to Eliminate Disparities in Infant Mortality. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 2 pp. (Views from the field)

Annotation: This document provides information about the Partnership to Eliminate Disparities in Infant Mortality, which focuses on eliminating racial inequities contributing to infant mortality in U.S. urban areas. The brief discusses the partnership's activities, actions identified to reduce infant mortality, challenges and impacts, and lessons learned.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Communication, Infant mortality, Intervention, Prevention, Programs, Racial factors, Racial factors, Racism, Urban populations

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2012. Bringing it all together: Addressing infant mortality through Best Babies Zones. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 webcast (60 min.). (Funded by the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. (JMB))

Annotation: This webinar, held on September 18, 2012, provides an overview of the Best Babies Zones Initiative. The initiative embraces a lifecourse perspective and works to transform communities, improve birth outcomes, and reduce infant mortality. The webinar discusses the primary strategies of the initiative, as well as anticipated challenges and opportunities.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Economic factors, Education, Families, Health, High risk groups, Infant health, Infant mortality, Low income groups, Neighborhoods, Prevention, Programs, Schools

Urban Indian Health Institute. 2012. Native Generations. Seattle, WA: Urban Indian Health Institute,

Annotation: This website provides resources for Native Generations, a campaign addressing high rates of infant mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives which emphasizes connection to culturally-grounded health care and community services to promote healthy families and prevent infant deaths. It includes a video, materials for professionals to use in promoting the video, resources for new or expecting parents and caregivers, and reports.

Contact: Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle Indian Health Board, P.O. Box 3364, Seattle, WA 98114, Telephone: (206) 812-3030 Fax: (206) 812-3044 E-mail: info@uihi.org Web Site: http://www.uihi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Culturally competent services, Infant mortality, Prevention programs, Public awareness campaigns

National Healthy Start Association. [2011]. Infant mortality awareness campaign [fact card]. Washington, DC: National Healthy Start Association, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact card describes the infant mortality awareness campaign, Celebrate Day 366...Every Baby Deserves a Chance, developed by the National Healthy Start Association to celebrate babies living beyond the first year and take action in support of the Healthy People 2020 goal of improving the health and well-being of women, infants, children, and families. The fact card provides an overview of infant mortality, including statistics on the causes of infant mortality, differences in rates between non-Hispanic white and African American populations, and the infant mortality ranking of the United States in comparison with other countries. Cost savings associated with a reduction in the U.S. infant mortality rate are also highlighted, along with the ways in which the federally-funded Healthy Start program is working to improve birth outcomes.

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Infant mortality, Mortality rates, Pregnancy outcome, Prevention, Public awareness campaigns, Statistics

MacDorman MF, Mathews TJ. 2011. Understanding racial and ethnic disparities in U.S. infant mortality rates. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 7 pp. (NCHS data brief, no. 74)

Annotation: This data brief examines the disparities in infant mortality rates among racial and ethnic populations in the United States during the year 2007. Included are statistics showing (1) the gestational age-specific infant mortality rates among racial and ethnic groups; (2) the percentage of infants born preterm according to maternal race and ethnicity; (3) preterm causes of infant death among non-Hispanic black women and among Puerto Rican women; and (4) differences in the rates of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) among Asian and non-Hispanic white women. The brief describes the data source and methods used in compiling the data and highlights key findings.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Single photocopies available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Ethnic factors, Health status disparities, Infant mortality, Racial factors, Statistics

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. 2011. Plan for reducing infant mortality in Maryland. Baltimore, MD: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 4 pp.

Annotation: This report describes Maryland's progress in reducing infant mortality. It provides background and discusses the causes of infant mortality, risk factors, costs, the governor's goal for reducing infant mortality in the state, the strategic approach, community outreach, challenges and outlook, and partners.

Contact: Maryland Department of Health, 201 West Preston Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, Telephone: (410) 767-6500 Secondary Telephone: (877) 463-3464 Web Site: http://www.dhmh.maryland.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Infant mortality, Maryland, Prevention, Risk factors, State initiatives

Partnership to Eliminate Disparities in Infant Mortality. 2011. Infant mortality and racism: Action Learning Collaborative meeting summary. [no place]: Partnership to Eliminate Disparities in Infant Mortality, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the second of three meetings of the Infant Mortality & Racism Action Learning Collaborative held on June 1-3, 2009, in Long Beach, California. The report provides background and discusses communicating about racism; racism, stress, and reproductive disadvantage; and planning for change.

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant mortality, Racism, Reproductive health, Stress

Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle Indian Health Board. 2011. Looking to the past to improve the future: Designing a campaign to address infant mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives. Seattle, WA: Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle Indian Health Board, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines the burden of infant mortality and associated risk factors and barriers to improvement among American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) nationwide, provides an overview of the health communication campaigns that have been directed to this population, including the range of topic areas and methods for reaching AI/AN; and discusses select previous and current efforts in infant mortality prevention among AI/AN.

Contact: Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle Indian Health Board, P.O. Box 3364, Seattle, WA 98114, Telephone: (206) 812-3030 Fax: (206) 812-3044 E-mail: info@uihi.org Web Site: http://www.uihi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, High risk groups, Infant mortality, Low income groups, Prevention, Public awareness campaigns, SIDS

CityMatCH and National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2010. Community journeys to reduce infant mortality by addressing racism: Translating learning into action. [Omaha, NE]: CityMatCH; [Washington, DC]: National Association of County and City Health Officials, (Emerging issues in maternal and child health)

Annotation: This April 22, 2010, webinar describes how three national organizations and six communities across the country worked together to translate research and knowledge into action around racism. It details the Infant Mortality and Racism Action Learning Collaborative, a partnership which aims to decrease racial disparities in infant mortality in urban areas. Webinar topics included (1) key differences between health disparities and health equity, (2) processes by which teams can effectively approach and address racism, (3) the role of local and state health departments and other community organizations in reducing infant mortality by addressing racism, and (4) resources for local health departments. Meeting materials are also available from the website.

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Ethnic factors, Infant mortality, MCH research, Prevention services, Racial factors, Risk factors

Haines MR. 2010. Inequality and infant and childhood mortality in the United States in the twentieth century. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 28 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 16133)

Annotation: This paper examines trends in the United States during the 20th century using infant and childhood mortality as a social indicator of inequality. Using results from multiple surveys, microdata from the 1900 and 1910 Integrated Public Use Microsamples (IPUMS), published data from the Birth Registration Area in the 1920s, and the Linked Birth & Infant Death Files from the National Center for Health Statistics for 1991, the authors explore the relationship between infant and child mortality and variables such as family income, race, ethnicity, residence, occupation of the father or mother, and education of the parents. Tables include indexes indicating rates of child mortality in the United States in 1900 and 1910 according to the occupation of the father; mortality rates according to social class between the years 1895 and 1966; infant mortality rates by race of mother and education of father in 1991; and infant mortality in eight American cities in 1911-1915 according to variables such as the income of the father, the ethnicity of the mother, and whether or not the infant was breastfed.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mortality, Data analysis, Educational factors, Ethnic factors, History, Infant mortality, Racial factors, Research, Social factors, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Trends

Minnesota Department of Health. 2010. Sudden, unexpected infant death: Infant mortality trends, parental grief and the role of the public health nurse. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health,

Annotation: This video conference focuses on trends in sudden unexpected infant mortality and how to work with bereaved parents after the loss of an infant. Presentations focus on SIDS infant mortality trends; bereavement counseling; working with bereaved parents; preparing for home visits; developing listening skills; and risk factors that may complicate grief. The website provides access to the archived video conference as well as supplemental bereavement literature and other resources.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, P.O. Box 64975, St. Paul, MN 55164-0975, Telephone: (651) 201-5000 Secondary Telephone: (888) 345-0823 Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Bereavement, Conferences, Counseling, Grief, Infant mortality, Parent support services, Professional training, SIDS, Trends

Singh GK, Van Dyck PC. 2010. Infant mortality in the United States, 1935-2007: Over seven decades of progress and disparities. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 8 pp. (75 Title V anniversary celebration)

Annotation: This report, which focuses on infant mortality in the United States from 1935 to 2007, discusses trends in infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality by race; trends in infant mortality by birthweight, length of gestation, and maternal age; and leading causes of infant death. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Health status disparities, Age factors, History, Infant death, Infant mortality, Low birthweight, Pregnancy, Racial factors, Trends

Goode TD, Bronheim S, Buckley K. 2009. A guide for using the Cultural and Linguistic Competence Organizational Assessment instrument for fetal and infant mortality review programs. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 27 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance on using an accompanying self-assessment instrument to evaluate the cultural and linguistic competence of fetal and infant mortality review programs (FIMRs). It describes the benefits, values, and principles of self-assessment for organizations; the nature of the instrument; and a recommended four-phase approach to organizational self-assessment. It also provides answers to frequently asked questions; definitions of key terms; and a process for community engagement in self-assessment, including a focus group protocol. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Fetal death, Guidelines, Health promotion, Infant death review, Infant mortality, Local programs, Low income groups, Mental health, Underserved communities

Goode TD, Bronheim S, Buckley K. 2009. Cultural and linguistic competence organizational assessment instrument for fetal and infant mortality review programs. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 11 pp.

Annotation: This organizational self-assessment instrument is intended to help fetal and infant mortality review programs (FIMRs) to (1) plan for and incorporate culturally and linguistically competent policies, structures, and practices in all aspects of their work; (2) enhance the quality of case reviews and action plans within diverse and underserved communities; and (3) promote cultural and linguistic competence as an essential approach in the elimination of disparities and the promotion of health and mental health equity. The instrument gives definitions of terms used in the instrument, and a series of statements to assess the organization in these areas: (1) world view and practices related to cultural and linguistic competence; (2) staff diversity and training; (3) core functions including information gathering, case review, and community engagement; and (4) infrastructure, and funding. A companion document provides guidance on the use of this assessment tool. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Questionnaires, Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Fetal death, Health promotion, Infant death review, Infant mortality, Local programs, Low income groups, Mental health, Underserved communities

National Healthy Start Association. 2009. National Infant Mortality Awareness Month toolkit. Washington, DC: National Healthy Start Association, 25 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit, designed for Healthy Start projects and community public health projects for national infant mortality awareness month, lists facts and statistics on infant mortality and includes ideas and strategies for fundraising activities, advocacy, facts and statistics, as well as tips for approaching the media.

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Healthy Start, Infant mortality, Prevention programs, Public awareness campaigns, Resource materials

Oklahoma State Department of Health, Office of Minority Health. 2009. A healthy baby begins with you: Infant mortality baby shower. Oklahoma City, OK: Oklahoma State Department of Health, Office of Minority Health, 6 items.

Annotation: This web page provides information about the A Healthy Baby Begins with You baby shower held on April 30, 2009, in Oklahoma City, OK. The purpose of the shower was to improve birth outcomes and reduce infant mortality among African Americans in Oklahoma. The site includes links to the shower agenda (which also presents facts about infant death), a survey for shower participants designed to improve awareness about infant mortality,and a PowerPoint presentation about the survey. Also included are links to three tool kits. The first provides information about how to plan and implement a community baby shower to help individuals, groups, and communities improve birth outcomes. The second present information for media committees in charge of contacting media outlets to publicize the event. The third is a brochure that can be modified for any baby shower event, and then printed.

Contact: Oklahoma State Department of Health, 1000 N.E. 10th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73117, Telephone: (405) 271-5600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 522-0203 Web Site: https://www.ok.gov/health Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Community programs, Community surveys, Consumer education materials, Infant health, Infant mortality, Low income groups, Oklahoma, Prevention

2008. When the bough breaks. San Francisco, CA: California Newsreel with Vital Pictures, 1 video (29 min.). (Unnatural causes; episode 2)

Annotation: This video examines the increased rate of infant mortality among African Americans in the United States, contrasted to the rate of infant mortality in U.S. born white women and in African immigrants and the impact on African American women of racism and chronic maternal stress, The website contains transcripts of the video in English and Spanish, video clips, and other information. The Unnatural Causes series was broadcast by PBS; all episodes are available on one DVD.

Contact: California Newsreel, P.O. Box 2284, South Burlington, VT 05407, E-mail: contact@newslreel.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, DVDs, Infant mortality, Multimedia, Racial factors, Women

National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Program. 2008. Fetal and infant mortality review manual: A guide for communities. (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Program, 169 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides communities interested in developing a new Fetal and Infant Mortality Review (FIMR) Program, or continuing an existing FIMR program, with a step-by-step guide for implementing FIMR and making systems change happen for women, infants, and familles through FIMR. Contents include a description of the FIMR process, laying the groundwork, building community support and collaboration, abstracting medical records and conducting the home interview, basic team building and group process concepts for FIMR programs, the role of the case review team, the role of the community action team, taking stock of the FIMR process, and other maternal and child case review and related processes and the opportunities for collaboration. Standard definitions for reporting selected perinatal health statistics, and a glossary of terms, diagnoses and procedures is also included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Fetal-Infant Mortality Review Program, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street, S.W.***DEFUNCT***, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (202) 863-2587 E-mail: nfimr@acog.org Web Site: http://www.nfimr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child death review, Collaboration, Fetal death, Infant death review, Infant mortality, Investigations, Manuals, Neonatal death, Program development, Surveillance

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2008. Evidence of trends, risk factors, and intervention strategies: A report from the Healthy Start National Evaluation 2006—Racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 40 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an evidence base for Healthy Start and other perinatal health initiatives by describing the racial and ethnic disparities in birth outcomes and the risk factors that may be the underlying causes of differences in birth outcomes. The authors conducted a literature review to gather this information. The report, which includes an executive summary, covers the following topics: (1) racial and ethnic disparities in birth outcomes (including racial and ethnic trends in infant mortality and causes of infant death) and (2) risk factors for poor birth outcomes (including behavioral and biological and social risk factors). A discussion section is included. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report includes two appendices: detailed tables and a glossary. References are included.

Keywords: Ethnic factors, Healthy Start, High risk groups, Infant death, Infant mortality, Initiatives, Literature reviews, Perinatal health, Prevention programs, Racial factors, Risk factors, Trends

U.S. Office of Minority Health. [2007]. African American infant mortality campaign: A healthy baby begins with you. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Minority Health Resource Center, 2 pp.

Annotation: This Web site provides information about a national campaign to raise awareness about infant mortality with an emphasis on the African-American community. The site includes a link to a media kit, articles, information about community outreach, radio and video public service announcements, and other information, including Phase II of this campaign, Preconception Peer Educators (PPE) Program.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health Resource Center, P.O. Box 37337, Washington, DC 20013-7337, Telephone: (800) 444-6472 Secondary Telephone: (301) 251-1432 Fax: (301) 251-2160 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=1&lvlid=3 Available from the website.

Keywords: , Blacks, Infant mortality, Outreach, Prevention programs, Public awareness campaigns, Resource materials, World Wide Web

David R. 2007. Inequality matters: Infant mortality in the global village. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies Health Policy Institute, 14 pp.

Annotation: This background paper seeks to expand understanding of the causes and effects of infant mortality within a broader global context. It compares other nations across the globe, examining the impact of social and economic inequalities on population health and infant mortality. Contents include how inequalities and health are related, learning from participatory human relationships, case studies, inequality and economic health, structural violence and human suffering and dying, and pragmatic solidarity and public policy. References conclude the paper.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant mortality, International health, Low income groups, Poverty, Socioeconomic factors, War

Jocson M, Ramstrom K, Nettesheim-Engel K. 2007. Survey of California fetal infant mortality review programs. [Sacramento, CA]: Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, California Department of Public Health, 15 pp.

Annotation: This survey of California Fetal Infant Mortality Review (FIMR) coordinators, which was conducted from January through March 2007, was intended to gather information about the structure of current California FIMR programs, gaps in the FIMR process, and support and training needs. The study methods are described, and results are presented in tables.

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, MS 8305, P.O. Box 997420, Sacramento, CA 95899-7420, Telephone: (866) 241-0395 Fax: (916) 650-0305 E-mail: mchinet@cdph.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/MCAH/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Fetal mortality, Infant mortality, Research, State programs, Surveys, Training

Lu MC, Lu JS. 2007. Maternal nutrition and infant mortality in the context of relationality. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies Health Policy Institute, 76 pp.

Annotation: This background paper explores the relationship between maternal nutrition and infant mortality, with an emphasis on the relationality - the concept of relationships and their associated effects upon maternal and infant well-being - have generated a new understanding of the infant mortality challenge. Chapter contents include (1) maternal nutrition and infant mortality with regard to birth defects, low birthweight, sudden infant death syndrome, complications of pregnancy, child health, growth, and development; (2) nutritional status and behaviors of pregnant women in the United States; (3) prenatal nutritional interventions and evidence of effectiveness; and (4) rethinking nutrition and infant mortality in the context of relationality over the life course. The paper discusses the strength of the evidence that these different factors are related. The final chapter includes recommendations on research, policy, and practice.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant feeding, Infant mortality, Maternal health, Maternal nutrition, Nutrition, Pregnant women, Prenatal care

Mishra P, Newhouse D. 2007. Health aid and infant mortality. Washington, DC: International Monetary Fund, 40 pp. (IMF working paper WP/07/100)

Annotation: This paper presents new, systematic, and cross-country evidence to examine the relationship between health aid and infant mortality, using data from 118 countries between 1973 and 2004. The paper presents empirical specifications, discusses the data and shows descriptive statistics, presents results, discusses the impact of health aid in different environments, examines the relationship between overall aid and health outcomes, and presents preliminary evidence on aid and health spending. A conclusion, footnotes, and references are included. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report.

Contact: International Monetary Fund, 700 Nineteenth Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20431, Telephone: (202) 623-7000 Fax: (202) 623-4661 E-mail: publicaffairs@imf.org Web Site: http://www.imf.org $18.00; also available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Financing, Health, Infant mortality, International health, Statistical data

Delaware Healthy Mother and Infant Consortium. 2006. 2006 annual report: Reducing infant mortality in Delaware. [Dover, DE]: Delaware Healthy Mother and Infant Consortium, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information and statistical data about infant mortality in Delaware. The report discusses trends and includes infant mortality information by race, county, plurality (i.e., singleton vs multiple births), birthweight, gestational age, and leading cause of death.

Contact: Delaware Healthy Mother and Infant Consortium, Dover, DE Web Site: http://dhss.delaware.gov/dph/chca/imdhmichome.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Delaware, High risk infants, Infant mortality, Racial factors, State surveys, Statistical data, Trends

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2006. A toolkit for reducing infant mortality: Standards, regulatory, and legislative strategies [archive]. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau,

Annotation: This archived Webcast is of the October 31, 2006 meeting of leaders in MCH, SIDS, and other infant death in state and local communities to discuss a comprehensive response to sudden unexpected infant death. Topics include a range of standards and regulatory and legislative strategies to help institutionalize best practices or evidence-based practices. The meeting moderator was Johannie G. Escarne and presenters included Kathleen Graham, Jane Perkins, Terry W. Davis, Ann Malarcher, and Lori Cooper. Items available include audio and slides with captioning, slides, transcripts, and an MP3 audio file. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Multimedia, Conferences, Infant death, Infant mortality, Policy development, Resources for professionals, SIDS

Infant Mortality Task Force. 2005. Reducing infant mortality in Delaware: The Task Force report. [Dover, DE: Division of Public Health, Delaware Department of Health and Social Services], ca. 50 pp.

Annotation: This task force report focuses on infant mortality in Delaware and provides a course of action to eliminate barriers that result in reduced access to perinatal care among minority populations in the state. The report discusses infant mortality in general and the situation in Delaware, the causes of infant mortality, and what can be done to reduce infant mortality rates. Twenty recommendations, which include action steps, a start date, intended impact, and the agencies responsible, are presented. Costs of implementing the recommendations, and how to pay for them, are also discussed. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. A list of task force members and a glossary are included.

Contact: Delaware Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Jesse Cooper Building, 417 Federal Street, Dover, DE 19901, Telephone: (302) 744-4700 Secondary Telephone: (888) 459-2943 Fax: (302) 739-6659 E-mail: dhssinfo@state.de.us Web Site: http://www.dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dph/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Costs, Delaware, Financing, Infant mortality, Low income groups, Prenatal care, Racial factors

New York City Satellite/Medical Research Association of New York City. 2004. A case study of faith-based outreach in New York City: Lessons learned from a SIDS risk reduction initiative—Final report. [New York, NY]: New York City Satellite / Medical Research Association of New York City, 15 pp.

Annotation: This monograph is a case study that describes the research-driven process followed to design and implement a grandparent or elder faith-based SIDS-reduction outreach strategy to address African-American infant mortality disparity in New York City, using Back to Sleep campaign materials. The monograph is intended to help others who wish to implement SIDS-reduction programs in their own local settings. The monograph provides background and discusses addressing the need, developing a plan, identifying and training consultants and outreach educators, describing the educational format, evaluating the process and effectiveness of promoting the message, disseminating the message, and lessons learned. A summary is provided. The monograph concludes with a list of references. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Blacks, Case studies, Community programs, Consultants, Cultural factors, Education, Evaluation, Grandparents, Infant mortality, New York, Older adults, Outreach, Prevention programs, Racial factors, Religious organizations, Research, SIDS, Training

Field MJ, Behrman RE, eds.; Board on Health Sciences Policy, Committee on Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Children and Their Families. 2003. When children die: Improving palliative and end-of-life care for children and their families. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 490 pp.

Annotation: This book examines what is known about the needs of children who are dying, as well as the needs of their families; the extent to which these needs are being met; and what can be done to provide more competent, compassionate, and consistent care. The book offers recommendations for involving the child and parents in treatment decisions, strengthening the organization and delivery of services, hospice care, reducing financial barriers to care, developing support programs for bereaved families, training health professionals, ethical and legal issues; and expanding the knowledge base to guide clinicians and families. Nine appendices provide information on study origins and activities, prognostication scores, assess health-related quality of life in end-of-life care, bereavement experiences, end-of-life care in emergency medical services, education in pediatric palliative care, a description of a New York state demonstration project, and committee biographical statements. The book also includes a summary, a list of reviewers, a reference list, and an index.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-08437-7.

Keywords: Bereavement, Child death, Ethics, Families, Family support, Fetal death, Financial barriers, Health care delivery, Hospice services, Infant death, Palliative treatment, Parent professional relations, Professional training, Terminal care, Terminal illness

March of Dimes, Office of Government Affairs. 1999-. March of Dimes Foundation data book for policy makers: Maternal, infant, and child health in the United States. Washington, DC: March of Dimes, Office of Government Affairs, biennial.

Annotation: This data book for policymakers and others provides national and state data highlighting infant mortality, birth defects, preterm and low birthweight births, health insurance, and health promotion strategies. Information on access, data sources, state data and tables, and newborn screening terms are included.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Contact Phone: (800) 367-6630 Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available from the website. Document Number: 50-2650-12.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Congenital abnormalities, Health insurance, Health promotion, Infant mortality, Low birthweight, Maternal health, Neonatal screening, Preterm birth, Statistics

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.