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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

The History of Maternal and Child Health Bibliography

The History of Maternal and Child Health

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 240 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published in the last ten years that discuss overall racial and ethnic disparities in health, particular aspects of health where disparities exist, and specific racial and ethnic groups in comparison to others.

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 240 records.

Child Welfare League of America. n.d.. The history of White House conferences on children and youth. Arlington, VA: Child Welfare League of America, 78 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information on White House conferences on children and youth, beginning in 1909 and extending through 1970. A description of each conference is included.The report is primarily composed of multiple appendices that include supplementary documents pertaining to the conferences.

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child advocacy, Children, Conferences, Federal initiatives, Government, History, Youth

Children's Aid Society. n.d.. A history of innovation. New York, NY: Children's Aid Society, 1 v.

Annotation: This timeline tracks historic highlights from the Children's Aid Society's (CAS) founding in 1853, tracing changes in poverty in New York City along with the evolution of CAS programs and services. Topics include emigration programs such as the Orphan Train, foster care and adoption programs, lodging houses, industrial schools, convalescent homes, health centers, and farm schools.

Contact: Children's Aid Society, 105 East 22nd Street, New York, NY 10010, Telephone: (212) 949-4800 Secondary Telephone: (212) 949-4936 Fax: (212) 377-4705 Web Site: http://www.childrensaidsociety.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community programs, Comprehensive programs, History, Homeless persons, New York, Oral health, Poverty, Schools

Mandel CR, Hutchins VL. n.d.. Maternal and Child Health Block Grant legislative history, Vol. 1: 1981. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, ca. 250 pp.

Annotation: This notebook binder contains an assemblage of documents from 1981 on the consolidation of seven federal categorical programs into one maternal and child health services block grant. The documents include (1) a summary; (2) Public Law 97-35, Maternal and Child Health Services Block Grant Act; (3) an interpretation regarding the termination of certain grants; (4) final rules on the implementation of block grants; (5) House bill 3982; (6) Senate bill 79-492; (7) Senate report 1377; (8) conference report; (9-10) comparison of the House and Senate bills by the Association of State and Territorial MCH and Crippled Children Directors and by the American Academy of Pediatrics; (11) an additional conference report; (12) an excerpt from the Congressional Record; and (13) a work group memo regarding definitions to accompany the MCHS block grant act.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Federal MCH programs, History, Social Security Act, Title V

Peoples MD. n.d.. The role of maternity and infant care projects in reducing low weight births. Unpublished manuscript, 39 pp.

Annotation: This paper gives a historical overview of the Maternity and Infant Care (MIC) projects enabled through amendments to Title V of the Social Security Act in 1963. The paper presents available data on MIC project accomplishments, with particular emphasis on the relationship of the projects to the incidence of low birth weight. Topics include: the evolution of MIC projects; administration and financing; objectives of the projects; eligibility; coverage of women and infants at risk; quality of care; effects on the use of care and low birth weight; and cost. The difficulties in evaluating these projects is also discussed, including methodological problems and issues of interpretation. A list of references is provided. Tables with information on the projects and evaluations of these projects are provided at the end of the paper.

Keywords: Federal MCH programs, History, Low birthweight infants, Prenatal care, Prevention programs

Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center. 2014. EMS for children: A historical perspective [upd. ed.]. Silver Spring, MD: Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the history of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) for Children -- the national initiative designed to reduce childhood death and disability due to severe illness or injury. The fact sheet describes the legislation behind the EMS program and the larger emergency system of which it is a part, dating back to the Korean and Vietnam Wars. A timeline dating from 1966 through 2014 lists the events leading up the EMS for Children program that have evolved over time. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center, 801 Roeder Road, Suite 600, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 244-6300 Fax: (301) 244-6301 E-mail: emscinformation@childrensnational.org Web Site: http://www.emscnrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Emergency medical services for children, Federal initiatives, History

Genetics in Primary Care Institute. 2014. A toolkit to improve care for pediatric patients with genetic conditions in primary care. Elk Grove Village, IL: Genetics in Primary Care Institute, 73 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit for primary care practices provides information and resources on identifying and caring for children and adolescents with genetic conditions. Topics include collecting family health history, identifying clients with suspected genetic conditions, and providing appropriate and coordinated care for clients with genetic conditions. Contents include action steps, communication tips, and additional resources. Examples from practices who participated in a quality improvement project are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Genetics in Primary Care Institute , National Center for Medical Home Implementation, c/o American Academy of Pediatrics , 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (847) 434-7605 Secondary Telephone: (800) 433-9016, ext. 7605 Web Site: http://geneticsinprimarycare.org/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Children with special health care needs, Genetic counseling, Genetic disorders, Genetic history, Genetic screening, Pediatric care, Program coordination, Service integration

Lombardi J, Mosle A, Patel N, Schumacher R, Stedron J. 2014. Gateways to two generations: The potential for early childhood programs and partnerships to support children and parents together. Washington, DC: Aspen Institute, Ascend, 26 pp.

Annotation: This document explores the two-generation framework, which focuses on creating opportunities for and meeting the needs of vulnerable children and their parents together, and the potential that early childhood development programs have to be gateways for two-generation approaches. Topics include the core components of two-generation approaches (economic supports, education, and social capital); a history of engaging parents in early childhood; the progression of thinking about parents in early childhood development; two-generation approaches in early childhood programs; and state- and community-level initiatives.

Contact: Aspen Institute, One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036-1133, Telephone: (202) 736-5800 Fax: (202) 467-0790 Web Site: http://www.aspeninstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early childhood development, Economic factors, Education factors, History, Intergenerational programs, Local initiatives, Models, Social change, Social factors, Social support, State programs, Young children

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. 2014. Maternal and child health history [upd. ed.]. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource provides access to historical materials, special collections, and legislation and program data related to maternal and child health (MCH) and health services for pregnant women, infants, children, adolescents, and families. The resource focuses on federal programs including activities of the U.S. Children's Bureau and MCH services under Title V of the Social Security Act. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Archives, Data, Federal MCH programs, History, MCH services

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health. 2014. 30 achievements in women's health in 30 years (1984-2014). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 37 pp.

Annotation: This document describes significant achievements in women's health since the establishment of the Department of Health and Human Services' Coordinating Committee on Women's Health in 1984. It also lists other offices on women's health at the federal level, and gives descriptions of agencies and offices related to women's health.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 712E, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (800) 690-7650 Fax: (202) 205-2631 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Anniversaries, Federal agencies, History, Women's health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Maternal and Child Health Bureau. (2013). 25 years of the Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology Program. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; [Rockville, MD]: Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 video (5 min., 42 sec.).

Annotation: This online video reflects on 25 years of the Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology Program (MCHEP). It outlines the building of state, local, tribal, and territorial MCH data and research capacity to improve the health outcomes for women, infants, children, and families.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Children, Families, History, Infants, MCH Epidemiology Program, Women

American Dental Hygienists' Association. 2013. 100 years of dental hygiene. Chicago, IL: American Dental Hygienists' Association, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource presents a chronological history of the dental hygiene profession for the period 1913–2013. Topics include the founding of the dental hygiene profession and association, education, unsupervised practice, preceptorship, the war effort, addressing personnel shortages, accreditation, professional status, publications, legislative focus, and the future of dental hygiene education and practice.

Contact: American Dental Hygienists' Association, 444 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 3400, Chicago, IL 60611, Telephone: (312) 440-8900 Fax: (312) 440-1806 Web Site: http://www.adha.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accreditation, Anniversaries, Associations, Dental hygienists, Dental societies, History, Professional education, Professional societies

Association of Public Health Laboratories. 2013. The newborn screening story: How one simple test changed lives, science, and health in America. Silver Spring, MD: Association of Public Health Laboratories, 95 pp.

Annotation: This book traces the evolution of newborn screening over the last 50 years, with stories from families affected by newborn screening conditions and portraits of the health professionals who support the newborn screening system. Contents include an outline of the origins of newborn screening, health implications of test results and the impact on treatment, the role of science and laboratory testing, how policy contributes to provide newborn screening, and how future screening research, practices, and policies can help improve the survival and growth of newborn infants.

Contact: Association of Public Health Laboratories, 8515 Georgia Avenue, Suite 700 , Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (240) 485-2745 Secondary Telephone: (240) 485-2747 Fax: (240) 485-2700 E-mail: scott.becker@aphl.org Web Site: http://www.aphl.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-9892398-0-6.

Keywords: Congenital abnormalities, History, Infant health, Neonatal mortality, Neonatal screening, Newborn infants

Association of Teachers of Maternal and Child Health. 2013. Developing a repository of excellence in maternal and child health: Past, present, and future voices. Washington, DC Association of Teachers of Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This resource provides materials for instructors and students to use in conducting a Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Oral Histories assignment. It is aimed at introductory and special topic MCH courses. It includes an overview with instructor notes, a PowerPoint teaching lecture, assignment instructions and grading rubrics, interview topic suggestions, a sample interview guide, and an interview release form. Sample oral histories may be added. A link to an archived webinar on the project is included.

Contact: Association of Teachers of Maternal and Child Health, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Ryals 310G, Birmingham, AL 35294-0022, Telephone: (205) 975-0531 Fax: (205) 934-3347 E-mail: jmcdouga@uab.edu Web Site: http://www.atmch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, MCH research, Oral history, Resource materials, Women's health

Briar-Lawson K, McCarthy M, Dickerson N, eds. 2013. The Children's Bureau: Shaping a century of child welfare practices, programs, and policies. Washington, DC: National Association of Social Workers, 342 pp.

Annotation: This book outlines the 100-year history of the Children's Bureau and highlights the ways it has influenced modern-day child welfare practices. Topics include lessons learned, family driven and community-based systems of care, addressing poverty as a child welfare strategy, youth and family engagement, successful transition to adulthood for foster youth, child protection, child maltreatment, social work, tribal and urban Indian child welfare, work force, leadership development, and envisioning the future.

Contact: National Association of Social Workers, 750 First Street, N.E., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20002-4241, Telephone: (202) 408-8600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 742-4089 Fax: E-mail: membership@naswdc.org Web Site: http://www.socialworkers.org $55.99, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-087101-446-7.

Keywords: American Indians, Federal agencies, Child abuse, Child advocacy, Child welfare, Children, Children's Bureau, Families, Foster care, History, Maltreated children, Poverty, Social work, Socioeconomic factors, Transitions, Work force

Connolly CA. 2013. A history of the Commonwealth Fund's child development and preventive care program. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 48 pp.

Annotation: This monograph examines the Commonwealth Fund's recent efforts to create an integrated model of well-child care capable of addressing children's cognitive, emotional, and social development needs. It explores the development of well-child care in the United States in the 20th century, focusing on turning points and emphasizing the fund's initiatives and their contributions to child health care; traces the creation of the fund's Child Development and Preventive Care program and provides an intellectual history of the theories and philosophies informing it; examines how the program built momentum for change, engaged stakeholders, and generated evidence; and analyzes lessons learned from the program and considers them in the context of enduring issues in American society.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Evidence based health care, History, Model programs, National initiatives, Preventive health services, Public private partnerships, Service integration, Well child care

Lieberman A, Nelson K, eds. 2013. Women and children first: The contribution of the Children's Bureau to social work education. Alexandria, VA: Council on Social Work Education, 249 pp.

Annotation: This book focuses on the relationship between the Children’s Bureau and the social work community, a constant since the founding of the Bureau in 1912. It traces the interaction of the Children's Bureau with social work education and practice through scope, policy, and leadership changes, as well as collaboration between the Bureau and schools of social work to develop a dynamic training and technical assistance infrastructure throughout the United States.

Contact: Council on Social Work Education, 1701 Duke Street, Suite 200, Alexandria, VA 22314-3457, Telephone: (703) 683-8080 Fax: (703) 683-8099 E-mail: info@cswe.org Web Site: http://www.cswe.org $46.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-087293-150-3.

Keywords: Child welfare, Children, Children's Bureau, Families, Federal agencies, History, Social work, Work force

Thomas T. 2013. Maternal health from 1985-2013: Hopeful progress and enduring challenges. Chicago, IL: MacArthur Foundation, 17 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides a brief history of the maternal health field, including estimates of the number of women who die in developing countries from complications of pregnancy, abortion attempts, and childbirth; global policies and initiatives; and the manifesto for maternal health post-2015. It also discusses trends in funding for international maternal health and the future of the maternal health field.

Contact: MacArthur Foundation, 140 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, IL 60603, Web Site: http://www.macfound.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Developing countries, History, International health, Maternal health, Maternal morbidity, Maternal mortality

Thomas T. 2013. Two timelines of milestones in maternal health 1985-2013. Chicago, IL: MacArthur Foundation, 9 pp.

Annotation: This paper lists initiatives, policies, social science research, commodities, technologies, and clinical research related to international maternal health between the years 1985 and 2013.

Contact: MacArthur Foundation, 140 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, IL 60603, Web Site: http://www.macfound.org Available from the website.

Keywords: History, International health, Maternal health

Family Voices. [2012]. Getting to know Title V [rev.]. Boston, MA and Albuquerque, NM: Family Voices, 38 pp. (Partnerships: Families and Title V)

Annotation: This booklet provides basic information about maternal and child health (MCH) services funded under Title V of the Social Security Act. The booklet, which is written in large print, presents brief facts about the program's background and history, the federal-state partnership, appropriations, requirements, MCH populations, family-centered care and family involvement, performance and outcome measures, the Title V Block Grant process, and the Title V Information System. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Family Voices, P.O. Box 37188, Albuquerque, NM 87176, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.familyvoices.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Families, Federal MCH programs, History, Social Security Act, Title V, Title V programs

U.S. Children's Bureau. [2012]. The Children's Bureau legacy: Ensuring the right to childhood. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Children's Bureau, 233 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a history of the Children's Bureau from its inception in 1912 to 2012. The document describes the origins of the bureau and follows it through the ensuing century. Topics include the birth of the bureau, saving infants and restoring childhood (1912-1929), the Great Depression and social security (1930-1939), wartime and recovery (1940-1956), a growing government shrinks the bureau (1957-1973), sharpening the focus on child welfare (1974-1992), and partnering with families and working to improve outcomes (1993-2012).

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 9780160917257.

Keywords: Child advocacy, Child health, Child welfare, Children's Bureau, Federal agencies, History

Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology Program. (2012). Celebrating 25 years. [Atlanta, GA]: Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology Program, 1 video (5 min., 42 sec.).

Annotation: This online videorecording presents a reflective journey of 25 years of the federal Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology Program (MCHEP), a collaborative of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau.. It shows how the MCHEP has built state, local, tribal, and territorial MCH capacity to improve the health outcomes for women, infants, children, and families.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology and Statistics Program, Health Resources and Services Administration, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, E-mail: mchesp@altarum.org Web Site: http://mchb.hrsa.gov/researchdata/mchesp/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Health promotion, History, Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology Program

National Healthy Start Association. (2012). Saving our nation's babies: The impact of the federal Healthy Start Initiative (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: National Healthy Start Association, 59 pp.

Annotation: This publication provides an overview of the history of the Healthy Start Initiative for the past 20 years and provides program descriptions for the 105 projects across the country. Topics highlighted include leadership training, regional roundtables, infant mortality, racism/health disparities, and fatherhood involvement.

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Healthy Start, History, Infant health, Infant mortality, Maternal health, Prenatal care, Prevention programs, Program descriptions

Holt K, Barzel R, Bertness J, Lowe B, Kolo S. 2012–. Leadership and legacy: Oral health milestones in maternal and child health. Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center,

Annotation: This timeline presents significant events (milestones) in the United States that have had an impact on the oral health and, ultimately, the overall health and well-being of children, adolescents, women, and families. The milestones are organized by year (from 1840 to the present) and can be viewed using the index page or by selecting a specific year. Contents include background information for each event, its impact, and sources. A companion document highlighting key milestones is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Children, History, Infant, Infant health, Information sources, MCH programs, Oral health, Outcome and process assessment, Public health dentistry, Women's health

Brown LJ, ed. 2012. Special [75th] anniversary issue. Journal of Dental Education 76(1),

Annotation: This issue celebrates the 75th anniversary of the Journal of Dental Education, summarizing the evolution of dental education as a profession and the role of the journal. Topics include the scientific basis for dentistry and its impact on dental education, prevention and its relationship to education, connecting dental education to other health professions, student trends, dental school faculty and the academic environment, changing oral health care needs, new models of dental education and curricular change, community-based dental education, dentists’ learning in practice, pre-doctoral dental education, and information technology and informatics in dental education.

Keywords: Dental education, Dentistry, History, Oral health

Grantmakers in Health. 2012. Medical homes 101. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 4 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This brief provides the 40-year history behind the medical home concept, a team-based health care delivery model led by a physician that provides comprehensive, continuous, and coordinated primary and preventive medical care to patients. The brief discusses the development and expansion of the medical home (also referred to as a health home). the role played in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, and how the model is a catalyst for multiple reform efforts related to health care delivery, reimbursement, and primary care.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Health care reform, Health services delivery, History, Medical home, Primary care, Reimbursement

Hoyert DL. 2012. 75 years of mortality in the United States, 1935-2010. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 7 pp. (NCHS data brief, no. 88)

Annotation: This report examines long-term U.S. mortality trends by age, sex, and race, through 2010 (with preliminary data for 2010). Other topics include overall trends in deaths and risk of dying and heart disease and cancer as leading causes of death.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Death, History, Mortality, Racial factors, Research, Sex factors, Statistics, Trends, Trends

Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured. 2012. Community health centers: The challenge of growing to meet the need for primary care in medically underserved communities. Washington, DC: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 19 pp. (Issue paper)

Annotation: This policy brief presents a profile of community health centers and the patients they serve, describes how health centers are funded, and traces the history of health center growth. It also examines the recent reduction in federal appropriations and state grants for health centers, state cutbacks in benefits for adult Medicaid beneficiaries, and the anticipated impact of President Obama’s FY 2013 request for federal funding for health centers. In conclusion, it looks ahead at the challenges and opportunities for health centers under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The appendix presents a profile of the Northeastern Rural Health Clinics serving patients in northern California.

Contact: Kaiser Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: http://www.kff.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://kff.org/about-kaiser-commission-on-medicaid-and-the-uninsured/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Community health centers, Health care reform, History, Legislation, Policy

Memoli JC, Lorentzen M. 2012. [Fones School of Dental Hygiene] History. Bridgeport, CT: University of Bridgeport, 1 v.

Moehling CM, Thomasson MA. 2012. Saving babies: The contribution of Sheppard-Towner to the decline in infant mortality in the 1920s. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 34 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17996)

Annotation: This paper examines a program that provided matching grants to states to fund maternal and infant care education initiatives and the reduction in infant mortality that occurred in the United States during the early twentieth century. The goal of the paper is to disentangle the effect of the Promotion of the Welfare and Hygiene of Maternity and Infancy Act (more commonly known as the Sheppard-Towner Act) on infant mortality from its preexisting downward trend. The authors assess the impact of Sheppard-Towner grants and public health expenditure measures on infant mortality as well as the impact of specific state activities such as nurse visits, conferences, literature, public health centers, and classes for midwives. Background information on infant mortality and the Children's Bureau, a description of the data and methods, results, and references are included.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website after registration.

Keywords: Federal programs, History, Infant care, Infant mortality, Legislation, Maternal health services, Public health education, Research, State initiatives

Nash DA, Friedman JW, Mathu-Muju KR, Robinson PG, Satur J, Moffat S, Kardos R, Lo ECM, Wong AHH, Jaafar N, van den Heuvel J, Phantumvanit P, Chu EO, Naidu R, Naidoo L, McKenzie I, Fernando E. 2012. A review of the global literature on dental therapists. Battle Creek, MI: W. K. Kellogg Foundation, 460 pp.

Annotation: This monograph reviews literature dating from 1932 and published in the United States that is related to the concept of introducing dental therapists into the work force. The monograph also reviews the experiences of a number of nations where the use of dental therapists could be documented. Topics include history and distribution of dental therapists; education and training; legislation, registration, and licensure; scope of practice and practice settings; oversight, supervision, and safety of care; access to and effectiveness of care; quality of technical care; perspectives of the oral health profession; and perspectives of the public. The monograph concludes with a bibliography.

Contact: W. K. Kellogg Foundation, One Michigan Avenue, East, Battle Creek, MI 49017-4012, Telephone: (269) 968-1611 Fax: (269) 968-0413 Web Site: http://www.wkkf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Children, Dental care, History, International programs, Literature reviews, Oral health, Work force

U.S. Children's Bureau. 2012. Children's Bureau centennial . Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau,

Annotation: This web site celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Children's Bureau, describing its history of addressing issues affecting children and families and setting the stage for the next century. Contents include a timeline of the Children's Bureau's history, numerous documents, videos and audio recordings, links, webinars, photographs, books and articles, as well as conferences and meetings, and logos and widgets.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child health, Child welfare, Children's Bureau, Families, History

U.S. Children's Bureau. 2012. The story of the Children's Bureau. [Washington, DC]: Administration for Children and Families, 39 pp.

Annotation: This book covers the 100-year history of the U.S. Children's Bureau dedicated to the welfare of the nation's children. Topics include involvement in issues such as infant mortality, dependent children, child labor hours and conditions, child abuse and neglect prevention, foster care, and adoption services. Contents include collaboration, assistance to states and tribes, research and data, getting the word out, and leadership. A website also presents the Children's Bureau history. A version of the printed history is also available in Spanish at https://cb100.acf.hhs.gov/sites/all/themes/danland/danblog/files/Story_of_CB_Spanish.pdf.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child abuse, Child labor, Child neglect, Child welfare, Children, Federal agencies, Foster care, History, Infant mortality, Infants, Spanish language materials, U. S. Children's Bureau, Welfare reform, Welfare services

Children's Bureau Express. 2011-2012. Children's Bureau centennial series. Washington, DC: Children's Bureau, 9 items.

Annotation: This website, which celebrates the 100th birthday of the U.S. Children's Bureau, provides links to recent and upcoming issues of the Children's Bureau Express (CBX), which feature a series of short articles about the political climate and social movements prevalent in the early 20th century that laid the groundwork for the creation of the Children's Bureau. CBX covers news, issues, and trends of interest to professionals and policymakers in the interrelated fields of child abuse and neglect, child welfare, and adoption. LInks to other issues of CBX, as well as other related links, are also provided on the site. Users can subscribe to CBX via the website or search past issues.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Anniversaries, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child welfare, Children, Children's Bureau, Federal agencies, History, Public policy

Appalachian State University. 2011. North Carolina nursing history. [Boone, NC]: Appalachian State University,

Annotation: This site provides information on the history of nursing from the Civil War to the present in North Carolina. The web site contains a video and timeline entitled "A Century of Caring." Also provided is an electronic copy of the book by Mary Lewis Wyche entitled "The History of Nursing in North Carolina", published in 1938.

Contact: Appalachian State University, Department of Nursing, ASU Box 32151, Boone, NC 28608-2151, Web Site: http://nursing.appstate.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: History, North Carolina, Nursing, State programs

George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Graduate School of Education and Human Development, and Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning. 2011. Milestones in public health course. Washington, DC: Association of Schools of Public Health,

Annotation: This online course comprises 11 modules based on the 11 chapter topics in the book Milestones in Public Health. The course serves as a tool for teaching undergraduate students, graduate students in public health, and medical and clinical-education students about the major milestones in public health in the United States over the last century. These milestones relate to vaccines and smallpox, automotive safety, environmental health, infectious disease control, cancer, cardiovascular disease, safer and healthier foods, advances in maternal and child health, oral health, addiction, and the U.S. public health infrastructure. The modules work together as part of an overall semester-long course and, in addition, each module can stand alone for inclusion in other courses or for use in both formal and informal teaching situations. Individuals may also use the course for self-guided learning about the public health milestones. The complete course includes instructors’ guides, PowerPoint lectures, faculty-directed case studies, and student directed problem-based learning cases.

Contact: Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health, 1900 M Street, NW, Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-1099 Fax: (202) 296-1252 E-mail: info@aspph.org Contact E-mail: eweist@aspph.org Web Site: http://www.aspph.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, History, Oral health, Professional education, Public health, Public health education, Teaching

National Academy for State Health Policy. 2011. Past, present, and future: A report on state CHIP programs. [Portland, ME]: National Academy for State Health Policy, Multiple items.

Annotation: This Webinar -- presented in January 2011 -- provides a detailed look at states' Children's Health Insurance Programs (CHIP) prior to the passage of the CHIP Reauthorization Act (CHIPRA) and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). It therefore provides a baseline from which to measure changes due to these laws. This webinar highlights progress made in covering children under CHIP and singles out a few of states' accomplishments in implementing provisions of CHIPRA, including Alabama's use of the new citizenship documentation system; Nebraska's implementation of a new oral health coverage provisions; and Colorado's path to receiving a CHIPRA performance bonus. The webinar also focuses on the future of children’s coverage and how states can build on the successes of the CHIP and Medicaid programs to improve coverage and quality for children under the Affordable Care Act.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care reform, History, Measures, Program improvement, State children's health insurance programs, State initiatives

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. 2011. Peter van Dyck archives: Inventory. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 105 pp.

Annotation: This document lists the contents of a set of 30 boxes containing files from the office of Peter van Dyck, Associate Administrator of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, that were provided to the library upon his retirement in 2011. The materials cover MCHB activities from the early 1990's through 2011, and contain publications of various dates. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org

Keywords: Federal MCH programs, Federal agencies: Maternal and Child Health Bureau, History

RCHN Community Health Foundation and George Washington University School of Public Health, Geiger Gibson Program in Community Health Policy. 2011. CHroniCles: The community health center story. New York, NY: RCHN Community Health Foundation,

Annotation: This website documents the history of community health centers (CHCs) through a web-based portal of narratives, photographs, videos, and other materials. Contents include information about the CHC movement and CHC programs, a timeline, and stories and profiles of individual CHCs and primary care associations across the country. The profiles are searchable by name. The site showcases materials from contributors, as well as material developed and recorded especially for the project.

Contact: RCHN Community Health Foundation, 1633 Boradway, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10019, Telephone: (212) 246-1122 x700 E-mail: info@RCHNfoundation.org Web Site: http://www.rchnfoundation.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community health centers, History, Primary care, Web sites

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2011. MCHB presents: Legacy of a leader. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration,

Annotation: This web site contains archived presentations from Dr. Peter Van Dyck, former director of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The presentations, given on July 13, 20, and 27 2011, cover public service pathways as a career choice; the history of maternal and child health (MCH), and lessons in leadership. The presentations are all part of MCHB's Legacy of a Leader series.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child Health, Federal MCH programs, Federal agencies, History, Leadership, Maternal health, Public health

U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps. 2011. History: Commissioned Corps timeline. Washington, DC: U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource presents a timeline of the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, from 1798 to date.

Contact: U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Washington, DC 20852, Telephone: (800) 279-1605 Web Site: https://www.usphs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, History, Oral health, Public health

U.S. Children's Bureau. [2010]. The Children's Bureau: A legacy of service ... a vision for change. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 15 pp.

Annotation: This brochure describes a brief history of the Children's Bureau and presents information about its mission, training and technical assistance, funding, research, monitoring, and special initiatives.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Brochures, Child advocacy, Child health, Child welfare, Federal agencies, History

Wallace HM. [2010]. Martha May Eliot, M.D.. [No place: The author?], 86 pp. (Monograph)

Annotation: This monograph is a memoir of Martha May Eliot, pediatrician and chief of the U.S. Children's Bureau from 1951 to 1957. Based on recollections and personal experiences of the author, the biography describes Dr. Eliot's influence on the field of maternal and child health (MCH) and on federal programs addressing MCH issues. An appendix lists the Martha May Eliot award recipients from the establishment of the award in 1964 though 2010.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: Biographies, Children's Bureau, Eliot, Martha May, Federal MCH programs, History, Pediatricians, Women

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2010. Celebrating the legacy, shaping the future: 75 years of state and federal partnership to improve maternal and child health. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 40 pp.

Annotation: This booklet discusses the Title V maternal and child health (MCH) block grant, which is part of Title V of the Social Security Act. The booklet provides an overview of the block grant (including discussion of what state and territorial program do, what works in improving MCH, and family participation in state and territorial MCH programs); looks back at the history of the block grant; presents an MCH leadership timeline; and discusses challenges, opportunities, and shaping the future. [Funded i part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Anniversaries, Block grants, Child health, Families, History, Leadership, MCH programs, Social Security Act, Title V, State MCH programs, Women's health

CityMatCH. 2010. History, highlights and hope: Shattering the U.S. infant mortality glass ceiling. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH, (Emerging issues in maternal and child health)

Annotation: This website contains an audiorecording and presentation slides from a webinar held on June 17, 2010, to discuss the history of U.S. efforts to reduce infant mortality and what can and should be done to eliminate remaining racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality. It describes some advances and successes in reducing infant mortality; current and emerging science, research, and vision for the future; and the role of local public health and community organizations in infant mortality reduction efforts. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Barriers, Community role, Government role, History, Infant mortality, Local initiatives, Sociocultural factors

Clay K, Troesken W, Haines MR. 2010. Lead, mortality, and productivity. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 62 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 16480)

Annotation: This paper examines the effect of water-borne lead exposure on infant mortality in American cities between 1900 and 1920. The authors compare the type of pipes used (lead, iron, or concrete) in cities and the acidity or softness of the water running through them with levels of infant mortality. The paper provides an overview of lead and infant health based on a review of the literature; discusses the choice in the selection of pipes among public officials; and explains the sources for data used in the study. The authors conclude that cities that used lead pipes in combination with water that promoted lead leaching not only had higher rates of infant mortality, but that the adverse effects may have impacted worker productivity as well. Tables indicate trends in infant mortality, non-infant mortality and worker productivity based on the presence of lead pipes combined with water type. Other tables compare data across cities.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, History, Infant mortality, Lead, Productivity, Research, Water safety

Deavers K, Kavanagh L. 2010. Caring for infants then and now: 1935 to the present. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 24 pp. (Title V 75th Anniversary Celebration)

Annotation: This pamphlet describes recommendations on caring for infants in the Children's Bureau publication titled Infant Care (1935) and in Bright Futures: Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children and Adolescents 2nd ed. (2008), showing how advice from the federal government has remained consistent over time or has changed. Topics include bath time, infant sleep, medical supervision, infant immunizations, preventing illness, injury prevention, breastfeeding, breast milk alternatives, introduction to solid foods, oral health, sun exposure, physical activity, traveling with baby, and role of fathers.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: History, Infant health

Haines MR. 2010. Inequality and infant and childhood mortality in the United States in the twentieth century. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 28 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 16133)

Annotation: This paper examines trends in the United States during the 20th century using infant and childhood mortality as a social indicator of inequality. Using results from multiple surveys, microdata from the 1900 and 1910 Integrated Public Use Microsamples (IPUMS), published data from the Birth Registration Area in the 1920s, and the Linked Birth & Infant Death Files from the National Center for Health Statistics for 1991, the authors explore the relationship between infant and child mortality and variables such as family income, race, ethnicity, residence, occupation of the father or mother, and education of the parents. Tables include indexes indicating rates of child mortality in the United States in 1900 and 1910 according to the occupation of the father; mortality rates according to social class between the years 1895 and 1966; infant mortality rates by race of mother and education of father in 1991; and infant mortality in eight American cities in 1911-1915 according to variables such as the income of the father, the ethnicity of the mother, and whether or not the infant was breastfed.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mortality, Data analysis, Educational factors, Ethnic factors, History, Infant mortality, Racial factors, Research, Social factors, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Trends

Lloyd-Puryear M, Therrell BL. 2010. Newborn screening services: Then and now. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 4 pp. (75 Title V anniversary celebration)

Annotation: This report discusses the history of newborn screening and genetic services in the United States. It discusses the development of the state-based newborn screening programs, highlights conditions for which tests exist, and lists the average number of newborn screening conditions required in United States programs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Genetic screening, History, Neonatal screening, Newborn infants, State MCH programs

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Information Center. 2010. A century of progress: Milestones in sickle cell disease research and care. Bethesda, MD: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Information Center, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure provides an overview of sickle cell disease, explaining what it is and how research has led to advances in its treatment during the past century. The brochure also describes how the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute -- part of the National Institutes of Health -- has not only funded sickle cell research but has conducted large clinical trials and sponsored workshops and meetings to guide the research agenda. The back of the brochure is a time line displaying events related to sickle cell disease beginning in 1910 when it was first described by Chicago Physician James B. Herrick.

Contact: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Information Center, P.O. Box 30105, Bethesda, MD 20824-0105, Telephone: (301) 592-8573 Secondary Telephone: (240) 629-3255 Fax: (301) 592-8563 E-mail: NHLBIinfo@nhlbi.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/infoctr/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Blood and lymphatic disease, Genetics, History, Medical research, Sickle cell disease

Singh GK. 2010. Child mortality in the United States, 1935-2007: Large racial and socioeconomic disparities have persisted over time. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 8 pp. (75 Title V anniversary celebration)

Annotation: This report analyzes long-term trends in mortality among children and adolescents ages 1-4 and ages 5-14 in the United States from 1935 through 2007. The authors consider race and ethnicity, sex, cause of death, family poverty level, and state of residence and use both historical and the latest nations vital statistics data. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mortality, Cause of death , Child mortality, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Families, Geographic factors, Health status disparities, History, Poverty, Racial factors, Statistical data, Trends

Singh GK. 2010. Maternal mortality in the United States, 1935-2007: Substantial racial/ethnic, socioeconomic, and geographic disparities persist. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 10 pp. (75 Title V anniversary celebration)

Annotation: This report analyzes trends in U.S. maternal mortality for the years from 1935 through 2007. The report analyzes the data according to race/ethnicity, socioeconomic position (family poverty level), and state and region of residence by using both historical and the latest national vital statistics data. The report points out the racial, socioeconomic and regional disparities that remain despite the massive drop in maternal mortality over the long ter,. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Geographic factors, Health status disparities, History, Maternal mortality, Racial factors, Reports, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical analysis, Statistics, Trends

Singh GK. 2010. Youth mortality in the United States, 1935-2007: Large and persistent disparities in injury and violent deaths. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 10 pp. (75 Title V anniversary celebration)

Annotation: This report analyzes trends in U.S. mortality rates among adolescents and young adults (ages 15 to 24) during the years from 1935 through 2007. The report analyzes the data according to sex, race/ethnicity, state of residence, and cause of death by using both historical and the latest national vital statistics data. Topics covered include the leading causes of youth mortality; disparities in mortality trends; and trends in youth mortality from unintentional injuries, homicide, suicide, and HIV/AIDS. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mortality, Adolescents, Data, Health status disparities, History, Injury, Mortality rates, Reports, Statistical analysis, Statistics, Trends, Violence, Youth

Singh GK, Van Dyck PC. 2010. Infant mortality in the United States, 1935-2007: Over seven decades of progress and disparities. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 8 pp. (75 Title V anniversary celebration)

Annotation: This report, which focuses on infant mortality in the United States from 1935 to 2007, discusses trends in infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality by race; trends in infant mortality by birthweight, length of gestation, and maternal age; and leading causes of infant death. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Health status disparities, Age factors, History, Infant death, Infant mortality, Low birthweight, Pregnancy, Racial factors, Trends

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2010. Title V Social Security Act: Honoring our past, celebrating our future—75 celebrate. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 DVD.

Annotation: This video recording was produced to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Title V Maternal and Child Health Services block grant. It includes an introduction to Title V of the Social Security Act by Peter Van Dyck, Associate Administration of Maternal & Child Health, U.S. Department of Health, together with vignettes from providers and recipients of Title V programs such as Family Voices, Baltimore Healthy Start, and Bright Beginnings.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov

Keywords: MCH programs, Anniversaries, Block grants, Federal initiatives, History, MCH services, Social Security Act, Title V

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2010. Title V Social Security Act: Honoring our past, celebrating our future—75 celebrate. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 10 items.

Annotation: This packet of materials was prepared for the Maternal and Child Health Federal/State Partnership Meeting,October 20, 2010. It contains these documents: (1) Locating the Future in the Past: A History of Maternal and Child Health Programs in the U.S. by Jeffrey Brosco; (2) Rethinking MCH: The Life Course Model as an Organizing Framework--Concept Paper by MCHB;(3) Caring for Infants Then and Now: 1935 to the Present, by Kimberly Deavers and Laura Kavanagh; (4) Maternal Mortality in the United States, 1935-2007: Substantial Racial/Ethnic, Socioeconomic and Geographic Disparities Persist, by Gopal Singh; (5) Infant Mortality in the United States, 1935-2007: Over Seven Decades of Progress and Disparities, by Gopal Singh and Peter van Dyck; (6) Child Mortality in the United States, 1935-2007: Large Racial and Socioeconomic Disparities Have Persisted Over Time, by Gopal Singh; (7) Youth Mortalaity in the United States, 1935-2007: Large and Persistent Disparities in Injury and Violent Deaths, by Gopal Singh; (8) Childhood Obesity in the United States, 1976-2008: Trends and Current Racial/Ethnic, Socioeconomic and Georgraphic Disparities, by Gopal Kingh and Michael Kogan; (9) Newborn Screening Services: Then and Now, by Michele Lloyd-Puryear and Bradford Therrell Jr.; and (10) 75 Celebrate, by MCHB.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov

Keywords: MCH programs, Maternal mortality, Adolescent mortality, Anniversaries, Block grants, Child mortality, Children, Conference proceedings, History, Infant mortality, Infants, Life course, MCH services, Neonatal screening, Obesity, Social Security Act, Title V, Women

Weissman G, Mitchell M, eds. 2010. Celebrate 2010: A decade of progress for children and youth with special health care needs. Boston, MA: Catalyst Center, 91 pp.

Annotation: This book is designed to serve as a commemorative reflection on the Maternal and Child Health Bureau's efforts between 2000-2010 to achieve a community-based system of services for all children and youth with special needs. The book offers an overview of family professional partnerships; looks at early and continuous screening efforts; addresses health insurance and financing; and discusses the evolution of the medical home and community-based services. The transition from childhood to adulthood is also addressed. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Catalyst Center, the National Center for Health Insurance and Financing for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs, Boston University School of Public Health, Center for Advancing Health Policy and Practice, 801 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, MA 02218-2526, Telephone: (617) 638-1930 E-mail: mcomeau@bu.edu Web Site: http://cahpp.org/project/the-catalyst-center Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Community-based services, Federal MCH programs, Health care systems, History

Yarrow AL. 2009. History of U.S. children's policy, 1900-present. Washington, DC: First Focus, 30 pp.

Annotation: This publication surveys federal legislative, executive branch, and judicial actions impacting America's children, from the early 20th century to the first month of the Obama Administration. Topics include issues of child welfare, education, child nutrition, child and family health, children's rights, and White House conferences.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children's Bureau, Families, Federal MCH programs, Federal initiatives, Federal legislation, History, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Maternal health, National programs, Public policy, Social services

Library of Congress, John W. Kluge Center. 2007. Justice, not pity: Julia Lathrop, First Chief of the U.S. Children's Bureau. Washington, DC: Library of Congress, John W. Kluge Center,

Annotation: This audio recording and transcript features Dr. Cecilia Tichi, Chair of Modern Culture in the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress presenting a history of Julia Lathrop, the first chief of the U.S. Children's Bureau. The talk -- titled Justice, Not Pity, is taken from Lathrop's quote, The justice of today is born of yesterday's pity -- highlights Lathrop's upbringing and educational background; her interest in social democracy and reform; and her work at Hull House -- a settlement house in Chicago. The recording and transcript include descriptions of numerous slides used during the presentation that took place in September 2007.

Contact: Library of Congress, Government Documents Section, 101 Independence Avenue at First Street, S.E., Washington, DC 20540, Telephone: (202) 707-5000 Fax: (202) 707-0380 E-mail: http://www.loc.gov/rr/aslalib/ Web Site: http://www.loc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Federal agencies, History, Maternal health, Reform, Social change

van Dyck, PC. 2007. MCHB history, vision, mission, strategic plan, and MCHB partnership of investment. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau,

Annotation: This presentation was given at the new leaders meeting of the 2007 MCHB federal/state partnership meeting held Octover 14-17 in Alexandria, VA. It presents an overview of Title V philosophy, legislation, operations, and history. A 50-minute video, slides, and a text-only transcript are available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal MCH programs, History, Social Security Act, Title V, Title V programs

Aber L, Bishop-Josef SJ, Jones SM, McLearn KT, Phillips DA, eds. 2006. Child development and social policy: Knowledge for action. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, 311 pp.

Annotation: This book focuses on both the influence of social policy on children's development and the unique perspective, insight, and skills that developmentalists bring to this policy and its formation. Programs to ensure good beginnings for all children are discussed, while the needs of those who are most vulnerable are also addressed. The book contains 16 chapters, divided into four sections that also include a brief history of child development and social policy as well as strengthening children, families, and communities. Additional information is provided on the contributors, an epilogue entitled "Combining basic and applied science in constructing sound social policy"; and an author and a subject index.

Contact: American Psychological Association, 750 First Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20002-4242, Telephone: (202) 336-5500 Secondary Telephone: (800) 374-2721 Fax: (202) 336-6069 E-mail: mis@apa.org Web Site: http://www.apa.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN-10 1-59147-425-6; ISBN-13 978-1-59147-425-8.

Keywords: Child development, Children, History, Policy development, Social policy

Center for Mental Health in Schools. 2006. The current status of mental health in schools: A policy and practice analysis. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, 96 pp. (A center policy report)

Annotation: This report offers further clarification of policy implications for advancing mental health in schools by briefly reflecting on what school have been and are doing about mental health concerns and exploring emerging trends. Part one outlines the last 50 years, federal support for mental health in schools, collaboration efforts, and the role of school professionals involved with mental health and psychosocial concerns. Part two reviews the need from the school's perspective, broadening the understanding of "mental health", funding, marginalization, and addresses the key policy problem. The third part identifies where the field is going in school and the transformation of the mental health system in the U.S. as well as connecting with school improvement planning. The final part addresses policy implications in ending the marginalization of mental health in policy considerations and encouraging policy action. Appendices include recommendations, guidelines, and examples. Exhibits provide illustrations throughout the report. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Health policy, History, Mental health, Mental health services, School age children, School health services, Trends

Clay K, Troesken W, Haines M. 2006. Lead pipes and child mortality. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 39 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 12603)

Annotation: This paper uses national data from the public use sample of the 1900 Census of Population and data on city use of lead pipes in 1897 to estimate the effect of lead pipes on child mortality. The paper, which includes an abstract, introduces the issue and discusses the use of lead pipes, lead poisoning, child mortality in the 1900 and 1910 censuses, and the effect of lead pipes on child mortality. A conclusion and references are included. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables grouped together at the end of the report.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mortality, History, Lead, Lead poisoning

Pfizer. 2006. Milestones in public health: Accomplishments in public health over the last 100 years. New York, NY: Pfizer, 275 pp.

Annotation: This book provides an overview of milestones in public health during the last century in the United States. The milestones discussed are those identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They are advances in (1) addiction, (2) automotive safety, (3) cancer, (4) cardiovascular disease, (5) environmental and occupational health, (6) food safety, (7) infectious disease control, (8) maternal and child health, (9) oral health, and (10) vaccines. One chapter in the book is devoted to each milestone. Each chapter is written by a different expert, and each explores historical developments related to the milestone and presents a case study of the milestone and a vignette illustrating another facet of the milestone. Predictions of advances still to come are offered, as well. The book includes a prologue, an epilogue, and references. Also available as a course.

Contact: Pfizer, 235 East 42nd Street, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 733-2323 Web Site: http://www.pfizer.com/home Available from the website.

Keywords: Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Child health, Children, Communicable disease control, Distance education, Drug addiction, Environmental health, Food safety, History, Infants, Motor vehicle safety, Occupational safety and health, Oral health, Parents, Public health, Vaccines, Women's health

Rosenbaum S, Mauery DR, Shin P, Hidlago J. [2005]. National security and U.S. child health policy: The origins and continuing role of Medicaid and EPSDT. Washington, DC: George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, Department of Health Policy, 13 pp. (Policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief begins with an overview of Medicaid and child health, examining both the program's early eligibility structure as well as the advent of Medicaid's special benefit for children, the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) program. The brief then describes the findings from a pivotal 1964 study that influenced Medicaid's child health policy: One Third of a Nation: A Report of Young Men Found Unfit for Military Service. The brief concludes with a discussion of the continued relevance of this history to Medicaid reform. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. The report includes one appendix: statistical methods for calculating the proportion of military recruits who may have been covered by Medicaid at some point in their lives prior to recruitment.

Contact: George Washington University, Center for Health Policy Research, 2021 K Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20006, Telephone: (202) 994-4100 Fax: (202) 994-4040 E-mail: info@gwhealthpolicy.org Web Site: http://publichealth.gwu.edu/projects/center-health-policy-research Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, EPSDT, Eligibility, Federal programs, History, Low income groups, Medicaid, Public policy, Uninsured persons

Baker JP, Pearson HA, eds. 2005. Dedicated to the health of all children. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 213 pp.

Annotation: This book, which was commissioned by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) to commemorate its 75th anniversary, recounts many of the major child health issues and pediatric advances, primarily of the past century. The first five chapters are divided chronologically by era, starting with colonial times. Chapter 6 describes selected advances in pediatrics. Chapter 7 presents physicians' anecdotes from the past 75 years. Chapter 8 looks ahead to child health in the 21st century. The book contains a large selection of color photographs. The book includes one appendix -- a list of AAP presidents. Selected readings, photo credits, and an index are also included.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $75.00, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 1-58110-140-6.

Keywords: American Academy of Pediatrics, Anniversaries, Child health, History, Infant health, Pediatricians, Professional societies

Lippman L. 2005. Indicators and indices of child well-being: A brief history. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 15 pp. (KIDS COUNT working paper)

Annotation: This working paper provides a brief history of indicators and indices of child well-being in the United States, beginning in the 1960s and continuing through 2003. References are included.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, Kids Count, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 Web Site: http://www.aecf.org/MajorInitiatives/KIDSCOUNT.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, History, Social indicators

Smuts AB. 2005. Science in the service of children, 1893-1935. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 381 pp.

Annotation: This book explores the history of the founding and progress of the field of child development from the late 1800s up to World War II. Topics in part one of the book, encompassing 1893-1910, include the rise of social research, feminism, the child study movement, scientific child rearing, parent education, social welfare reform and reform-minded scientsts. Part two provides an overview of the creation of models from 1910-1921. Contents include the establishment of the Children's Bureau, research perspectives from juvenile delinquency to child guidance, and a case study of the methods used in the Iowa Child Welfare Research Station to grow better crops, better pigs, and better children. The third section reviews breakthroughs during the period from 1922 to 1940. It discusses the "Children's Decade" of the 1920s, child development research and preventive politics, a case study of the Yale Clinic, activities of the Child Guidance Movement and its transformation to child psychiatry, and the continued activities of the Children's Bureau.

Contact: Yale University Press, P.O. Box 209040, New Haven, CT 06520-9040, Telephone: (203) 432-0960 Fax: (203) 432-0948 Web Site: http://yalepress.yale.edu/yupbooks/home.asp $32.00 for paperback, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 9780300144352.

Keywords: Behavioral sciences, Biological sciences, Child development, Child health, Child health programs, Child rearing, Children, Children's Bureau, Federal agencies, History, Mother child relations, Mothers, Parent education, Pediatrics, Social sciences, United States

American College of Dentists. [2004]. Dental history: Multimedia dental history resource. [Gaithersburg, MD]: American College of Dentists,

Annotation: This resource is a downloadable program for Windows computers that discusses the history of dentistry from earliest times to the present. Content consists primarily of published articles; excerpts of published compilations or works; original material assembled for the resource; and images. Six self-assessment tests are also included. Audio and video clips augment textual material and images. The program is divided into eight historical sections with further subsections. The sections include the following: introduction, early times (BCE to 800 CE). Medieval (800 to 1400), Renaissance (1400-1600), Colonial (1600-1800), Industrial (1800-1900), and Modern (1900 and later).

Contact: American College of Dentists, Executive Office American College of Dentists, 839J Quince Orchard Boulevard, Gaithersburg, MD 20878-1614, Telephone: (301) 977-3223 Fax: (301) 977-3330 E-mail: info@facd.org Web Site: http://www.acd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Dentistry, Distance education, Educational materials, History, Multimedia, Oral health

Golden J, Meckel RA, Prescott HM. 2004. Children and youth in sickness and in health: A historical handbook and guide. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 242 pp. (Children and youth: History and culture)

Annotation: This book provides a historical overview of the major issues in infant, child, and adolescent health in the United States from the colonial period through the 21st century. The book is composed of three parts. Part 1 consists of six original essays exploring different topics in infant, child, and adolescent health. Part 2 provides a selection of primary sources grouped into six categories: (1) recounting health and illness, (2) advice on child health, (3) images of child health, (4) institutions for child health, (5) mental hygiene, and (6) child health and the state. Part 3 consists of a bibliography of secondary sources. The book includes an index.

Contact: Greenwood Publishing Group, Customer Service Department, 130 Cremona Drive , Santa Barbara, CA 93117, Telephone: (805) 968-1911 E-mail: customer-service@greenwood.com Web Site: http://www.greenwood.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-313-33041-7.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, History, Infant health, Mental health, Trends

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2004. Abstinence education special Congressional initiative (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance CFDA no. 93.888): Program guidance for summary progress report for non-competing expansion grant proposals. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 40 pp.

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2004. Abstinence education special Congressional initiative project grants (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance CFDA no. 93.888): Program guidance announcement. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 76 pp.

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2004. SPRANS community-based abstinence education project grants, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance CFDA NO.93.110: Program guidance for non-competing continuation grant proposals. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 65 pp.

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2004. The Special Projects of Regional and National Significance Community-based Abstinence Education Program: 2001 grantees' annual summary. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 20 pp.

Costa DL. 2003. Race and pregnancy outcomes in the twentieth century: A long-term comparison. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 33 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 9593)

Annotation: This paper documents the differential 20th century trends in black and white pregnancy outcomes and examines what socioeconomic and maternal health factors explained these differentials in past and recent times. Sections include a 20th century history of producing healthy babies; a description of the records from Johns Hopkins University (JHU), spanning the years 1897 to 1935, that were used in the survey along with data from the 1988 National Maternal and Infant Health Survey (NMIHS); pregnancy outcome trends; the empirical framework; birth outcomes and race at JHU and in 1988; and conclusions. Topics include the historic roles played by sexually transmitted diseases, breastfeeding, marriage rates, socioeconomic factors, nutrition disorders, and other lifestyle differences between blacks and whites. An appendix discusses the nature of data used in the research. References are provided. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures grouped at the end of the paper.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Breastfeeding, Economic factors, History, Infant health, Infant mortality, Infant mortality, Lifestyle, Nutrition disorders, Pregnancy outcome, Racial factors, Research, Sexually transmitted diseases, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Surveys, Trends, Whites, Women's health

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2003. 2003 continuation application guidance for Special Projects of Regional and National Significance Community-Based Abstinence Education CFDA #93.110. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 85 pp.

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2003. Application guidance for abstinence education special initiatives. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 79 pp.

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2003. Application guidance for Special Projects of Regional and National Significance Community-Based Abstinence Education CFDA #93.110. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 93 pp.

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2003. SPRANS community-based abstinence education project grants, HRSA-04-077, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance CFDA NO.93.110: Program guidance competing announcement. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 81 pp.

Alexander GR, Chadwick C, Petersen DJ, Pass M, Slay M, Shumpaert N. [2002]. Maternal and child health/public health milestones. Birmingham, AL: University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Maternal and Child Health, 71 pp., 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: This PowerPoint presentation presents maternal and child health (MCH) milestones from 1792 through the present. It is divided into 12 parts. Each of the first 11 parts focuses on a particular time period beginning with 1792 through 1899 and ending with 1990 through the present. Part 12 presents the philosophy of MCH. It was presented at an MCH Leadership Skills Training Institute. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Maternal and Child Health, RPHB 320, 1530 Third Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294-0022, Telephone: (205) 934-7161 Fax: (205) 934-8248 Contact E-mail: alexanderg@uab.edu

Keywords: CD-ROMs, Child health, History, Maternal health, Public health

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2002, 2003. Application guidance for Section 510 of Title V of the Social Security Act fiscal year 2003. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, v.

Elshtain JB. 2002. Jane Addams and the dream of American democracy: A life. New York, NY: Basic Books, 329 pp.

Annotation: This book is a biography of Jane Addams (1880-1935) -- a public intellectual who focused on issues of concern to mothers and children, including public health, women's suffrage, child labor, and the importance of play in the lives of children and youth. It describes how Addams' background influenced her social service work; how she founded Hull House -- a social settlement house in Chicago for recent immigrants of European descent -- and how her philosophy and life's work had a lasting impact on American culture. The book includes a list of major accomplishments of Hull House.

Contact: Basic Books, Perseus Books Group, 387 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (212) 340-8164 E-mail: perseus.promos@perseusbooks.com Web Site: http://www.perseusbooksgroup.com/basic/home.jsp $17.82, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-0465-01913-7.

Keywords: Biographies, Children, Cultural sensitivity, Feminism, History, Immigrants, Mothers, Public health services, Social change, Social conditions

Greenberg SJ, Gallagher PE, comps. 2002. History of health sciences. (2nd rev. ed.). Chicago, IL: Medical Library Association, 142 pp. (MLA BibKit no. 5)

Annotation: This book is designed for librarians and their patrons and is divided into four chapters. Chapter one includes descriptions of 20 important bibliographic sources that make up a ready reference shelf on the history of the health sciences for the frontline public services librarian. Chapters two and three include descriptions of 150 primary sources and 120 secondary sources in the history of the health sciences. Chapter 4 includes Web links to sites related to the history of the health sciences. A 3-1/2 inch diskette is also included.

Contact: Medical Library Association, 65 East Wacker Place, Suite 1900, Chicago, IL 60601-7246, Telephone: (312) 419-9094 Fax: (312) 419-8950 E-mail: info@mlahq.org Web Site: http://www.mlanet.org/ $27.00, includes shipping and handling.

Keywords: Health sciences libraries, History, Library services, Medicine, Reference materials, Resources for professionals

Schneider A, Elias R, Garfield R, Rousseau D, Wachin V. 2002. The Medicaid resource book. Washington, DC: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 215 pp.

Annotation: This resource book is designed to serve as a comprehensive guide to the Medicaid program. It is an analytic tool that provides information on who the program serves, the services it offers, and how it is funded and administered. The book is divided into four chapters that reflect the four major dimensions of the Medicaid program: eligibility, benefits, financing, and administration. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the book. The book also contains a glossary and five appendices covering the legislative history of the Medicaid program, indexes to the Medicaid statute and Medicaid regulations, a list of resources from the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the uninsured, and a list of Internet resources. An index is provided.

Contact: Kaiser Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: http://www.kff.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://kff.org/about-kaiser-commission-on-medicaid-and-the-uninsured/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Administration, Eligibility, Financing, History, Internet, Medicaid, Regulations, Resource materials, Uninsured persons

Stern AM, Markel H, eds. 2002. Formative years: Children's health in the United States, 1880-2000. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, 304 pp.

Annotation: This book consists of a collection of essays on topics related to the history of child health in the United States from 1880 to 2000. The book is divided into three parts: (1) pediatrics as a subspecialty, (2) standardizing the child, and (3) discovering new diseases in children. Each part comprises several essays. Essay topics include the origins of scientific pediatrics, the relationship between public health workers and pediatricians, technology, pediatricians as experts in child health, eugenics in the Midwest, adolescent growth and development, school diseases in the late 19th century, juvenile diabetes and the origins of managerial medicine, the discovery of child sexual abuse in America, and fetal alcohol syndrome in the late 20th century. A bibliography, a list of suggested reading, and an index are included.

Contact: University of Michigan Press, 839 Greene Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48104-3209, Telephone: (734) 764-4388 Fax: (734) 615-1540 Web Site: http://www.press.umich.edu $60.00, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 0-472-11268-6.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Child health, Child sexual abuse, Diabetes mellitus, Fetal alcohol syndrome, History, Pediatricians, Pediatrics, Public health, School health, Technology

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health. 2002. A century of women's health: 1900-2000. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 45 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an overview of women's health during the past 100 years. The report, which includes a summary, is divided into the following chapters: (1) social and cultural factors, (2) preventive health, (3) quality of life, (4) diagnosis and treatment, (5) health education and communications, and 6) body image and health. Two appendices contain women's health events of the 20th century and Department of Health and Human Services women's time capsule items ( a list of items that could be placed in a time capsule for the information of women of the future). References are included.

Contact: National Women's Health Information Center, 8270 Willow Oaks Corporate Drive, Fairfax, VA 22031, Telephone: (800) 994-9662 Secondary Telephone: (888) 220-5446 Fax: (703) 560-6598 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Cultural factors, Diagnosis, Health education, History, Prevention, Social factors, Treatment, Women's health

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2002. Continuation application guidance for the Special Projects of Regional and National Significance Community-Based Abstinence Education Program CFDA #93.100NO. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 66 pp.

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2001?. Application guidance for Special Projects of Regional and National Significance Community-Based Abstinence Education under Title V of the Social Security Act. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 74 pp.

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2001 or 2002. Application guidance for Special Projects of Regional and National Significance Community-Based Abstinence Education under Title V of the Social Security Act CFDA #93.100NO. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 81 pp.

Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality. 2001. Recommendations on the future of the Healthy Start Initiative: Final report to Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [Bethesda, MD]: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 13 pp.

Annotation: This final report summarizes the first ten years of the Healthy Start program to reduce infant mortality and improve the health status of pregnant women and infants, and provides recommendations for the future of the Healthy Start Initiative. The report provides details on recommendations to (1) broaden the focus of the program to include maternal and infant mortality and morbidity with a focus on reducing racial disparities; (2) guide the program to provide a framework for community initiatives that are supported by evidence-based intervenions and focus greater attention of integration of services; (3) assure that local Healthy Start grants are closely aligned with State Title V MCH Block Grant programs; and (4) demonstrate accountability by participating in the State/Federal Performance Measurement System and enhancing key state and national data systems to monitor progress.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Program improvement, Federal programs, Healthy Start, History, Infant health, Infant mortality, Maternal health, Prenatal care, Prevention programs

Albrecht GL, Seelman KD, Bury M, eds. 2001. Handbook of disability studies. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 852 pp.

Annotation: This book, which is aimed at academics, people with disabilities, and those interested in forming social welfare policies, focuses on issues and debated framing disability studies and places the studies in a historical and cultural context. The book is divided into three sections, each representing an overarching theme: the shaping of disability studies as a field (Part 1), experiencing disability (Part 2), and disability in context (part 3). The parts are divided into chapters, each of which includes an overview, a conclusion, notes, and references. The book also includes an author index, a subject index, and an about the contributors section.

Contact: Sage Publications, 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-2218, Telephone: (805) 499-9774 Secondary Telephone: (800)818-7243 Fax: (805) 499-0871 E-mail: order@sagepub.com Web Site: http://www.sagepub.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-7619-2874-X.

Keywords: Advocacy, Cultural factors, Disabilities, Education, Health personnel, History, Human rights, Public health, Public policy, Research, Social conditions, Social support, Trends

Hutchins VL. 2001. Maternal and child health at the millennium: Looking back, moving forward. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 62 pp.

Annotation: This publication provides an overview of the federal Maternal and Child Health (MCH) program's evolution in consultation, technical assistance, policy development and dissemination, and data collection and analysis, from the establishment of the Children's Bureau in 1912 to the present. The publication uses four selected areas—newborn screening, mental retardation, heart disease, and school health/health of school age children—to illustrate how the MCH program development principles have incorporated scientific and technological advances into promoting the health of the nation's children and families. The publication discusses the problems that the MCH program will face in the future, including unresolved problems from the 20th century and new problems. References are included in the document. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child health, Children, Children's Bureau, Families, Fathers, Health promotion, Healthy People 2010, Heart diseases, History, Infants, MCH programs, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Mental retardation, Neonatal screening, Parents, Pregnant women, Program development, School age children, School health, Social Security Act, Title V, Title V programs

Peoples-Sheps MD, Alexander GR, comps. 2001. Landmark federal MCH legislation. Washington, DC: Delta Omega, ca. 75 pp.

Annotation: This document contains an introduction that summarizes the history of important federal maternal and child health (MCH) legislation, and the text of federal laws from P.L. 61-116, which established the Children's Bureau in 1912, through P.L. 104-193, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act of 1996, which established an abstinence education program.

Contact: Delta Omega, 1101 15th Street, N.W., Suite 910, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-1099 ext. 127 Fax: (202) 296-1252 E-mail: afoster@asph.org Web Site: http://www.deltaomega.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Federal MCH programs, Federal legislation, History, Maternal health

Rosenbaum S, Proser M, Sonosky C. 2001. Health policy and early child development: An overview. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report is designed to provide an introduction to federal health policy related to early childhood development, as well as an overview of statistics on health insurance coverage for young children and certain program-specific data. The report focuses on those programs that have, as a major policy, the financing and provision of preventive health care for infants and young children. Topics include the evolution of federal health policy on early child development; health insurance for young children; and the federal role in promoting access to health care for medically underserved young children. The report contains figures and tables illustrating statistics on child participation in health insurance programs and Medicaid; federal roles; insurance coverage; and federal budget allocations.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Health insurance, Health policy, History, Title V programs

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2001. Celebrating 65 years of Title V: The Maternal and Child Health program 1935-2000—A review of federal appropriations and allocations to states for maternal and child health programs under Title V of the Social Security Act. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 143 pp., 1 sticker.

Annotation: This report reviews the federal appropriations and allocations to states and territories for Maternal and Child Health (MCH) programs funded by Title V of the Social Security Act for FY1936-FY2001. An historical background and a section on trends in MCH appropriations, 1936-2000, introduce the document. The appendix includes data on Title V and MCH block grants, nationally and for each state or territory. A sticker (NMCHC inv. code N045) showing the title of this report is included. This volume is an update of 50 Years of U.S. Federal Support to Promote the Health of Mothers, Children and Handicapped Children in America 1935-1985, prepared by the Information Sciences Research Institute through support by HRSA grant MCJ-240459. A poster is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Anniversaries, Anniversaries, Child health, Children, Families, Federal MCH programs, Health care financing, History, Maternal health, Oral Health, Social Security Act, Title V, Statistics

Wysen K, Curtis D. 2001. A coordination challenge for states: A snapshot of major federal programs for children. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 26 pp.

Annotation: This paper documents the fragmentation in the provision of children's services that results from the large number of agencies and organizations involved, reviews the historical context that has contributed to the current division of responsibilities, and summarizes several innovative strategies various states have taken to deliver a coordinated continuum of services. Contents include a review of the current state of child health, early childhood care and education, family support and child welfare, child nutrition, and income assistance. It outlines problems with the categorical maze of services and programs; asks how did we get here?; and describes strategies for providing coordinated services including program-centered, policy-centered, and organizationally-centered integration, and statewide community-based initiatives. The appendices offer information of federal program eligibility under different scenarios and a chronology of children's programs.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org $10.00, includes shipping and handling.

Keywords: Child care, Child development services, Child health services, Child welfare, Community based services, Family support services, Federal programs, History, Program descriptions, Service coordination, Service integration, State programs

Berinstein P. 2000. Finding statistics online: How to locate the elusive numbers you need [2nd Ed]. Medford, NJ: Information Today, 356 pp.

Annotation: This book is intended as both a how-to-do-it text and a desktop reference. Chapter 2 and the glossary of statistical terms provide information on understanding and using statistics. The book shows how to effectively search the Internet and professional online services for needed numbers. It discusses where and how to start searching, important systems and sources, and how to evaluate data for reliability. Chapters 5 through 18 discuss how to find statistics on demographics and population; industry, market, and general business; finance and economics; health and medicine; science, agriculture, and the environment; history; public opinion and trends; politics and government; sports, entertainment, and the arts; the law and crime; international issues; technology; education; and transportation.

Contact: Information Today, 143 Old Marlton Pike, Medford, NJ 08055-8750, Telephone: (609) 654-6266 Secondary Telephone: (800) 300-9868 Fax: (609) 654-4309 E-mail: custserv@infotoday.com Web Site: http://www.infotoday.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0910965250.

Keywords: Art, Business, Crime, Demography, Economics, Education, Environment, Government, Health, History, Industry, Internet, Medicine, Political processes, Public opinion, Sports, Statistics, Technology, Transportation, Vital statistics

Children's Partnership. 2000. America's children in the 21st century. Santa Monica, CA: Children's Partnership, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report describes improvements in services and opportunities to underserved children in the digital economy and health care system, and the expansion of child advocacy to new issues and audiences. It also summarizes policy milestones that changed American and its families from 1900 to 2000 such as universal public education and child labor laws.

Contact: Children's Partnership, 1351 Third Street Promenade, Suite 206, Santa Monica, CA 90401-1321, Telephone: (310) 260-1220 Fax: (310) 260-1921 E-mail: frontdoor@childrenspartnership.org Web Site: http://www.childrenspartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child advocacy, Child development, Child health, History

Cunningham PJ, Park MH. 2000. Tracking recent changes in health coverage for low-income children with the Community Tracking Study, 1996-1997 and 1998-1999. Washington, DC: Center for Studying Health System Change, 27 pp. (Research report: no. 4)

Annotation: This report describes the methods of the Community Tracking Study, changes in coverage that were identified between the two surveys, and factors that may cause these changes.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community surveys, Health insurance, History, Low income groups, Medicaid, State Children's Health Insurance Program, Uninsured persons

Teaching Tolerance. 2000. A place at the table: Struggles for equality in America. Montgomery, AL: Teaching Tolerance, 1 videotape (40 minutes, VHS 31/2 inch), 1 teaching guide (28 pp.), 1 book (144 pp.).

Annotation: This package, recommended for grades 8 and above, includes a documentary film exploring the historical struggle for equality through the eyes of today's young people, as well as an illustrated text and a teacher's guide. Eight adolescents tell stories about their own struggle as well as their ancestors' struggle with racial and sexual orientation-related discrimination. Topics include religious freedom; slavery, segregation, the Fugitive Slave Law; Native American's right to their ancestral home; immigrant laborers' struggles to obtain a fair days wage for a fair days work; suffrage; gender inequity in school sports; unjust laws aimed at immigrants of Japanese ancestry; and disability rights. The text concludes with suggestions for additional reading. The teacher's guide includes 13 detailed lesson plans to be used in conjunction with the text and the video.

Contact: Teaching Tolerance, c/o Southern Poverty Law Center , 400 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104, Telephone: (334) 956-8200 Fax: (334) 956-8488 E-mail: http://www.tolerance.org/contact-us Web Site: http://www.tolerance.org/ Available in libraries.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Cultural factors, Discrimination, Educational materials, Equal opportunities, Ethnic factors, History, Homosexuality, Racial factors, Tolerance, Videotapes, Women's rights

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 1999. Ten great public health achievements in the 20th century. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 11 items.

Annotation: This resource features a series of reports published in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports between April and December 1999 on 10 public health achievements, reflecting the successful response of public health to the major causes of morbidity and mortality for the period 1900-1999. Topics include vaccination, motor-vehicle safety, workplace safety, control of infectious diseases, decline in deaths from coronary heart disease and stroke, safer and healthier foods, healthier mothers and babies, family planning, fluoridation of drinking water, and tobacco as a health hazard. Critical changes in the U.S. public health system during the century are also addressed.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Cardiovascular diseases, Children, Families, Family planning, Fluorides, Food safety, Health policy, History, Infant health, Infection control, Maternal health, Morbidity, Mortality, Motor vehicle safety, Occupational safety and health, Oral health, Public health, Strokes, Systems development, Tobacco use, Vaccination effects, Water

David and Lucile Packard Foundation. 1999. When school is out. Los Altos, CA: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, 160 pp., exec. summ. (7 pp.). (The future of children; v. 9, no. 2, Fall 1999)

Annotation: This issue of "The Future of Children" focuses on after-school programs and the growing awareness of the risks and potential that lie hidden in the time children spend outside classrooms. Topics of individual articles are: (1) an analysis of the growing demand for out-of-school programs; (2) a summary of demographic information about school children including historical comparisons; (3) the development of children ages six to fourteen; (4) strategies that black families in impoverished neighborhoods use to protect their children from street culture; (5) challenges to immigrant children whose parents have little familiarity with American schools; (6) discussion of how parents set boundaries of exploration for third graders; (7) examination of the varied arrangements parents make for after school care; (8) after school programs for low-income children; (9) youth development programs for early teens; (10) the role of school in children's out-of-school time; (11) four commentaries on the policy climate for after-school programs; and (12) latchkey children. A selected bibliography is also included. The executive summary includes an analysis of the need for out-of-school care, recommendations, and brief summaries of each of the articles.

Contact: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, 343 Second Street, Los Altos, CA 94022, Telephone: (650) 948-7658 E-mail: https://www.packard.org/contact-us Web Site: https://www.packard.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISSN 1054-8289.

Keywords: Adolescents, After school programs, Blacks, Child care, Child development, Communities, Community participation, Demography, Families, Financing, History, Immigrants, Latchkey children, Low income groups, Parenting, Policy development, School age child care, Schools

De Angelis CD , ed. 1999. The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine curriculum for the twenty-first century. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 248 pp.

Annotation: This book describes how the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine changed its curriculum from a traditional, faculty-oriented model to a student-oriented model based on adult learning strategies. It is intended to help the reader gain practical knowledge of the process as well as knowledge of the specific components of the curriculum. It provides a brief history of undergraduate medical education at Johns Hopkins, an overview of the process of change, and descriptions of individual components of the curriculum. Chapters discuss the teaching of basic sciences; interrelated courses based on organ systems; a four-year longitudinal Physician and Society course; a new curriculum for medical informatics and support services for computer-based education; student placements in the offices of community-based private practitioners; curriculum reform in the clinical years; and early evaluations of the general curriculum, specific courses, and the students.

Contact: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2715 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-4363, Telephone: (410) 516-6900 Secondary Telephone: (800) 537-5487 Fax: (410) 516-6998 E-mail: kk@press.jhu.edu Web Site: http://www.press.jhu.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-8018-5977-8 (cloth), ISBN 0-8018-6350-3 (paper).

Keywords: Bioethics, Community based services, Curricula, Evaluation, History, Information systems, Interdisciplinary approach, Learning, Medical education, Medical schools, Models, Primary care, Reform

Dorey AKV. 1999. Better baby contests: The scientific quest for perfect childhood health in the early twentieth century. Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company, 265 pp.

Annotation: This book recounts the history of the better baby contests held in the years before World War I. The first section discusses steps to reduce infant mortality and the beginnings of the healthy baby contests. The second section explains what standards were used to judge babies and public relations considerations for the contests. Section III describes the parent education programs begun in conjunction with the contests. The fourth and final section of the book documents criticism of the contests and tells of alternate infant health programs developed in response to that criticism.

Contact: McFarland Press, P.O. Box 611, Jefferson, NC 28640, Telephone: (336) 246-4460 Secondary Telephone: (800) 253-2187 Fax: (336) 246-5018 E-mail: info@mcfarlandpub.com Web Site: http://www.mcfarlandpub.com $38.50 plus shipping. Document Number: ISBN 0-7864-0617-8.

Keywords: Child welfare, Health promotion, History, Infant development, Infant health, Infant mortality, Parent education programs, Program development, Public relations, Standards, Urban environment

Michel S. 1999. Children's interests/mother's rights: The shaping of America's child care policy. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 410 pp.

Annotation: This book is a comprehensive history of child care policy and practices in the United States from the colonial period to the present. It shows how child care policy in the United States was shaped by changing theories of child development and early childhood education, attitudes toward maternal employment, and conceptions of the proper roles of low-income and minority women.

Contact: Yale University Press, P.O. Box 209040, New Haven, CT 06520-9040, Telephone: (203) 432-0960 Fax: (203) 432-0948 Web Site: http://yalepress.yale.edu/yupbooks/home.asp Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-300-05951-5.

Keywords: Child care, Child care policy, Child development, Early childhood education, History, Low income groups, Minority groups, Parent rights, Working mothers

Nehring WM. 1999. A history of nursing in the field of mental retardation and developmental disabilities. Washington, DC: American Association on Mental Retardation, 205 pp.

Annotation: This book focuses primarily on the history of nursing in mental retardation (MR) since the late 1980s. The book includes the following chapters: (1) early care, terminology, and organized education: 1800-1899; (2) eugenics, community service, and the growth of nursing education: 1900-1929; (3) growth of nursing in institutional and community settings: 1930-1959, (4) federal support for MR and nursing education: 1960-1969; (5) MR in a new light: 1970-1979; (6) setting the standard for education, practice, and research: 1980 forward, and (7) the changing role of nursing in MR and developmental disabilities (DD) in the 21st century. The book includes five appendices: (1) a parallel look at important events in history; (2) Colorado State Home and Training School for Mental Defectives; (3) texts, guides, and pamphlets on MR-DD written by nurses; (4) significant legislation related to MR-DD since 1960, and (5) chronological list of nursing dissertations on topic related to MR-DD. References and legislative references are included.

Contact: The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 501 Third Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 387-1968 Secondary Telephone: (800) 424-3688 Fax: (202) 387-2193 E-mail: dcroser@aaidd.org Web Site: http://www.aamr.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-940898-68-3.

Keywords: Developmental disabilities, History, Legislation, Mental retardation, Nurses, Nursing, Nursing education, Research

Dryfoos JG. 1998. Full service schools: A revolution in health and social services for children, youth and families. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers, 336 pp.

Annotation: This book describes a comprehensive approach to school-based clinics that serves to increase access to health care for children and adolescents at the same time that it generally improves the quality of education. Chapters focus on educational reform, the history of support services in our country, service delivery issues in school clinics, and funding problems. The book also discusses model programs such as the settlement house in the school and the community-school. Appendices include profiles of state initiatives and lists of federal funding sources.

Contact: Jossey-Bass Publishers, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Corporate Headquarters, 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030, Telephone: (201) 748-6000 Fax: (201) 748-6088 E-mail: info@wiley.com Web Site: http://www.JosseyBass.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Education, Financing, History, Model programs, Primary care, School age children, School based clinics, School health programs, School health services, State programs

Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities. 1998. Parallels in time [and] the learning center. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities, 2 CD-ROMs; 10 pp. booklet.

Annotation: This two-volume CD-ROM set was produced to preserve, in a usable and educational format, the history of people with disabilities and the history of the Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities. Volume I, Parallels in Time, traces present attitudes and treatments of people with developmental disabilities. Volume 2, The Learning Center, is a collection of state plans, policy papers, studies, reports, curriculum modules, publications and briefing booklets, and other documents produced by the Council during its 25-year history.

Contact: Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities, 370 Centennial Office Building, 658 Cedar Street, Saint Paul, MN 55155, Telephone: (651) 296-4018 Secondary Telephone: (877) 348-0505 Fax: (651) 297-7200 E-mail: admin.dd@state.mn.us Web Site: http://www.mnddc.org Available at no charge.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, CD-ROMs, Developmental disabilities, History, Minnesota, State agencies

Prescott HM. 1998. A doctor of their own: The history of adolescent medicine. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 238 pp.

Annotation: This book traces the history of adolescent medicine, drawing on oral histories of physicians in the field, patient records, medical and popular advice literature, and letters from adolescents and parents. The book examines the interplay between the emergence of adolescent medicine and changes in American family relationships, youth culture, popular perceptions about young people, and the social experience of adolescence. It traces the development of adolescent medicine from its origins at Boston Children's Hospital in the 1950s to the present, with special attention to the role of young people themselves. It discusses how the mid-twentieth-century emergence of adolescent medicine has resulted from a combination of social changes and has placed adolescents at the center of the national agenda.

Contact: Harvard University Press, 79 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (800) 405-1619 Secondary Telephone: 401-531-2800 Fax: (800) 406-9145 E-mail: contact_hup@harvard.edu Web Site: http://www.hup.harvard.edu $35.00. Document Number: ISBN 0-674-21451-7.

Keywords: Adolescent medicine, History, Oral history

Tompkins JR, Brooks BL, Tompkins TJ. 1998. Child advocacy: History, theory, and practice. Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press, 134 pp.

Annotation: This book addresses child advocacy as a process that seeks to champion the right of all children and to make every child's needs known and met. The text is directed at analyzing the alienation of children from supportive environments that are vital to children's psychological and social development. Advocacy is viewed as a process that seeks to champion the rights of all children and to make every child's needs known and met. The contents include a discussion of the emergence of child advocacy at the national level, child advocacy as the National Institute of Mental Health's highest priority, the 1971 White House Conference on Children, advocacy models in North Carolina, a definition of child advocacy in the 1990s, the ecological theory of advocacy, the advocacy needs of children, the purpose of advocacy, proactive advocacy, a case study of advocacy, university and community collaboration, a parent training approach, a child advocacy commission model, developing local advocacy councils, advocacy in the treatment and education of adjudicated children, and delivery of services through boards for children in trouble.

Contact: Carolina Academic Press, 700 Kent Street, Durham, NC 27701, Telephone: 919-489-7486 Fax: (919) 493-5668 E-mail: cap@cap-press.com Web Site: http://www.cap-press.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-89089-959-2.

Keywords: Child advocacy, Child welfare, Children, Children's rights, Collaboration, Communities, Conferences, High risk children, History, Local MCH programs, National Institute of Mental Health, North Carolina, Parent education, Universities

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Services for Children with Special Health Needs. 1998. Implementing Title V CSHCN programs: A resource manual for state programs. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Services for Children with Special Health Needs, ca. 200 pp.

Annotation: This resource manual for state Title V Children with Special Health Needs (CSHCN) Programs contains materials that support the efforts of program leadership to carry out their legislated responsibilities. These materials include four annotated bibliographies of key documents and resources; a brief legislative history of Title V of the Society Security Act and Maternal and Child Health Services Block Grant Program; a discussion of the MCH Block Grant Performance Measures within the context of both the national agenda for CSHCN and the core CSHCN Program functions; an overview of the Division's current programmatic, product development, and technical assistance activities; and selected resource materials from other related initiatives. The annotated bibliographies are organized under four topical areas: rehabilitation services for Social Security beneficiaries, providing services to CSHCN, development of community systems of services, and family centered care. These bibliographies include citations to policy briefs, briefing books, federal agency documents, project reports, training materials, legislation, journal articles, and books. Each listing provides information about the document, including a brief summary and where to obtain it. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Institute for Child Health Policy, University of Florida, 1329 SW 16th Street, Room 5130 , Gainesville, FL 32608, Telephone: (352) 265-7220 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (352) 265-7221 Contact E-mail: ICHP@qm.server.ufl.edu Web Site: http://www.ichp.ufl.edu/ichp Available from the website.

Keywords: Bibliographies, Block grants, Children with special health care needs, Community programs, Family centered care, History, Legislation, MCH services, Manuals, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Rehabilitation programs, Social Security Act, Special health care services, State CSHCN programs, Title V, Title V programs

Weisman CS. 1998. Women's health care: Activist traditions and institutional change. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 300 pp.

Annotation: The subject of this book is the relationship between women and health care institutions, particularly how women experience health care and seek to change it. The specific objectives are to examine the social and historical context of women's health as a recurring public issue in the United States, to investigate current health care delivery issues for women and models for change, and to consider how women's health issues can be incorporated in health care policy making. Chapter one presents some concepts and theoretical perspectives guiding the sociohistorical consideration of women's health as a public issue and of gender as an attribute of health care. Chapter two provides a historical overview of five episodes of public attention to women's health issues that constitute waves in the women's health "mega movement." Chapter three considers the claim that women are disadvantaged because of inequitable access to the benefits of health care. Chapter four addresses the issue of whether women's health care ought to be delivered by women providers or in separate organizations for women. And chapter five provides a discussion of how women's concerns can be incorporated into health care policy making.

Contact: AcademyHealth, 1150 17th Street, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 292-6700 Fax: (202) 292-6800 E-mail: info@academyhealth.org Web Site: http://www.academyhealth.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-8018-5825-9.

Keywords: Health care reform, History, Policy development, Political processes, Sociocultural factors, United States, Women, Women's health, Women's health services

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001. Application guidance for the abstinence education provision of the 1996 welfare law P.L. 104-193, new section 510 of Title V of the Social Security Act. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, v.

Annotation: This guidance describes how to apply for the new formula grant program, Section 510 (abstinence education), that was added to Title V of the Social Security Act in 1996. The application was due July 15, 1997. An accompanying letter describes how to use the guidance for submitting the FY 1999 application and the FY 1998 annual report, July 15, 1998. The following volumes are for the next year's application and the previous year's annual report: 1999 (due July 15, 1999), 2000 (due July 15, 2000), 2001 (due July 15, 2001). The last volume has attached the grant application guidance of the Public Health Services which forms part of the requirements of all applications.

Keywords: Abstinence education, Adolescent health, Applications, Community programs, Federal programs, History, Sexuality education

Hutchins VL. 1997. Supporting pediatricians in the community: A history of CATCH (Community Access to Child Health). Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 36 pp.

Annotation: This monograph is the historical part of an evaluation of Community Access to Child Health (CATCH) funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The narrative text covers the development of the Healthy Children program of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the subsequent initiation of the CATCH program which focuses on pediatrician leadership in community based child health services. The appendices include a comprehensive chronology of CATCH and a CATCH timeline.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, American Academy of Pediatrics, Child health services, Community Access to Child Health, Community based services, Health care delivery, History, Leadership, Outreach, Pediatricians

Lindenmeyer K. 1997. A right to childhood: The U.S. Children's Bureau and child welfare, 1912-1946. Urbana, IL: University Of Illinois Press , 368 pp.

Annotation: This publication presents a history of the U.S. Children's Bureau from 1912 to 1946. It discusses such topics as the origins of the Bureau from 1900, promoting maternal and child health, the 1921 Maternity and Infancy Act (Sheppard-Towner), child labor reform, social policy for children with special needs, security for children during the Depression, and activities during World War II. A selected bibliography is included.

Contact: University of Illinois Press, 1325 South Oak Street, Champaign, IL 61820, Telephone: (217) 333-0950 Fax: (217) 244-8082 E-mail: uipress@uillinois.edu Web Site: http://www.press.uillinois.edu/ $24.00. Document Number: ISBN 0-252-02275-0.

Keywords: Child welfare, Children's Bureau, Federal MCH programs, Federal agencies, History

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 1997. Abstinence advisory #1. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 2 pp.

Annotation: This advisory is designed to help states' panels of reviewers when they evaluate grant proposals submitted for the abstinence education program, Section 510 of Title V of the Social Security Act. It describes issues encountered by the Adolescent Family Life (AFL) Program when they gave funding to religiously-related organizations. The advisory is accompanied by guidance that was prepared for AFL grantees on how to handle questions that arose and a checklist for reviewing grant applications

Keywords: Abstinence education, Adolescent health, Applications, Community programs, Federal programs, History, Sexuality education

Baker MM. 1996. Caring for the children: The history of pediatrics in Texas. Dallas, TX: Texas Pediatric Society, 270 pp.

Annotation: This book chronicles the history of the pediatric profession in Texas from the mid 19th century to the present.

Contact: Texas Pediatric Society, 401 West 15th Street, Ste 682, Dallas, TX 78701, Telephone: (512) 370-1506 Fax: (512) 473-8659 E-mail: Mary.Green-Noble@txpeds.org Web Site: http://www.txpeds.org/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-9651681-0-7.

Keywords: History, Pediatrics, Texas

Lansdown R. 1996. Children in hospital: A guide for family and careers. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 265 pp.

Annotation: This book provides a historical background and analyzes current trends in the hospitalization of children and adolescents; it provides caregivers and families information and advice on the topic. It includes statistics on the incidence of hospitalized children and adolescents and the personnel who care for them. The following topics are addressed, among others: communication between staff and parents, play, preparing for hospitalization, emotional factors, pain, life-threatening conditions, cooperation with prescribed treatments, surgery, and stress among caregivers.

Contact: Oxford University Press, 198 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (800) 451-7556 Secondary Telephone: (212)726-6000 E-mail: custserv@oup.com Web Site: http://www.oup.com/us Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-19-262357-7.

Keywords: Adolescents, Caregivers, Children, Coping, Families, History, Hospitalization, Parent professional relations, Statistics, Trends

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 1996. Legislative base: Maternal and Child Health Services Block Grant, Title V of the Social Security Act—Compilation of maternal and child health legislation, 1912-1996. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 588 pp., 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: This CD-ROM reproduces federal legislation related to maternal and child health, including: Social Security Act, Public Health Service Act, Civil Rights Act, selected provisions of other laws, legislative history of Title V of the Social Security Act, program guidance for Title V, and organizational structure of Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: CD-ROMs, Child health, Federal MCH programs, History, Legislation, Maternal health, Social Security Act, Title V

Canada G. 1995. Fist stick knife gun: A personal history of violence in America. Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 179 pp.

Annotation: This book presents the author's personal memories of growing up in New York City. It presents a social history on the incorporation of violence as an acceptable code of conduct into the urban society since the 1960s. It shows how young boys were introduced into the rituals involving the fist, stick, and knife; and it integrates the later introduction of guns into those rituals as well. The author's narrative also includes his vision on how the prevalence of violence in society can be reduced in the future.

Contact: Beacon Press, 25 Boston Street, Boston, MA 02108-2892, Telephone: (617) 742-2110 Fax: (617) 723-3197 E-mail: publicity@beacon.org Web Site: http://www.beacon.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-8070-0423-5.

Keywords: Children, History, New York, Personal narratives, Urban population, Violence

Fifield M, Fifield B. 1995. The evolution of university affiliated programs for individuals with developmental disabilities: Changing expectations and practices. Silver Spring, MD: American Association of University Affiliated Programs, ca. 120 pp.

Annotation: This report is a historical overview of the evolution of the network of University Affiliated Programs for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities. Sections include background, a call to action outlining legislation and program proposals, an overview of the evolution of UAPs, themes in UAP evolution, issues in the future of UAPs, a summary, and references. Also included are numerous appendices about UAPs and the periods in which they evolved. Throughout the report, tables are provided with information on UAP recommendations, characteristics of the facilities and directors, changes to UAPs, and the involvement of the UAP network in consumer empowerment activities and American with Disabilities Act (ADA) implementation activities.

Contact: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1000, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 588-8252 Fax: (301) 588-2842 E-mail: aucdinfo@aucd.org Web Site: http://www.aucd.org

Keywords: Developmental disabilities, History, Mental retardation, Professional training, University affiliated programs

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. 1995. William McConway Hiscock historic collection dedication. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 videotape (VHS, 1/2 inch). (Hiscock Collection)

Annotation: This videotape shows the dedication of the William McConway Hiscock Collection at the National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health on November 3, 1995. This collection contains materials about the federal Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) program that were published in the 1970s and 1980s. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: EPSDT, Federal MCH programs, History, Libraries

Perkins J, Zinn SF. 1995. Toward a healthy future: Early and periodic screening, diagnosis, and treatment for poor children . [no place]: National Health Law Program, Texas Rural Legal Aid, 1 v,

Shonick W. 1995. Government and health services: Government's role in the development of U.S. health services, 1930-1980. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 516 pp.

Annotation: This book examines the role of the government in developing the systems of health services in the United States between the 1930s and 1980s. It traces the development of the health systems within the context of the economic, social, and political policies of governments at the local, state, and federal levels. The topics covered range from public health through medical care, health facilities, the national development of local health planning, and the regulation of private services. Environmental health, health education, and Medicare are also considered. Broad topics include community-wide preventive programs and control of public health activities; the direct provision of health care by the government; the government as payer for medical care provided by others; and the government roles in health services resource development, health services research promotion, and in fostering coordination and planning of the health delivery system.

Contact: Oxford University Press, 198 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (800) 451-7556 Secondary Telephone: (212)726-6000 E-mail: custserv@oup.com Web Site: http://www.oup.com/us $95.00. Document Number: ISBN 0-19-506968-4.

Keywords: Federal government, Government role, History, Local government, Public health, Public health services, State government

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. [1994]. Fifty years: Cadet Nurse Corps service, a proud tradition that continues. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 3 items.

Annotation: This packet of information contains a letter inviting members of the Cadet Nurse Corps to a golden anniversary celebration, a preregistration form for the commemorative conference, and a brochure that gives a capsule history of the Cadet Nurse Corps. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Photocopy available at no charge.

Keywords: Cadet Nurse Corps, History, Nurses, Nursing education, Professional training

Health Insurance Association of America. 1994-. Sourcebook of health insurance data. Washington, DC: Health Insurance Association of America, annual.

Annotation: This annual compilation of health insurance data focuses on managed care programs, medical care costs, hospital utilization, and morbidity and mortality statistics. The sources for this book are the Health Insurance Association of America's annual survey along with reports from insurance companies, government agencies, hospital and medical associations, and private research companies. Tables depict interrelationships between medical costs and the Consumer Price Index, physician fees, and the Gross National Product. The report includes figures on the Social Security Disability Insurance Program, workplace injuries, childbirth costs, transplant procedures, and AIDS-related expenditures. Hospital utilization statistics such as discharge rates, length of stay, and uncompensated care expenditures include data for community hospitals. A historical overview of the health insurance industry and health maintenance organizations is included along with a chronological listing of industry-related facts.

Keywords: AIDS, Age factors, Costs, Employers, Gender, Health care financing, Health insurance, Health maintenance organizations, History, Hospitals, Injuries, Managed care, Marital status, Medicaid, Medicare, Mental disorders, Mortality, Race, Services, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Substance abuse, Surveys, Trends, Uninsured persons

Hutchins VL. 1994. History of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau: A presentation to the National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 videotape.

Annotation: This VHS videotape of Dr. Vince L. Hutchins' brown bag presentation at the National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health gives an overview of the history of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Dr. Hutchins discusses the cycles of funding for maternal and child health issues over eight decades and the impact that socioeconomic factors have had on MCH program development. Discussion after the presentation focuses on the potential effects of health care reform on maternal and child health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child health, Children's Bureau, Early intervention services, Federal MCH programs, Federal grants, Federal programs, Health care reform, History, Legislation, Maternal health, Social factors, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Videotapes

Kagan SL with Neville PR. 1994. Integrating services for children and families: Understanding the past to shape the future. Falls Church, VA: National Center for Service Integration, 232 pp.

Annotation: This book reviews the history, theory, and current practice of service integration within the field of social services. It considers the underlying assumptions, barriers, and strategies that have characterized the movement to date, and it extracts principles and insights that will affect the development of future policies.

Keywords: History, Policy development, Service integration, Social services

Kondratas R. 1994. Images from the history of the Public Health Service. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, 177 pp.

Annotation: This book contains photographs from an exhibit that depicted people involved in the work of the U.S. Public Health Service over much of its history. The photographs cover six themes: disease control and prevention (health care for seamen and fighting the spread of epidemic diseases), biomedical research, pure food and drugs, mental health and drug abuse, health care delivery, and international health.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Historian's Office, 5600 Fishers Lane , Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-5363 Fax: (301) 443-4193 E-mail: lhobbs@psc.gov Web Site: http://lhncbc.nlm.nih.gov/apdb/phsHistory/ Limited number of copies available at no charge.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Federal programs, History, Public Health Service, S, U

Marmor TR. 1994. Understanding health care reform. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 284 pp.

Annotation: This book contains essays on issues relating to the reform of the national health care system. They presents various facets that will affect the success of the reform movement. There are four sections which address the following broad topics: the politics of medical care and the constraints they place on reform, the debate over universal health coverage, examples of other health perspectives based on experiences in Canada and Japan, and dilemmas and decisions associated with the various policy choices. Individual essays examine the following subjects, among others: medical care crises and the welfare state, nonprofit organizations and health care, rationing, cutting waste by making rules, competition in medical care, and hype and hyperbole in health reform.

Contact: Yale University Press, P.O. Box 209040, New Haven, CT 06520-9040, Telephone: (203) 432-0960 Fax: (203) 432-0948 Web Site: http://yalepress.yale.edu/yupbooks/home.asp Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-300-05879-9.

Keywords: Canada, Economic factors, History, International perspectives, Japan, National health care reform, Policy analysis, Policy development

Resnik S. 1994. The social history of hemophilia in the United States (1948-1988): The emergence and empowerment of a community. [New York, NY]: Columbia University School of Public Health, Division of Health Policy and Management, 345 pp.

Annotation: This doctoral dissertation chronicles and analyzes the transformation of hemophilia--an inherited, incurable blood disease--into a manageable chronic condition over the course of 40 years. It uses an ethnographic approach in juxtaposition with documentary analysis and includes a definition of hemophilia and a history of the disease and its treatment. The dissertation is divided into the following chapters: (1) introduction; (2) the dismal era; (3) emerging from the dismal era (1948-1965); (4) the 60s: the beginning of a golden interval; (5) the hemophilia community becomes politicized--the late 60s and early 70s; (6) politics and the blood business; (7) the meaning of the maternal and child health years; (8) the AIDS era begins: the years of confusion and denial (1980-1982); (9) the AIDS era: conflicts between lay and medical leadership emerge (1983-1985); (10) the AIDS era (1985-1988): the hemophilia community rises to the challenge; and (11) conclusions. End notes, references, and a bibliography are provided. The appendices include a glossary; informant discussions, forms, codes, shapers and witnesses; research methods; a list of hemophilia treatment centers and chapters; federal program regions; treatment center outcome data; HIV hemophilia data; the Tri-Agency Model; and the evolution of the U.S. hemophilia culture.

Keywords: AIDS, Hemophilia, Hemotologic disorders, History, Research, Social factors, United States

Rushton AR. 1994. Genetics and medicine in the United States, 1800-1922. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 224 pp.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions, Division of Nursing. 1993 (ca.). A century of caring: A celebration of public health nursing in the United States 1893-1993. Washington, DC: U.S. Bureau of Health Professions, Division of Nursing, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report brings together a collection of photographs from 1893-1993 that reflects the rich and diverse history of public health nursing during that time.

Contact: U.S. Bureau of Health Workforce, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Parklawn Building, Room 8-05, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-5794 Contact Phone: (301) 443-1592 Fax: (301) 443-2111 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/about/organization/bureaus/bhw/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: History, Public health nursing, United States

Chadwyck-Healey. 1993. The Children's Bureau: Documentary sources from the National Archives. Alexandria, VA: Chadwyck-Healey, 367 pp.

Annotation: This finding aid lists the documents contained in the Records of the Children's Bureau 1912-1969 microfilm collection of 290 reels. It lists documents according to their sequence on the microfilm, and gives author, title, date and sometimes source of the material. It is divided into six parts: child welfare, child legislation, the Children's Bureau history, maternal and child health, Children's Bureau Merritt files, and Children's Bureau chief's files. There is no subject index.

Contact: Chadwyck-Healey, ProQuest Information and Learning, 789 East Eisenhower Parkway P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346, Telephone: (734) 761-4700 x 3333 Secondary Telephone: (800) 521-0600 E-mail: info@il.proquest.com Web Site: http://www.il.proquest.com/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child welfare, Children's Bureau, Federal MCH programs, History, Legislation, Maternal health

Klaus A. 1993. Every child a lion: The origins of maternal and infant health policy in the United States and France, 1890–1920. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 298 pp.

Annotation: This book provides a comparative history of the development of government policies regarding the health of mothers and infants in the United States and France during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Topics include: how different political ideas shaped the approach to infant mortality in each country; the medical discourse on infant mortality in each country; the influence of women's activities in each country; the development of maternal welfare policy in France; the work of the U.S. Children's Bureau; and the effect of World War I and its aftermath on maternal and infant health policy in both countries.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-8014-2860-2.

Keywords: Children's Bureau, Federal government, France, History, Infant health, Maternal health, Policy development, Public policy, United States

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. 1992. Neonatal intensive care: A history of excellence. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, 50 pp.

Annotation: This report, which was originally presented at a symposium sponsored by the National Institute on Health in 1985 commemorating Child Health Day, presents a collection of essays written by pioneers in the field on the history and development of the neonatal intensive care unit.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Price unknown. Document Number: NIH 92-2786.

Keywords: Development, History, Neonatal intensive care units

U.S. President. 1991-2001. Child Health Day, by the President of the United States: A proclamation. Washington, DC: White House, 1-2 pp.

Annotation: These framed prints describe the importance of children in American society and proclaim the first Monday in October to be Child Health Day. Each is signed by the U.S. President. This series covers 1991-2001 (George H.W. Bush, William Clinton, and George W. Bush).

Contact: White House, Executive Office of the President, Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop

Keywords: Child Health Day, Child advocacy, Child welfare, Children, Health observances, History

Dally A. 1991. Women under the knife: A history of surgery. New York, NY: Chapman and Hall, 289 pp.

Annotation: This book explores the history of gynecological surgery in the 19th century, recognizing the advances in women's health made possible by gynecological practice and the difficulties experienced by the women in times of no anesthesia, lack of scientific knowledge, and lack of respect for the patient. A chapter on women doctors is included.

Keywords: Gynecology, History, Surgery, Women

Hymes JL. 1991. Early childhood education: Twenty years in review—A look at 1971-1990. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 438 pp.

Annotation: This book gives a year-by-year summary and assessment of events related to young children and early childhood education in the twenty years between 1971 and 1990. Bibliographical references are included.

Contact: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1313 L Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 232-8777 Secondary Telephone: (800) 424-2460 Fax: (202) 328-1846 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.naeyc.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-935989-41-2.

Keywords: AIDS, Child care, Chorionic villi sampling, Court decisions, Early childhood education, Fetal alcohol syndrome, History, Infant mortality, Legislation, Public policy, Trends, Young children

Hynes M, Schwartz R. 1991. MCH related federal programs: Legal handbooks for program planners: The special supplemental food program for women, infants and children (WIC). Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 28 pp.

Annotation: This handbook is one in a series of reports developed by the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs to assist state Title V programs in effectively coordinating with other federal programs. The handbooks provide information on the statutes and regulations underlying federal programs. They provide a structure and salient provisions relevant to the development of comprehensive, coordinated state and local MCH programs, such as coordinated service delivery strategies, colocation of clinics, and linking of data systems. Topics covered in this handbook include a history of the WIC program; current statutory and regulatory provisions for WIC; WIC/MCH coordination and intersecting issues; and a summary of state MCH program/WIC relationships. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: History, MCH programs, Nutrition policy, Nutrition services, SPRANS, WIC Program

Muncy R. 1991. Creating a female dominion in American reform, 1890-1935. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 221 pp.

Annotation: This book focuses on white, middle-class, American female reform activity between the Progressive era and the New Deal. The book develops the concept of a female dominion in an otherwise male empire of policymaking. The book is divided into five chapters, each of which follows the development of the dominion's distinguishing characteristics. Chapter 1 investigates the origins of the dominion. Chapter 2 focuses on the Children' Bureau. Chapter 3 discusses the supply of professionals from such places as the School of Social Services Administration at the University of Chicago. Chapter 4 focuses on the consolidation and expansion of the dominion's monopoly over child welfare policy between 1918 and 1924. Chapter 5 discusses the dominion's decline after 1924 and its eventual end in the 1930s.

Contact: Oxford University Press, 198 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (800) 451-7556 Secondary Telephone: (212)726-6000 E-mail: custserv@oup.com Web Site: http://www.oup.com/us $40, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-19-508924-0.

Keywords: Child welfare, History, Public policy, Reform, United States, Women

Cahan ED. 1989. Past caring: A history of U.S. preschool care and education for the poor, 1820-1965. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 59 pp.

Annotation: This study examines the history of programs for the care and education of preschool children in the United States. It describes the rise of a two-tier system that provided good services for higher income groups and poor services for lower income groups, and examines some of the consequences for poor children and their families of this stratified system. It describes early forms of preschool care and education, the 1920s and 1930s, the federal role as a series of crisis interventions, and the coincidences of forces in the 1960s.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Contact Phone: (212) 927-8793 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Contact E-mail: ejs22@columbia.edu Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Child care, Child care centers, Early childhood education, History, Preschool children, Social factors, Socioeconomic status

Egan M, Fernandez A. 1989. Title V in review: Two decades of analysis of selected aspects of the Title V program. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs and National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 95 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes conclusions and recommendations of selected projects, reports, and studies that examined the functioning of state Title V maternal and child health/children with special health needs programs between 1970 and 1988. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHC045.

Keywords: Federal MCH programs, History, State MCH programs, Title V programs

Koop CE. 1989. Remarks by C. Everett Koop, M.D., Sc.D., Surgeon General of the U.S. Public Health Service. Presented at the 100th Anniversary of the P.H.S. Commissioned Corps, January 4, 1989, Washington, DC.. , 36 pp.

Annotation: This document presents remarks delivered by the U.S. Surgeon General on January 4, 1989, at the 100th anniversary of the Public Health Service Commissioned Corps.

Contact: National Library of Medicine, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, Telephone: (301) 594-5983 Secondary Telephone: (888) 346-3656 Fax: (301) 402-1384 E-mail: custserv@nlm.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nlm.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Health services, History, Oral health, Public heath agencies

Maternal and Child Health Leadership Institute to Increase Leadership Skills Project. 1989. History and philosophy of maternal and child health. San Diego, CA: San Diego State University, 92 pp., 35 transparencies, and 51 slides.

Annotation: This notebook, an unpublished manuscript, has been compiled to assist users in making presentations about the history and philosophy of maternal and child health in the United States. It includes a narrative portion that describes important events from the late 1700s to 1989, plus transparencies that summarize the events and slides that illustrate them. It also includes a bibliography and a statement of philosophy. Additional matrix transparencies are included so the user can incorporate historical events in their own state. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: San Diego State University, Division of Maternal and Child Health, 6505 Alvarado Road, Suite 205, San Diego, CA Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child health, History, Maternal health, Slides, Training materials

Mullan F. 1989. Plagues and politics: The story of the United States Public Health Service. New York, NY: Basic Books, 223 pp.

Annotation: This monograph presents the history of the United States Public Health Service. It discusses the successes the service had against a dozen infectious diseases, including typhus, malaria, yellow fever, pellagra, and hookworm, and it focuses on the health issues of today, AIDS, cancer, drug abuse, product tampering, and homelessness. It also explores the politics of public health. It provides an analysis of the way the service has responded to political mandates while preserving its medical mission such as the control and elimination of dozens of diseases, the invention of hundreds of vaccines, the provision of care for millions of disadvantaged Americans, and the receipt of four Nobel Prizes.

Keywords: AIDS, Diseases, History, Immunization, Prevention, U.S. Public Health Service

Kavanagh JF. 1988. Understanding mental retardation: Research accomplishments and new frontiers. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Company, 371 pp.

Annotation: This book presents information from a national conference of the same name, held in conjunction with the centennial of the National Institutes of Health and the 25th anniversary of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. It provides an overview of 25 years of accomplishments in mental retardation, and discusses these topics: etiological models of retardation, the prenatal and neonatal periods, childhood and adolescence, and adulthood and old age.

Contact: Brookes Publishing, P.O. Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21285-0624, Telephone: (800) 638-3775 Secondary Telephone: (410) 337-9580 Fax: (410) 337-8539 E-mail: custserv@brookespublishing.com Web Site: http://www.brookespublishing.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Conferences, History, Mental retardation

MacLaury J. 1988. History of the Department of Labor, 1913-1988. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor,

Annotation: This resource documents the history of the U.S. Department of Labor for the period 1913-1988. Contents are presented in nine chapters by era as follows: the start-up of the department and World War I, the 1920s and the start of the Depression, the department in the New Deal and World War II, the post-war era and Korean War mobilization, the Eisenhower Administration, eras of the New Frontier and the Great Society, the Nixon and Ford Administrations, the Carter Administration, and the Reagan Administration.

Contact: U.S. Department of Labor, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management, Frances Perkins Building, Suite S-2203, 200 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20210, Telephone: (866) 487-2365 E-mail: contact-OASAM@dol.gov Web Site: http://www.dol.gov/oasam Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Federal agencies, History, Work force

National Commission to Prevent Infant Mortality. 1988. A historic day for children. Washington, DC: National Commission to Prevent Infant Mortality, 3 v.

Annotation: This program lists the events for the Corporate Summit for Children and provides brief biographies of the speakers. The program supplement offers a historical overview of federal initiatives to reduce infant mortality and a description of several public programs and activities that have contributed significantly to improving the health of mothers and children over the years. Secondly, the document contains biographical sketches of all former secretaries of Health, Education, and Welfare, and Health and Human Services. Finally, the winning essays on child health from a parent teacher association contest are included. An accompanying document consists of remarks by Carol Evans.

Keywords: Biographies, Department of Health and Human Services, Federal MCH programs, History, Infant mortality, Meetings, Prevention programs

Center for Women's and Children's Health. 1987. Improving access to maternity care: The politics of state initiatives. Chicago, IL: American Hospital Association, 113 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this book is to provide a brief chronology of existing federal laws and programs which provide and fund health services to mothers and children. With this foundation, the book looks at six states -- California, Florida, Massachusetts, Michigan, Oregon and Tennessee -- to provide insight on the legislative strategy, coalition building, and politics which combined for success in creating new state based maternity programs for the medically indigent women of their state. The book aims to report the political realities which brought about state action and state monies for maternity care.

Contact: American Hospital Association, 155 N. Wacker Drive, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 422-3000 Secondary Telephone: Contact Phone: (800) 242-2626 Fax: (312) 422-4796 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.aha.org

Keywords: California, Coalitions, Federal MCH programs, Florida, History, Massachusetts, Michigan, Obstetrical care, Oregon, Political processes, Poverty, State MCH programs, State legislation, Tennessee, Women

Ladd-Taylor M, ed. 1986. Raising a baby the government way: Mothers' letters to Children's Bureau, 1915-1932. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 212 pp. (The Douglas series on women's lives and the meaning of gender)

Annotation: This book is a collection of more than 100 letters from mothers sent to the Children's Bureau between 1915 and 1932, along with selected replies. The letters, which document the daily lives of mothers from various geographic regions and backgrounds, are organized into sections on pregnancy, childrearing, and the conditions of women's lives during this period in time. Each section begins with background information and a brief summary of the letters.

Contact: Rutgers University Press, Administrative Office, 100 Joyce Kilmer Avenue, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8099, Telephone: 732-445-7762 Fax: 732-445-7039 E-mail: marlie@rutgers.edu Web Site: http://rutgerspress.rutgers.edu/index.html $13.95 via Amazon.com or borrow (after free registration). Document Number: ISBN 0-8135-1177-1.

Keywords: Child health, Child rearing, Communication, Federal agencies, Government programs, History, Mothers, Personal narratives, Pregnancy

Schlossman SL, Brown J, Sedlak M. 1986. The public school in American dentistry. Santa Monica, CA: The Rand Corporation, 82 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an overview of the public schools' role in U.S. dentistry, focusing on the origins and development of school-based oral health programs prior to the 1970s. Topics include the early history of school dentistry, school programs during the depression, school dentistry from 1941 to 1961, and the demise of school dentistry.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-8330-0728-9.

Keywords: Children, History, Oral health, Public schools, School based clinics, School dentistry, School linked programs

U.S. Congress, House of Representatives, Committee on Education and Labor. 1986. The chairman's report on children in America: A strategy for the 100th Congress. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2 v. (99th Congress, 2nd Session, Serial no. 99-T; Serial no. 99-U)

Annotation: This report provides descriptions and legislative histories of federal programs that affect the rights of children to quality education, opportunities for self sufficiency, healthy bodies, and safe and livable environments. Although the list is not comprehensive, the programs included specifically address rights that every child should be afforded.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Price unknown.

Keywords: Child health, Child safety, Children, Education, Federal legislation, History, Reports

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service. 1986. Program survey on adolescent pregnancy . Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, 20 pp.

Hutchins VL. 1985. Celebrating events. Unpublished paper, 27 pp.

Annotation: This paper was presented at the 50th Anniversary meeting of the Association for Maternal and Child Health and Crippled Children's Programs in concert with the Association of Teachers of Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC, March 18, 1985.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Anniversaries, History, Title V programs

Johnston HL. 1985. Health for the nation's harvesters: A history of the migrant health program in its economic and social setting. Farmington Hills, MI: National Migrant Worker Council, 252 pp.

Annotation: The author begins with the origin of seasonal farm labor demand in the United States, and traces its history by describing population size and characteristics, housing, occupational hazards, and health conditions in general for this segment of workers. Developments leading to the Migrant Health Act of 1962, continuing program development, and projections of future trends are included.

Keywords: Farm workers, Federal legislation, History, Migrant health, Program development

Magee EM, Pratt MW. 1985. 1935-1985: 50 years of U.S. federal support to promote the health of mothers, children and handicapped children in America. Vienna, VA: Information Sciences Research Institute, 72 pp.

U.S. Bureau of Health Care Delivery and Assistance, Division of Maternal and Child Health. 1985. Giving: A celebration of maternal and child health in America. Rockville, MD: U.S. Bureau of Health Care Delivery and Assistance, Division of Maternal and Child Health, 1 v., 1 videotape (VHS, 20 min.).

Annotation: This notebook contains a typescript of an audiovisual presentation and accompanying slides on the history of maternal and child health in America. It also contains slides and printed copies of them, on the federal maternal and child health program, and on infant mortality review. Some slides are lacking. The videotape, produced for the 50th anniversary of the enactment of Title V, describes the history of maternal and child health efforts in the United States, including the establishment of the Children's Bureau and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Topics include the importance of developing maternal and child health programs, national efforts to coordinate individual state programs, funding of programs, and areas of health services provided to underserved populations.

Contact: National Health Law and Policy Resource Center, University of Iowa, 412 Boyd Law Building, Melrose and Byington Streets, Iowa City, IA 52242-1113, Telephone: (319) 335-9067 Fax: (319) 335-9098 E-mail: law-nhlp@uiowa.edu Web Site: http://blogs.law.uiowa.edu/nhlp Available from the website.

Keywords: Anniversaries, Audiovisual materials, Child health, Federal MCH programs, History, Maternal health, Slides

U.S. Congress, Congressional Research Service, and U.S. Congress, Congressional Budget Office. 1985. Children in poverty. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 670 pp.

Annotation: This study was prepared for the U.S. Congress house subcommittees on select revenue measures and public assistance and unemployment compensation to assist them in exploring the factors which influence the poverty rate among children. The researchers were asked to examine demographic trends, economic factors, government policies, and other factors which could help to explain why, despite increased government expenditures, the poverty rate among children has risen. Policy options to reduce poverty among children are also examined. The study contains three parts. Part one presents a historical analysis of children in poverty and federal policy directed at those children. Parts two and three explore various policy options to reduce poverty among children.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov

Keywords: Children, Demography, Economic factors, Federal programs, History, Poverty

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Care Financing Administration, Bureau of Program Operations, Child Health and Prevention Staff. 1985. Program development library for the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) Program. Baltimore, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Care Financing Administration, Bureau of Program Operations, 240 pp. (Hiscock Collection)

Annotation: This bibliography in the form of a classified catalog lists 159 items, mostly reports and articles, dealing with the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) Program that were developed during the period 1973-1983. It includes a subject-specific, in-house classification scheme by which the documents are listed. The classes include: direct services, such as outreach, support, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and continuing care; program management at the state and local level, including planning, budgeting, staff development, resource development, marketing and promotion, quality control, reporting requirements, research, demonstrations, and evaluation; and program management at the federal level, with categories similar to the state level, plus financing, policy, and legislation. Abstracts are provided for 124 of the listed items. The documents listed in this bibliography constitute the William McConway Hiscock EPSDT Collection, a special collection of materials donated to the Center by Bill Hiscock of the Health Care Financing Administration.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bibliographies, EPSDT, History, Program development

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 1985. Special issue: Maternal and child health anniversary. Health Resources and Services Administration Chronicle. 12(2):1-12. August 1985,

Annotation: This issue of the "Health Resources and Services Administration Chronicle" celebrates the achievements of maternal and child health since the children's programs that came into being with the Social Security Act of 1935. Several topics are highlighted: the Block Grant to the States (1981); nutrition and breastfeeding; adolescent health; UNICEF; chronically ill children; and early intervention services. There is also a brief history of maternal and child health federal programming since the inception of the Children's Bureau in 1912.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Photocopy available at no charge. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHB184.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Anniversaries, Breastfeeding, Child health, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Early intervention services, Federal grants, History, International organizations, Maternal health

King LS. 1984. American medicine comes of age, 1840-1920: Essays to commemorate the founding of the Journal of the American Medical Association, July 14, 1883. Chicago, IL: American Medical Association, 115 pp.

Annotation: This collection of essays examines the history of medicine in the U.S. between 1840 and 1920. The author concerns himself not with the scientific aspects of the field, but rather with social, educational, political, legal, and some economic issues. Chapters focus on medical education, medical ethics, germ theory, medical journalism, clinical science, specialization, making a living, and the impact of the automobile.

Contact: American Medical Association, 515 North State Street, Chicago, IL 60610, Telephone: (800) 621-8335 Fax: Web Site: http://www.ama-assn.org Price unknown.

Keywords: History, Medicine, United States

Oakley A. 1984. The captured womb: A history of the medical care of pregnant women. New York, NY: Basil Blackwell, 352 pp.

Annotation: This book describes the type of medical care given to pregnant women from the beginning of the 20th century in Great Britain.

Keywords: Great Britain, History, Prenatal care

Kamerman SB, Kahn AJ, Kingston P. 1983. Maternity policies and working women. New York: Columbia University Press, 183 pp.

Annotation: This book discusses maternity and the working woman, historical notes on maternity policies in the United States, employee and employer perspectives on maternity leave benefits, state and federal provisions for benefits, maternity policies in private industry, and trends and issues in maternity policies.

Contact: Columbia University Press, 61 West 62nd Street, New York, NY 10023, Telephone: (212) 459-0600 ext. 7129 Secondary Telephone: (800) 944-8648 Fax: (212) 459-3678 Web Site: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Keywords: Employee benefits, History, Parent rights, Personnel, Pregnancy, United States, Working women

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Maternal and Child Health. 1981 (ca.). Program components of the Office for Maternal and Child Health. [Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Maternal and Child Health], ca. 80 pp.

Annotation: This is a compilation of documents that outline some aspects of federal maternal and child health services, particularly Crippled Children. There are papers on objectives of the Maternal and Child Health Program for 1981-1983; a summary of the Crippled Children's Program; and information on improved pregnancy outcome and improved child health projects. Also included is information on projects related to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), genetic disease, hemophilia, and supplemental security income (SSI).

Keywords: Child health services, Children with special health care needs, Federal MCH programs, History, Maternal health services

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Services, Health Services Administration, Bureau of Community Health Services. 1980. Maternal and child health programs: Legislative base. Rockville, MD: U.S. Bureau of Community Health Services, 130 pp.

Annotation: This book is designed to be a ready reference for the administration of both the state maternal and child health and crippled children's programs of Title V and the program of projects which Title V embodies. In addition, related sections of the Social Security Act, the Social Security Amendments of 1972, the Public Health Service Act, and the Civil Rights Act are included in this book. With the exception of Title V, the other Acts mentioned are not printed in their entirety.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan. Document Number: DHHS (HSA) 80-5221 .

Keywords: Child health, Federal MCH programs, History, Legislation, Maternal health

Valdes-Dapena MA. 1980. Sudden unexplained infant death: 1970 through 1975—An evolution in understanding. Rockville, MD: U.S. Bureau of Community Health Services, 29 pp.

Annotation: This booklet describes new understanding about sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) based on recent research. It also describes current areas of interest and research in the future. The booklet is a reprint from Pathology Annual, part 1, vol, 12, p. 117-45, 1977.

Keywords: History, Research, SIDS

Josaitis EM. 1979. Report to the National Advisory Council on Maternal, Infant, and Fetal Nutrition. No place: National Advisory Council on Maternal Infant and Fetal Nutrition, 28 pp.

1978. Sudden infant death syndrome hearings book. unpublished, 1 v.

Annotation: This volume contains materials related to a hearing before the U.S.Senate Subcommittee on Child and Human Development on the accomplishments and plans authorized by the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Act of 1974 (P.L. 93-270). It includes statements, testimonies, descriptions of programs and materials, plans and accomplishments, and other materials.

Keywords: Federal legislation, Federal programs, History, SIDS

Tom SA. 1978. With loving hands: The life stories of four nurse-midwives. Unpublished manuscript, 130 pp.

Annotation: This thesis, submitted to the University of Utah School of Nursing, consists of the biographies of four women who practiced nurse-midwifery during the first forty years of the profession's existence. They were Rose McNaught, Lalla Mary Goggans, Aileen Hogan, and Agnes Reinders. The biographical information is analyzed for shared characteristics which could contribute to the response each woman made to the challenges she met in the course of her career. The accomplishments of the four nurse-midwives are examined in light of the changes in childbirth practices which occurred in the first half of the twentieth century.

Keywords: Biographies, Childbirth, History, Midwifery, Midwives

Grotberg EH, ed. 1977. 200 years of children. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office of Child Development, 486 pp.

Annotation: This book presents the major events, trends, and patterns of the past 200 years which have affected children of the United States. Chapters cover the following: (1) immigration and trends in mortality and health, education, and income; (2) historical trends in American family behavior; (3) the status of children 200 years ago, the founding of the Children's Bureau, and health personnel; (4) the educational system; (5) economic problems, children's psychological welfare, and child labor; (6) children's recreation; (7) children's literature; (8) child development; and (9) the child and the law.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Child welfare, Federal agencies, History

Manela R, Feingold E with Meyer R, Lauffer A, Overberger C. 1977. A brief history of the Medicaid Early and Periodic Screening Diagnosis and Treatment Program EPSDT. Washington, DC: U.S. Health Care Financing Administration, 20 pp. (Hiscock Collection; no. 68)

Annotation: This document is one of six information booklets with accompanying training materials for the Medicaid Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) program. It covers the origins of EPSDT; what states must do to implement EPSDT; some issues faced by EPSDT; the future of EPSDT; and questions and answers.

Keywords: EPSDT, History

President's Committee on Mental Retardation. 1977. Mental retardation: Past and present. Washington, DC: President's Committee on Mental Retardation; for sale by U.S. Government Printing Office, 276 pp. (Century of Decision series)

Annotation: This tenth annual report of the President's Committee on Mental Retardation traces the history of America's treatment of retarded persons. Encompassed within the scope of the report are the current efforts of the public and private sector concerning education, services, research, terminology, testing procedures, legal rights, economics and many other facets of the complex problem known as mental retardation.

Keywords: Disabilities, Education, History, Mental retardation, Reports, Research

1976. Hearing on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Act (P.L. 93-270). Unpublished, 1 v.

Annotation: This volume contains typescript and photocopied materials related to a hearing before the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Children and Youth. It includes the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare's accomplishments relating to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and their recommendations regarding extending P.L. 93-270, the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Act of 1974. It includes a transcript of testimony, a copy of the act, information about projects funded under the act, a budget, a list of materials, and other information.

Keywords: Federal legislation, Federal programs, History, SIDS

Flanagan L, ed. 1976. One strong voice: The story of the American Nurses' Association. Kansas City, MO: American Nurses' Association, 692 pp.

Annotation: This detailed account of the American Nurses' Association's (ANA) accomplishments was compiled in observance of the United States bicentennial year and the ANA eightieth anniversary. This history depicts the gradual expansion of nursing's role in health care from the time of the Revolutionary War to the present. It traces the implications of socioeconomic and political trends and scientific and technological advances for nursing services and manpower. Forceasts of developments which will have an impact on the nursing profession and health care system in the future are also discussed. Section one highlights the impact of the ANA on the development of nursing as an occupation and profession. Section two is a collection of the convention addresses of the ANA presidents.

Keywords: American Nurses Association, History, Nurses

Garrett M, comp. 1976. A forty-year history of the Association of State and Territorial Directors of Nursing. Indianapolis, IN: Indiana State Board of Health, 67 pp.

U.S. Bureau of Community Health Services. 1976. Brief program statements. Rockville, MD: U.S. Bureau of Community Health Services, 1 v.

Annotation: This notebook contains descriptions of maternal and child health programs in Title V of the Social Security Act and the Public Health Service Act. Topics include migrant health, national health services corp., community health centers, family planning, sickle cell anemia, sudden infant death syndrome, hemophilia, home health services, and Appalachia.

Keywords: History, Child health, Federal legislation, Maternal health, Social Security Act, Title V

U.S. Bureau of Community Health Services. 1976. Child health in America. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 72 pp.

Annotation: This publication is an outline of the history of child health in America from the 18th century to the 1970s. Topics covered include the flu epidemic during World War I, the founding of the Children's Bureau, the Sheppard-Towner Act, and the development of federal programs that focus on maternal and child health.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, History

U.S. Health Services Administration. 1975-1981. MCHS apportionment tables. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Services Administration, 1 v.

Beckwith JB. 1975. The sudden infant death syndrome. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office for Maternal and Child Health,, 34 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this paper is to present a general review of the problem of SIDS including data from 500 consecutive cases personally studied by the author. The author discusses the definition and terminology of SIDS, its history, epidemiology, pathologic findings, theories of causation, "near misses", synthesis of epidemiologic and pathologic findings, and counseling. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Counseling, Epidemiology, Etiology, History, Pathology, SIDS

Stiegler M, ed. 1975. When I was a child, 2250 B.C. - 1976 A.D.. [Detroit, MI]: Childrens Hospital of Michigan, 66 pp.

Annotation: This book is a history of childhood and the value of children in society. The discussion begins with ancient times (2250 B.C. - 1 A.D.) and continues to the time of publication, including many cultures and civilizations. The book is illustrated with reproductions of fine art and a list identifying these illustrations is found in the back of the book. Extensive references are included.

Keywords: Children, Children's rights, History

U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Office of the Secretary. 1975. Comprehensive report on the implementation of the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Act of 1974 (P.L. 93-270) (draft). Unpublished, 1 v.

Annotation: This volume contains a draft progress report of the administration of the information, educational, counseling and statistical portions of the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Act of 1974 (P.L. 93-270).

Keywords: Federal legislation, Federal programs, History, SIDS

Schlesinger ER, Stitt PG. 1974. The maternal and child health section: A political and social history. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association, 39 pp.

Schlesinger-Rockefeller Oral History Project. 1974. Interviews with Martha May Eliot, M.D.. Unpublished manuscript, 460 pp.

Annotation: This set of interviews is part of an oral history project conducted by the Schlesinger Library at Harvard University with a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation to document the part played by women in the delivery of health services, maternal and child care, family planning, marriage counseling, and sex education. Martha May Eliot was a pediatrician who was active in the U.S. Children's Bureau, the World Health Organization, and UNICEF.

Contact: Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 495-8647 Fax: (617) 496-8340 E-mail: slref@radcliffe.edu Web Site: http://www.radcliffe.edu/schlesinger_library.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children's Bureau, Federal MCH programs, International health, Maternal health, Oral history, Oral history

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Service. 1973. Maternal and child health service programs: Administering agencies and legislative base. Rockville, MD: Maternal and Child Health Service, annual.

Furman B. [1972]. A profile of the United States Public Health Service, 1798-1948. [Bethesda, MD]: National Library of Medicine, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare; Washington, DC: for sale by U.S. Government Printing Office, 487 pp.

Annotation: This book is a history of the United States Public Health Service written for the public. The history by Dr. R. C. Williams was written for the officers of the Public Health Service and complements this volume. The book traces American medical history, politics, social developments, and biographical vignettes to provide an understanding of the past and its influence on the present state of national health affairs.

Keywords: History, Public Health Service, United States

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. 1972. A common thread of service: An historical guide to HEW. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 52 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the development of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare since April, 1953, when it replaced the Federal Security Agency. It includes an organization chart, a list of budgets since 1953, legislation, program highlights, and a list of key officials, organized by the years they served.

Keywords: Department of Health, Education, Federal government, History, Legislation, S, U, and Welfare

White House Conference on Children (1970: Washington, D.C.). 1971. 1970 White House Conference on Children, December 13-18, 1970. [Washington, DC: White House Conference], 63 pp.

Annotation: This is the program of the 1970 White House Conference on Children. It dealt with issues from a perspective relating to the feelings and needs of the child. To help participants understand what the child feels and needs, children were asked to express their ideas about the major areas with which the conference was concerned through prose, poetry, and art. A selection of their work makes up the editorial content of the program. The children wrote about individuality; learning; health; parents and families, ; communities and environments; and laws, rights, and responsibilities. A history of the White House Conference on Children and Youth is included.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child health, Child health promotion, Children, Communities, Conferences, Families, Health status, History, Individual characteristics, Learning, Parents

Bremner RH, Barnard J, Hareven TK, Mennel RM, eds. 1970-1974. Children and youth in America: A documentary history. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 5 v.

Annotation: This publication was prepared by the Child and the State Project of the American Public Health Association, with support from the Children's Bureau of the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare. It presents the history of public policy toward children and youth in America from the colonial period to the present. It consists of introductory material and reproduced excerpts from original source documents. It covers such topics as health, education, child labor, care of dependent children, immigrants and minorities, juvenile delinquency, child protection, and public services.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child welfare, Children, History, Public policy, Youth

Coll BD. 1969, 1973r. Perspectives in public welfare: A history. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Intramural Research Division, 107 pp.

Annotation: This history views poor relief policies and practices from the medieval period through the 1920's. It discusses the English heritage, almshouses, outdoor relief, scientific charity, reform and reaction, and current public assistance. The book includes tables and ends with a bibliography.

Keywords: Demography, England, History, Poverty, Public assistance

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1969-1971. Regulations. Rockville, MD: U.S. Children's Bureau, 1 v.

Annotation: This notebook contains regulations related to maternal and child health and crippled children's services programs authorized under Title V of the Social Security Act for various dates between 1969 and 1971, some typescript and some reproduced from the Federal Register. Sections cover the overall act, family planning, maternity and infant care, children and youth, training, research, Title XIX (interrelationships of medical assistance programs with other programs or agencies), subprofessionals, reasonable costs, and procedures. The volume also contains two Children's Bureau publications: Grants for Maternity and Infant Care Projects: Policies and Procedures (1964) and Grants for Comprehensive Health Services for Children and Youth: Policies and Procedures (CB-1, 1965).

Keywords: Child health, Federal legislation, History, Maternal health, Regulations, Social Security Act, Title V

Eliot MM. 1967. The United States Children's Bureau. American Journal of Diseases of Children 114:565-573, (Reprint)

Forbes TR. 1966. The midwife and the witch. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 196 pp.

Annotation: This book examines superstitions and other beliefs about pregnancy and childbirth in Europe in past centuries, including pregnancy and fertility tests, the prediction of sex, chalcedony and pregnancy, word charms, the veil of good fortune, witchcraft, and the early regulation of English midwives. An extensive bibliography is included.

Keywords: History, Midwives, Pregnancy, Superstitions

Pryor R, ed. 1966. Heart disease in children: Training program in cardiology: Proceedings—Denver, Colorado, December 3-6, 1962. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Heart Disease Control Program, 74 pp. (Public Health Service publication: no. 1374)

Annotation: These conference proceedings discuss the anatomy of congenital and acquired heart disease in children, the physiology of the cardiovascular system, epidemiology of congenital and rheumatic heart disease, the importance of history, techniques in physical diagnosis, the contribution of the laboratory to diagnosis in heart disease, the rheumatic fever diagnostic service, psychological aspects of heart disease, attitude and activity in the therapy of rheumatic fever, medical therapy in congenital heart disease, general aspects of congenital anomalies in children, surgery in heart disease, role of the field nurse and public health services in the care of heart diseases, and the role of the medical social worker.

Keywords: Children, Congenital abnormalities, Congenital heart defects, Diagnosis, Epidemiology, Heart diseases, Heart surgery, History, Home care services, Physiology, Psychology, Public health services, Rheumatic heart disease, Social workers

1965. Public Law 89-97–July 30, 1965. Part 1—Maternal and Child Health and Crippled Children’s Services: Special Project Grants for Health of School and Preschool Children. , 8 pp.

Annotation: This excerpt from an amendment to the Social Security Act addresses increases in maternal and child health services and crippled children's services, planning for mental retardation services, and health care-related public assistance amendments including a study of resources on children's emotional illness.

Contact: U.S. Social Security Administration, 6401 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21235, Telephone: (800) 772-1213 Secondary Telephone: (800) 325-0778 Web Site: http://www.ssa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, History, Legislation, Maternal and child health services, Maternal and child health training, Social Security Act

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1965. The story of infant care. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Children's Bureau, 36 pp. ([Children's Bureau publication])

Annotation: This document tells the story of Infant Care, the Children's Bureau pamphlet first published in 1914. In addition to the history of that pamphlet, this document relates the reception of the pamphlet by doctors, allotments of copies to congressmen, the first major revision, later revisions, the 1951 edition, the tenth (1955) edition, the eleventh (1963) edition, and a history of the distribution and cost of the pamphlet. It is a publication of the U.S. Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children's Bureau, History, Infant development, Infant health, Infants, Pamphlets, Parenting

Morlock M. 1964. Homemaker services: History and bibliography. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau; for sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office, 116 pp. (Children's Bureau publication; no. 410-1964)

Annotation: This booklet describes the history of homemaker services from 1903 to 1964 and provides a bibliography of materials arranged by topic, such as types of programs, roles of professional workers, meeting special needs, appraisal of services, and others. It is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Keywords: Bibliographies, History, Homemaker services

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1964. Children's Bureau publications: An index to publications by number, title, author, and subject—1912 - May 1964. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 60 pp.

Annotation: This document lists publications of the Children's Bureau by number in the following categories: publications, folders, headliner series, statistical series, child welfare reports, juvenile delinquency facts and facets, work with children coming before the courts series, research relating to children bulletins, and research relating to special groups of children bulletins. A list of abbreviations and an alphabetical subject index are provided.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Child health, Children's Bureau, Federal agencies, History, Indexes, MCH programs, Maternal health

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1964. Historical perspective on mental retardation during the decade 1954-1964: A compilation of articles in Children. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 314 pp. (Children's Bureau publication; no. 426-1969)

Annotation: This volume includes articles on mental retardation, maternal and child health, and handicapped children's services reprinted from Children, the periodical of the Children's Bureau. The articles were originally published from 1954 to 1964. It is a publication of the U.S. Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: CSHCN programs, Child health, Child health services, Children with special health care needs, History, MCH services, Maternal health, Mental retardation

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Surgeon General's Advisory Committee on Smoking and Health. 1964. Smoking and health: Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service. Princeton, NJ: D. Van Nostrand, 387 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study of the relationship between smoking and health. Part one discusses the history of the subject, how the study was conducted, including the chief criteria used in making judgments, and a brief overview of the entire report with its conclusions. Part two presents in detail the evidence of the relationship of smoking to health, from the technical characteristics of tobacco and nicotine to evidence on smoking in relationship to cancer, certain respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, and other health conditions. A discussion of the psycho-social aspects of smoking and a characterization of the tobacco habit are also included.

Keywords: Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Health, History, Nicotine, Psychosocial factors, Respiratory diseases, Smoking, Studies, Tobacco

U.S. Health Services and Mental Health Administration. 1963-1973. Appropriation memorandum and apportionment tables. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Services and Mental Health Administration, 1 v.

Bradbury DE. 1962. Five decades of action for children. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 143 pp. (Children's Bureau publication; no. 358-revised 1962)

Oettinger KB. 1962. It's your Children's Bureau. [Rev. ed]. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Children's Bureau, 62 pp. (Children's Bureau publication; no. 357)

Annotation: This brochure describes the origins and history of the Children's Bureau from 1903 to 1962. It outlines topics such as the Bureau's creation to advance the well-being of children, reduce the use of child labor in hazardous industries, infant death, conditions in orphanages, and pregnancy loss due to lack of prenatal care. Topics also include Title V of the Social Security Act, increasing urbanization, and the Bureau's work in international welfare services.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child advocacy, Child health, Child welfare, Children's Bureau, Federal agencies, History, MCH services, Women's health

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1962. [50th anniversary of the Children's Bureau: Memory book]. [Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau], 1 v.

Annotation: This scrapbook contains newspaper and magazine articles, photographs, proclamations, and statements of support related to the 50th anniversary of the U.S. Children's Bureau on April 9, 1962.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Anniversaries, Child health, Children's Bureau, History, Maternal health

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1962. Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Children's Bureau, April 9, 1962. [Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau], 12 pp.

Annotation: This document contains the program of a one-day celebration of the 50th anniversary of the founding of the U.S. Children's Bureau. It includes a schedule of activities for the day and a roster of the members of the sponsoring committee who organized the celebration.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Children's Bureau, Federal agencies, History

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1962. Script for filmstrip entitled The Children's Bureau, 1912-1962: Its first 50 years. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Children's Bureau, 35 pp.

Annotation: This script is the history of the Children's Bureau for its first 50 years from 1912 to 1962 as presented at the Bureau's fiftieth anniversary celebration on April 9, 1962. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children's Bureau, History

Deitrick SS, Bradbury DE. 1961. The international activities of the Children's Bureau. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Children's Bureau, 20 pp.

Annotation: This document briefly relates the international activities of the Children's Bureau from 1912 through 1960. It is divided into eras: 1916-1929, 1930-1939, 1940-1949, and 1950-1960. Topics include efforts during World War I; the International Labor Organization; the Health Organization of the League of Nations during the years of global economic depression; World War II and the post war years including child refugees, civilian feeding, child health and welfare, the United Nations and its related agencies; the Point 4 Program, relations with international agencies, training program development and practice, and international health research.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Child health, Child welfare, Children, Children's Bureau, History, International programs

U.S. Social Security Administration. 1960. Basic readings in social security: 25th anniversary of the Social Security Act, 1935-1960. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 221 pp. (Publication no.28)

Annotation: This bibliography lists new contributions and items of continuing significance on the Social Security Act and programs administered under the act. Major topics include administering social security; public assistance and public welfare; maternal and child health and welfare; old-age, survivors, and disability insurance; unemployment insurance; health insurance, temporary disability insurance, and medical economics; services for families and children; the social services fields and methods; and international social welfare and international systems on social insurance. It was first published in 1936.

Keywords: Bibliographies, Federal programs, History, Social security

Barber MI, ed. 1959. History of the American Dietetic Association. Philadelphia, PA: J. B. Lippincott Publishers, 328 pp.

Annotation: This book relates the history of the American Dietetic Association from its beginning in 1917 to 1959. Chapters include a decade-by-decade review, the various sections of the organization, the dietitian in military service, and the ADA in the space age.

Contact: Wolters Kluwer Health, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, P.O. Box 1620, Hagerstown, MD 21741, Telephone: (800) 638-3030 Secondary Telephone: (301) 223-23000 Fax: (301) 223-2400 E-mail: customerservice@lww.com Web Site: http://www.lww.com

Keywords: Dietitians, History, Nutrition

Bradbury DE. 1956. Four decades of action for children: A short history of the Children's Bureau. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Government Printing Office, 90 pp. ([Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau); no. 358])

Annotation: This document describes the history of the US Children's Bureau from the idea in 1903, its founding in 1912, to the mid-1950s. Chapters include the creation of the Bureau, the early years (1912-1921), years of economic crisis (1921-1933), the coming of the maternal and child welfare program (1934-1940), the Bureau in wartime (1940-1945), and the decade 1946-1956. Each section discusses issues for all children and issues for special groups of children; including infant and maternal mortality studies, child welfare, juvenile courts and juvenile delinquency, and looking toward the future. Appendices include legislative selections and a chart listing federal grants to states.

Contact: U.S. Social Security Administration, 6401 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21235, Telephone: (800) 772-1213 Secondary Telephone: (800) 325-0778 Web Site: http://www.ssa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Children, Children's Bureau, History, Infant mortality, Juvenile delinquency, Maternal health, Maternal health, Oral health, Socioeconomic status

American Academy of Pediatrics. 1955. For the welfare of children: The addresses of the first twenty-five presidents of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Springfield, IL: Thomas, 288 pp.

Annotation: This volume presents the annual addresses (1921-1955) of the first twenty-five presidents of the American Academy of Pediatrics. These addresses are essentially personal observations on current problems considered important by each president as he concluded his span of office. As a compilation, they are both a history of the Academy and pediatrics during this time period. The underlying theme of the addresses is the dedication of the pediatrician to child welfare. The photograph of each president is reproduced and a short appreciation of each president, written by one or more contemporaries, is included. Remarks on each essay follow, giving in some instances the background of its composition and delivery.

Keywords: American Academy of Pediatrics, History, Pediatrics

Markoff S. 1954. The changing years, 1904-1954: 50th anniversary report. New York, NY: National Child Labor Committee, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report documents the achievements of the National Child Labor Committee decade by decade, from 1905 to 1954. A list of the Committee's major publications is included.

Keywords: Child labor, History, National Child Labor Committee

Blake JB. 1953. Origins of maternal and child health programs. New Haven, CT: Yale University, Department of Public Health, 42 pp.

Annotation: This paper traces the history of maternal and child health in Europe and also including the United States from as early as the 15th century, and more fully beginning with the eighteenth century. Comparisons are then drawn between the two. The role of the state and legislation, as well as private agencies, is discussed. Development of public health programs is also traced. Extensive footnotes appear throughout the paper.

Keywords: Child health, Europe, History, Legislation, Maternal health, Public health, United States

Pease MC. 1952. American Academy of Pediatrics: June 1930 to June 1951. [New York?], 302 pp.

Annotation: This book portrays the growth and development of the American Academy of Pediatrics since its formal organization in 1930. Part one discusses the organization, its officers, and committees. Part two looks at the Academy's record, pediatric medical education, and publications of the Academy. Part three discusses the Academy's relationships with the Children's Bureau and the American Medical Association. The book closes with a discussion of the future of the Academy.

Keywords: American Academy of Pediatrics, American Medical Association Children's Bureau, History, Medical societies, Pediatrics

Mannerheim B. 1951. The Children's Castle of the Mannerheim League, Finland. Helsinki, Finland: Tilgmann's Printing office, 32 pp.

Annotation: This booklet describes the Children's Castle of the Mannerheim League of Finland. The buildings, services, programs, staff, and patients of this hospital are described and explained. The booklet is extensively illustrated with black and white photographs.

Keywords: Child welfare, Finland, History, Nursing education, Pediatric hospitals

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1949-1965. Annual report of the Interdepartmental Committee on Children and Youth. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Children's Bureau, annual. ([Children's Bureau publication])

Annotation: This report includes a report of the committee's activity for the year, planning for the White House Conference follow up as accepted by the President's National Committee, resumes of programs of the monthly meetings (child development, juvenile delinquency, children of agricultural migrants, and the first afterview of the White House Conference), significant events in the history of the committee, a list of informational mailings to the state committees, and the membership of the committee. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Child development, Child health services, Child welfare, Children's Bureau, Committees, Conferences, Federal MCH programs, History, Juvenile delinquency, Migrants, United States

Sinai N, Anderson OW. 1948. EMIC (Emergency maternity and infant care): A study of administrative experience. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan, School of Public Health, 223 pp. (Bureau of Public Health Economics; Research series no. 3; (Children's Bureau related publication))

Annotation: This report focuses on the Emergency Maternity and Infant Care (EMIC) program of the U. S. Children's Bureau, one of several national health plans created in the United States in and around the 1930's, as a research laboratory in public health economics. Part One describes the backgound, establishment, and scopy of the program. Part Two discusses current health economic problems and the experiences of the EMIC, including organization and administration, beneficiaries, payment for physicians' and hospitals' services, and administrative controls of finances and quality of services.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Emergency Maternity and Infant Care Program, Federal MCH programs, Health insurance programs, History, Military, National health care reform, Prenatal care

Sinai N, Anderson OW. 1947. The Emergency Maternity and Infant Care program, 1943 - 1946. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan, School of Public Health, Bureau of Public Health Economics, 1 v.

Annotation: This report focuses on the Emergency Maternity and Infant Care (EMIC) program of the U. S. Children's Bureau, one of several national health plans created in the United States in and around the 1930's, as a research laboratory in public health economics. The report covers (1) establishment of the Children's Bureau, the Sheppard-Towner Act, and the Social Security Act; (2) the establishment of the EMIC program in the 1940's; (3) the development of rules and regulations; and (4) the scope of the EMIC program.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Emergency Maternity and Infant Care Program, Federal MCH programs, Health insurance programs, History, Military, National health care reform, Prenatal care

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1945. Purchase of hospital care: A bulletin for state agencies administering services for maternal and child health (including emergency maternal and infant care) crippled children and vocational rehabilitation. Washington, DC: Children's Bureau, U.S. Department of Labor, 34 pp.

Annotation: This bulletin advises state programs in maternal and child health, crippled children, and vocational rehabilitation on policies and requirements on purchasing in-hospital and out-patient hospital care for the populations that they serve.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Photocopy available at no charge.

Keywords: History, Hospital services, MCH services, Purchasing, Specifications, State agencies

U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau. 1944. History and functions of the Children's Bureau. Washington, DC: Children's Bureau, U.S. Department of Labor, 23 pp.

Annotation: This document relates the events and ideas that led to the creation of the Children's Bureau within the Department of Labor. It also describes the mission and purpose of the bureau and provides accounts of special events, conferences, and activities of the bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Children's Bureau, Federal agencies, History

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1937-1938. A historical summary of state services for children. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 4 pts. (Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau); no. 239; pt. 1 (Ohio), pt. 2 (New York); pt. 3 (Alabama), pt. 4 (Massachusetts))

Annotation: This set of publications, intended for students of public welfare administration, describes the development of state welfare programs in Ohio, New York, Alabama, and Massachusetts and provides a picture of the organization and services for children and families in each state. A publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alabama, Child welfare agencies, History, Massachusetts, New York, Ohio, Reports, State welfare agencies

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1936-1953. The child. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau; for sale by U.S. Government Printing Office, monthly. ([Children's Bureau publication])

Annotation: This monthly periodical provides articles about the health and welfare of children. Earlier years were subtitled Monthly Bulletin. The document is available electronically as part of the Home Economics Archive: Research, Tradition and History collection at Cornell University.

Contact: Home Economics Archive: Research, Tradition and History, Cornell University, Albert R. Mann Library, 260 Tower Road, Ithaca, NY 14853, Telephone: (607) 255-5406 Fax: (607) 255-0318 E-mail: mann_ref@cornell.edu Web Site: http://hearth.library.cornell.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child welfare, Children, History, Periodicals

Nelson E . 1933. Women at work: A century of industrial change. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 51 pp. ([Women's Bureau publication])

Taylor E. 1933. Children's progress 1833-1933. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 23 pp. ([Children's Bureau publication])

U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. 1933. Labor through the century: 1833-1933—An illustrated account as presented by the United States Department of Labor at the Century of Progress Exposition, Chicago 1933. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 46 pp.

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1930, 1933. Child labor: Facts and figures. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 133 pp. (Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau); no. 197)

Taylor E. 1930. In behalf of mothers and children: The story of the U.S. Children's Bureau. Washington, DC: National League of Women Voters, Child Welfare Committee, 48 pp.

Annotation: This pamphlet describes the history and work of the first seventeen years of the Children's Bureau, how mothers and children are reached by the Bureau, the work of the various departments of the Bureau, Bureau efforts addressing child labor, work for children with developmental disabilities and special health needs, work for children of single mothers, and efforts to inform the nation.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Children's Bureau, Child welfare, History

Adair FL, DeNormandie RL. 1926. The physician's part in a practical state program of prenatal care [and] Standards of prenatal care. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 19 pp. (Children's Bureau publication no. 157, separate no. 1)

Annotation: These articles come from the proceedings of a maternity and infancy conference of state directors in charge of the local administration of the Maternity and Infancy Act, 1926. The first describes the importance of prenatal care, defines standards for prenatal care, and describes aspects of a state plan for prenatal care. The second article further details standards of prenatal care regarding how and for what aspects should a patients health history be solicited, how and why blood pressure should be examined, vaginal examinations, pelvic measurements, blood and urine analysis, proper diet, dental care, care of the breasts, intercourse during pregnancy, the myth of maternal impressions, hygiene of the home, mental hygiene, and other concerns for prenatal care.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: History, Maternal health, Maternal mental health, Maternal nutrition, Prenatal care

Gies WJ. 1926. Dental education in the United States and Canada: A report to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. New York, NY: Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, ca. 665 pp. (Bulletin no. 19)

Annotation: This report examines the importance of dentistry as a healing science and an essential component of higher education in the health professions. Topics include a general history of dental education in North America and a discussion of the conditions in the practice of dentistry that determine its education requirements. Statistical statements and descriptive accounts of all the dental schools in the United States and Canada in 1925-26 are included, as well as a general plan for the reorganization of dental education to promote the development of dental practice as a division of health service.

Contact: Dalhousie University, DalSpace Institutional Repository, E-mail: dalspace@dal.ca Web Site: https://dalspace.library.dal.ca Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental education, Dental schools, Dentistry, Health professions, History, Oral health, Organizational change

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1926. State bureaus of child hygiene and dates of establishment. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 4 pp.

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1925-1928?. Division budgets. [Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau], 1 v.

U.S. Children's Bureau. [1912]. Establishment of the Children's Bureau. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Children's Bureau, 5 pp. ([Children's Bureau publication; no. 1])

Annotation: This publication gives the text of the legislation that established the U.S. Children's Bureau in 1912 and describes the background that led up to the legislation, Congress's intended scope of the bureau, and plans for immediate work, including a statistical handbook, a library of current publications, a clearinghouse for actual and pending legislation, an original investigation of infant mortality, birth registration, and the issuance of popular pamphlets. It is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children's Bureau, Federal legislation, History

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Bureau of Community Health Services. 1912-1974. The legislative history of the maternal and child health and crippled children's services program under Title V of the Social Security Act. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Bureau of Community Health Services, 1 v.

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1912-1968. Legislative history: Title V provisions of the Social Security Act, grants for maternal and child health, crippled children, and child welfare services. Rockville, MD: U.S. Children's Bureau, 1 v.

Baker EM. Crippled children. The Social Work Year Book. 1941 , 4 pp. (Reprinted for the Children's Bureau, United States Department of Labor)

Bierman JM. Maternal and child health. The Social Work Year Book. 1941 , 4 pp. (Reprinted for the Children's Bureau, United States Department of Labor)

Connecticut Department of Health Services, Public Health Education Section. Title V: A half century of achievement. Connecticut Health Bulletin. 99(2):110-135; 99(3):138-155. 1986,

Annotation: These two issues review the first half century of implementing Title V programs by the Connecticut Department of Maternal and Child Health Programs. They provide a chronology of events which led to the inclusion of health programs for mothers and children in the Social Security Act of 1935 and the subsequent success in Connecticut. They then review the first fifty years of the Social Security Act Title V, service to handicapped children, and maternal and child health programs in Connecticut. Improved pregnancy outcome initiatives and child day care licensing programs are also reviewed. The text of the child's bill of rights, signed by Herbert Hoover, is included.

Keywords: Child care, Child health, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Connecticut, History, Licensing, Maternal health, Pregnancy outcome, Social Security Act, Title V, Title V programs

Hutchins VL. Maternal and Child Health Bureau: Roots. Pediatrics. 94(5):695-699. November, 1994,

Steeves A, ed. A celebration of public health nursing. Connecticut Health Bulletin. 100(3):215-231. 1988.,

Annotation: This special issue of Connecticut Health Bulletin celebrates 100 years of public health nursing in the state of Connecticut. There are several articles looking at the past and present of public health nursing as well as some historical photographs.

Contact: Connecticut Department of Public Health, 410 Capitol Avenue, Hartford, CT 06134-0308, Telephone: (860) 509-8000 E-mail: webmaster.dph@po.state.ct.us Web Site: http://www.ct.gov/dph Price unknown.

Keywords: Connecticut, History, Home care, Nursing specialties, Public health nurses, Public health nursing

U.S. Children's Bureau. Anniversary issue: Sixty years of service to children–Children's Bureau: 1912-1972. Children Today. 1(2):1-40. March-April 1972,

Annotation: This special issues commemorates the 60th anniversary of the Children's Bureau. The history of the Bureau of reviewed along with its accomplishments. A history of child welfare since 1912 is also included. The contents also discuss UNICEF, working children and youth, parent and child centers, youth as advocates, research and advocacy, community needs assessment, and components of a child advocacy program. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: DHEW (OCD) 72-14.

Keywords: Advocacy, Anniversaries, Assessment, Child advocacy, Child labor, Child welfare, Children's Bureau, History, International health, International organizations, Public health

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. MCH timeline: History, legacy and resources for education and practice. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau,

Annotation: This Web site traces the history of maternal and child health history in the United States, with in-depth modules on topics such as MCH 101, MCH systems of care, infant mortality, MCH performance and accountability, oral histories, and genetic services. It covers decades from the 1790's to the present, and describes significant events in the areas of public health and medicine and government and policy.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Federal MCH programs, History, Infant health, Maternal health, Public health, United States

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.