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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Child Developmental Screening Bibliography

Child Developmental Screening

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 43 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog. It supplements the 1997 NCEMCH publication MCH Program Interchange: Focus on Abstinence Education. It covers materials focused on abstinence-only education. Materials on comprehensive sexuality education are listed in a companion bibliography.

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 43 records.

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2014. Environmental scan: State strategies and initiatives to improve developmental and autism screening and early identification systems. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report provides initial findings of a search of state and other documents related to developmental screening activities and of the Title V Information System online database to identify states with priority needs and performance measures related to developmental screening and early identification, with a focus on children with autism spectrum disorders and developmental disabilities. It describes the Autism Cares Act and strategies to increase developmental screening and improve systems. It discusses issues of data collection, measurement, and infrastructure; coordinating systems and services; and challenges and barriers. State highlights are provided. An accompanying fact sheet lists state performance measures and objectives related to developmental screening and early identification.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism spectrum disorders, Child development disorders, Developmental screening, State programs

Johnson-Staub C. 2014. First steps for early success: State strategies to support develpmental screening in early childhood settings. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document discusses current trends to access to developmental screening, private and federal efforts to increase access (including Head Start, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Parts B and C, Medicaid and Title V of the Maternal and Child Health Block Grants), and challenges in expanding access. It then discusses state policies supporting developmental screening in child care and early education (including licensing, subsidies, pre-kindergarten, quality initiatives and service coordination) and state policy recommendations.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Developmental screening, Public policies, State programs, Young children

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) services in Medicaid: Resources for families (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find care, services, and support and websites about Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) Services in Medicaid. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bibliographies, Child health supervision, Consumer education materials, Developmental screening, EPSDT, Electronic publications, Families, Medicaid

Zero to Three. (2013). Improving access to early identification and intervention: 211 LA County developmental screening and care coordination. [Washington, DC]: Zero to Three, 6 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief focuses on the efforts of 211 L.A. County's Developmental Screening and Care Coordination Program, which works to encourage partnerships between health professionals and community organizations to identify children at risk for developmental delays. The brief provides information about the program and about the importance of identifying developmental delays early. A personal story about a parent and child who received help from the program is also included.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child development, Children with developmental disabilities, Collaboration, Community programs, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Health services, Infant development, Infants, Infants with developmental disabilities, Screening, Diagnosis, Treatment, Service coordination, Young children

Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative. 2012–. Well-Visit Planner™. Portland, OR: Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, 1 v.

Annotation: This website provides tools designed to customize, tailor, and improve the quality of well-child care for infants and young children (ages 4 months to 6 years). The tool engages parents as proactive partners in planning and conducting well-child visits using a three-step process (answer a questionnaire, pick your priorities, and get your visit guide). It also has the capacity to integrate clinically-relevant information directly into the electronic health record. Contents include child and family health screeners, anticipatory guidance and family education, and parent and provider visit guides. A one-page overview and a 5-minute video tutorial are also available. The content is available in English and Spanish. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, E-mail: info@cahmi.org Web Site: http://www.cahmi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family centered care, Infants, Medical records, Parent professional relations, Planning, Quality assurance, Spanish language materials, Well child care, Young children

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2012. Autism A.L.A.R.M.. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provided health professionals with basic information about the prevalence of It provides the surveillance and screening algorithm.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Children with special health care needs, Developmental screening, Diagnosis, Monitoring, Referrals, Screening, Treatment

Bethell C. 2012. Patient centered quality improvement of well-child care: Final report. Portland, OR: Oregon Health and Science University, Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, 22 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This final report describes a research study to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and impact of three different patient-centered strategies for improving the quality and equity of preventive and developmental services provided to young children during well-child visits. Topics include updated anticipatory guidance for well-child visits, communications between parents and health care providers, and parents' perceptions of overall quality of healthcare visits for their children. Report contents include an introduction to research problem, a review of the literature, the study design and methods, detailed findings, discussion and interpretation of the findings, a list of products developed during the project, as well as references. Appendices provide examples and overviews of selected project elements. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Anticipatory guidance, Final reports, MCH research, Parent participation, Parent professional relations, Patient satisfaction, Quality assurance, Well child care

Honigfeld L, Fenick A, Carvel KM, Vater S, Ward-Zimmerman B. 2012. Mid-level developmental and behavioral assessments: Between screening and evaluation. Farmington, CT: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 22 pp. (Impact)

Annotation: This report discusses the effectiveness of mid-level developmental assessment (MLDA) for children in Connecticut who are at risk for developmental or behavioral problems. MLDA is defined as the expedient assessment of a child with a behavioral or developmental health concerns identified through screening. The report provides information about three MLDA programs, discusses the results of MLDA, and provides considerations for building an MLDA system.

Contact: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 270 Farmington Avenue, Suite 367, Farmington, CT 06032, Telephone: (860) 679-1519 Fax: (860) 679-1521 E-mail: info@chdi.org Web Site: http://www.chdi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child development, Development disabilities, Developmental screening, High risk children, Service delivery systems

Minnesota Department of Health. [2011]. Developmental and social-emotional screening of young children (0-6 years of age) in Minnesosta. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health,

Annotation: This website provides an overview of developmental and mental health screening of children (ages 0 through 6) in the state of Minnesota; online access to screening instruments and state requirements; and a training module for clinics and health care providers. The site describes the review process for screening tools used in Minnesota's public programs; provides answers to frequently asked questions; and offers additional training resources such as web training videos and power point presentations. Links to related information produced by the Minnesota Department of Health are provided as well.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, P.O. Box 64975, St. Paul, MN 55164-0975, Telephone: (651) 201-5000 Secondary Telephone: (888) 345-0823 Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Developmental screening, Minnesota, Public health services, Screening, Screening tests, State programs, Training materials, Young children

Aakre KJ, Paul K, Barry S. 2010, 2011. Developmental screening "preferred tool list" for children birth to three years. Burlington, VT: Vermont Child Health Improvement Program, 27 pp.

Annotation: This document provides a preferred list of developmental screening instruments for use in primary care in children in the birth to three population in Vermont. A chart describes the recommended tools outlining information on population group, the screening tool name and website, age range, administration time, electronic format, cost to practice, tool type, language(s) available, reading level, psychometric properties, and strengths/limitations and comments.

Contact: Vermont Child Health Improvement Program, University of Vermont College of Medicine, St. Josephs 7, UHC Campus, One South Prospect Street, Burlington, VT 05401, Telephone: (802) 656-8210 Fax: (802) 656-8368 Web Site: http://www.med.uvm.edu/vchip Available from the website.

Keywords: Developmental screening, Developmental stages, Infants, Resources for professionals, Toddlers

Kenney GM, Pelletier JE. 2010. Improving the lives of young children: The role of developmental screening in Medicaid and CHIP. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 19 pp. (Brief 1)

Annotation: This brief focuses on gaps in the receipt of developmental screening among children from families with low incomes. The brief introduces the issue, discusses Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) policy frameworks, and presents state Medicaid and CHIP policies that promote receipt of developmental screenings.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children's Health Insurance Program, Developmental screening, Early childhood development, Health promotion, Infant development, Low income groups, Medicaid, Public policy

Barry SE, Paul k, Aakre K. 2009. Developmental and autism screening in primary care. Burlington, VT: Vermont Child Health Improvement Program, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a survey of Vermont health care practices that provide primary care to children from birth to age six conducted to better understand current developmental and autism screening processes and referral patterns as well as barriers and facilitating practices. Developed by the Vermont Child Health Improvement Program (VCHIP) at the University of Vermont in collaboration with the Vermont Agency of Human Services, Office of Vermont Health Access, and professional societies, the survey was administered to 103 primary care practices by mail, fax, online, and telephone during 2009. The results of the survey, including response rates and findings according to type of screening, are summarized, and tables are provided to illustrate survey findings. The authors conclude by describing the wide variation in surveillance and screening practices in Vermont and suggest opportunities for improvement based on the results of the research.

Contact: Vermont Child Health Improvement Program, University of Vermont College of Medicine, St. Josephs 7, UHC Campus, One South Prospect Street, Burlington, VT 05401, Telephone: (802) 656-8210 Fax: (802) 656-8368 Web Site: http://www.med.uvm.edu/vchip Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Developmental disabilities, Developmental screening, Screening, State surveys, Vermont

Kaye N, May J. 2009. Findings from the ABCD Screening Academy: State policy improvements that support effective identification of children at-risk for developmental delay . Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 9 pp. (Briefing)

Annotation: This brief presents policy improvements affecting screening in primary care that were identified by teams from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, who worked together for 14 months to make policy and practice improvements needed to make the use of validated screening tools in well child care a part of standard practice. The brief presents an overview of results, improving coverage (benefits and eligibility), reimbursement, improving program performance, and Oregon's approach to policy improvement.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Child developmental disorders, Child health, Health supervision, High risk children, Oregon, Primary care, Public policy, Screening, State programs, Well child care

Kaye N, May J. 2009. Findings from the ABCD Screening Academy: State strategies to support practice changes that improve identification of children at risk for or with developmental delays. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 pp. (Briefing)

Annotation: This brief examines the efforts of the ABCD Screening and Practice Academy to make policy and practice improvements needed to change the use of validated screening tools as part of well-child care from best practice to standard of practice. The ABCD Academy works to improve the identification of children with or at risk for developmental delays. Topics covered include planning to support statewide practice improvement, tools to support practice improvement, and how partnerships in Minnesota have supported practice change.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Children with special health care needs, Developmental screening, Health care delivery, High risk children, Minnesota, Public policy, Screening tests, State initiatives

Kaye N, May J, Reuland CP. 2009. Measurement to support effective identification of children at risk for developmental delay. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 9 pp. (State health policy briefing)

Annotation: This brief examines the efforts of 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico to use measurement to support policy and practice changes that improve pediatric primary care health professionals' identification of children with or at risk for developmental delay. The brief discusses screening measurement approaches, additional evaluative activities, and how Michigan used measurement in policy and practice improvement.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child developmental disorders, Child health, High risk children, Michigan, Primary care, Public policy, Screening, State programs, Well child care

Staker M. 2009. Project EAGLE - Central Intake and Referral System: Final report. Kansas City, KS: University of Kansas Medical Center Research Institute, 91 pp.

Annotation: This final report provides information about Project EAGLE -- Central Intake and Referral System, which screens for multiple risks in families in Kansas City, Kansas, with infants and children from birth through age 5 to provide timely referrals to address their needs in an effort to ensure that children at greatest risk for poor health and academic outcome receive the early intervention services that will support future success. Contents include a description of the purpose of the project, goals and objectives, methodology, evaluation, results and outcomes, publications and products, dissemination and utilization of results, future plans and follow-up. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Developmental screening, Early intervention, Final reports, Health screening, High risk children, High risk infants, Infant health, Kansas, Referrals, School readiness, Vulnerability

West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, Birth to Three. 2009. Assessment instruments approved to be appropriate for screening or evaluating the needs of infants and toddlers. Charleston, WV: West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, Birth to Three, 16 pp.

Annotation: This list of assessment instruments has been approved by Zero to Three in West Virginia as being appropriate for screening and evaluating the needs of infants and toddlers. It includes the names of sixty assessment tools, and provides descriptive information on the format, type of instrument, and developmental domains assessed. The criteria used in selecting the assessment instruments are also provided.

Contact: West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, State Capitol Complex, Building 3, Room 206, Charleston, WV 25305, Telephone: (304) 558-0684 Fax: (304) 558-1130 Web Site: http://www.wvdhhr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Evaluation methods, Infants, Screening, Young children

Drotar D, Stancin T, Dworkin P, Haran C, ed. 2008. Pediatric developmental screening: Understanding and selecting screening instruments. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund,

Annotation: This electronic manual is intended to inform practitioners' selection and application of instruments used in screening for developmental problems in young children. The screening instruments reviewed are applicable to a range of practice settings. The manual is divided into two main sections: (1) defining your practice's screening needs and (2) guides to facilitate your choice and use of screening instruments. Five appendices are included: (1) methods for instrument review, (2) summary of references, (3) references on developmental screening, (4) items considered on standards for reporting studies of diagnostic accuracy, and (5) resources for implementing developmental surveillance and screening.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Developmental disabilities, Developmental screening, Screening tests, Young children

Oregon ABCD Early Childhood Early Screening Initiative. 2008. Improving early childhood standardized surveillance and screening practices in Oregon. [Portland, OR]: Oregon Public Health Division, 12 pp.

Annotation: This tool for clinicians describes screening practices for identification of children up to age 5 with developmental, behavioral, and/or psychosocial problems that will target them for further evaluation, early intervention, or early childhood special education. Each screening practice includes a discussion of criteria and recommended tools.

Contact: Oregon Public Health Division, 800 N.E. Oregon Street, Suite 930, Portland, OR 97232, Telephone: (971) 673-1222 Secondary Telephone: (971) 673-0372 Fax: (971) 673-1299 Web Site: http://public.health.oregon.gov/Pages/Home.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Developmental disabilities, Infants, Oregon, Screening tests, Young children

Ringwalt S, comp. 2008. Developmental screening and assessment instruments with an emphasis on social and emotional development for young children ages birth through five. Chapel Hill, NC: National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, 19 pp.

Annotation: This list of developmental screening instruments for infants and young children (from birth through age 5) includes instruments that address multiple developmental domains as well as those that focus on the social-emotional developmental domain. The screening instruments are further subdivided into those that must be administered by professionals and those that may be completed by family members or other caregivers. Information for each instrument, including a description, the age range for which the instrument is validated, the time required to administer the instrument, scoring procedures, psychometric properties, requirements for administrators, and contact information.

Contact: Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, Campus Box 8040, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040, Telephone: (919) 962-2001 Secondary Telephone: (919) 843-3269 Fax: 919.966.7463 E-mail: ectacenter@unc.edu Web Site: http://ectacenter.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Developmental screening, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Infants, Social behavior, Young children

Sells J. 2008. Medical providers and the Birth to Three Early Intervention Program: Key partners in the need for systems changes to improve outcomes for children—Summary report and recommendations. King County, WA: Medical Provider-Early Intervention Partnership Project, SOAR and the King County Board for Developmental Disabilities/King County Interagency Coordinating Council, 79 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the the Medical Provider-Early Intervention Partnership Project to build partnerships with medical providers that encourages and facilitates their ability to successfully identify and refer families into early intervention services and for wider partnerships throughout King County, Washington. Contents include perspectives of early intervention providers and medical providers, state opportunities in Washington, a review of the literature on developmental services and systems change, and recommendations.

Contact: Docs for Tots, 28 Breeley Boulevard, Melville, NY 11747 , Telephone: (856)362.4868 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: dft@docsfortots.org Web Site: http://docsfortots.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Developmental screening, Early intervention, Family centered services, Health services delivery, Infants, Physician patient relations, Program descriptions, Service integration, Washington, Young children

Sices L. 2007. Developmental screening in primary care: The effectiveness of current practice and recommendations for improvement. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes research on the effectiveness of current efforts by primary care health professionals to detect developmental delays in early childhood and considers ways to improve outcomes for young children and families. The report is based on a review of the literature to (1) assess the effectiveness of primary care practices in identifying developmental delays in young children, (2) describe practices related to identifying developmental delays, and (3) identify factors that affect practice. An executive summary provides key findings from existing research and recommendations for future research and policy development. The report also includes information about the study methods, results, and conclusions; and notes.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Developmental screening, Early childhood development, Primary care, Young children

American Academy of Pediatrics, Medical Home Initiatives for Children with Special Needs Project Advisory Committee. 2006. Identifying infants and young children with developmental disorders in the medical home: An algorithm for developmental surveillance and screening. Pediatrics. 118(1): 405-420. July 2006, (Policy statement)

Annotation: This policy statement provides an algorithm, or a decision tree, as a strategy to support health care professionals in developing a pattern and practice for addressing developmental concerns in children from birth through 3 years of age. It discusses using developmental surveillance at every preventive visit, use of a screening tool at 9-, 18-, and 24- or 30-month visits and for those whose surveillance yields concerns about delayed or disordered development. Further topics include (1) when to provide further developmental and medical evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment, including early developmental intervention; and (2) identifying children diagnosed with developmental disorders as children with special health care needs, and (3) initiating chronic-condition management. The statement includes a figure illustrating the algorithm, an extensive table outlining developmental screening tools, and an additional table providing codes for developmental screening. Recommendations are outlined for the medical home, for policy and advocacy, and for research and development. References conclude the statement.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child development services, Child health, Developmental screening, Early intervention, Infant development, Infant health, Medical home, Primary prevention, Resources for professionals, Surveillance, Well child care

Mayer R, Anastasi J, Clark EM. 2006. What to expect and when to seek help: Bright Futures developmental tools for families and providers. Washington, DC: National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, with National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 4 items.

Annotation: This packet includes four tools on social and emotional development during infancy (birth through 12 months), early childhood (ages 1-4), middle childhood (ages 5-10), and adolescence (ages 11-21). The publications, intended for families and health professionals, provide information about what to expect and when to seek help for each developmental stage. Based on Bright Futures in Practice, the development tools offer a framework for health professionals and families to begin a conversation together about how best to support healthy social and emotional development in infants, children, and adolescents. The tools are part of a coordinated set of print and Web materials, including the Referral Tool for Providers and the electronic Community Services Locator. The tools encourage familes who have concerns about their child to ask questions and offer a number of tips for when, where, and how to seek help through local, state, or national resources. The tools are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Bright Futures at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1242, Telephone: (202) 784-9772 E-mail: brightfutures@ncemch.org Web Site: http://www.brightfutures.org/georgetown.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Child development, Child health, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Families, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Social problems, Spanish language materials

[New Mexico] Early Childhood Action Network, Developmental Screening Committee. 2006. Improving developmental care for young children and their families in New Mexico: Building a strong early childhood system to promote healthy development in children birth to five and to ensure that no child reaches school with an undetected development condition. [no place, NM]: Early Childhood Action Network, 16 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on strategies identified by New Mexico's Early Childhood Action Network's developmental steering committee to (1) define a statewide, systematic approach to ensure that (1) every infant and child from birth through age 5 receives periodic and high-quality developmental screening and (2) all children with developmental concerns receive timely and high-quality assessment, referral, and early intervention services. The report discusses the importance of developmental screening, strengthening screening services in New Mexico, and recommendations for developmental care services. The report also discusses five key strategy areas identified by the committee: (1) state-system alignment; (2) promotion of public awareness of child development; (3) developmental and observation screening; (4) referral, assessment, and evaluation; and (5) early and specialized intervention.

Contact: New Mexico Early Childhood Action Network, NM E-mail: ecan.nm@gmail.com Web Site: http://www.earlychildhoodnm.com Available from the website.

Keywords: New Mexico, Assessment, Child development, Developmental disabilities, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Infant development, Referral, Screening, State programs

Reuland CP, Bethell C. 2006. Measuring and evaluating developmental services: Strategies and lessons from the ABCD II Consortium states. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 156 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides information for states seeking to implement efforts similar to those of the Assuring Better Child Health and Development Initiative (ABCD II) program. ABCD II is designed to strengthen primary health care services and systems that support the social and emotional development of infants and children from birth through age 3 whose health care is covered by state programs, especially Medicaid. The paper provides information on (1) methodologies and opportunities for evaluation measures related to screening children's social and emotional development, referral, and follow-up care for children identified as at risk and (2) real-world examples and lessons learned from the ABCD II states in their measurement efforts. The paper discusses global issues that apply to any measurement activity, description of guidelines and approaches in three standardized evaluation measures used across all the ABCD II staes, information about additional evaluation methods used by ABCD II states, and potential areas of leverage for state Medicaid agencies to implement evaluation measures.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Early childhood development, Health care systems, Health services, High risk children, High risk infants, Infant development, Infant health, Initiatives, Low income groups, Medicaid, Program evaluation, State health insurance programs, State programs

Glascoe FP, Shapiro HL. 2005-. Introduction to developmental and behavioral screening. St. Petersburg, FL: Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics Online, 1 v.

Annotation: This online tutorial provides information about techniques for screening children for developmental, behavioral, and emotional problems which can be used effectively and efficiently in the pediatric office setting. It includes background information on screening, an annotated list of developmental and behavioral/emotional screening tools, and parent handouts.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, E-mail: info@dbpeds.org Web Site: https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/Committees-Councils-Sections/sodbp/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior development, Child development, Developmental screening, Emotional development

Meisels SJ, Atkins-Burnett S. 2005. Developmental screening in early childhood: A guide. (5th ed.). Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 118 pp.

Annotation: This book discusses the basics of screening used to identify which children may have learning problems or disabilities, social or emotional concerns, or developmental problems and offers advice for selecting an appropriate screening instrument and for setting up a screening program. It is intended for early childhood teachers, trainers, and administrators; policy makers; and those teaching in community colleges and undergraduate and graduate programs. Contents include the purpose and scope of developmental screening, selecting a screening instrument, following up on screening, setting up a screening program, and screening limitations. References and a bibliography are included as well as appendices with instruments for developmental and social and emotional screening, a discussion of reliability and validity, a sample parent questionnaire, and a position statement from the National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Contact: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1313 L Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 232-8777 Secondary Telephone: (800) 424-2460 Fax: (202) 328-1846 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.naeyc.org $12.00, plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Assessment, Child development, Developmental screening, Emotional development, Learning, Questionnaires, Screening tests, Social skills, Young children

Reuland CP, Bethell C. 2005. Key measurement issues in screening, referral, and follow-up care for young children's social and emotional development. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 32 pp.

Annotation: This paper outlines methods and issues for state Assuring Better Child Health and Development Initiative (ABCD) II projects to consider as they develop and implement three common measures. They are (1) the percent of children 0-3 years of age screened to identify concerns related to social and emotional development; (2) the percent of children 0-3 years of age referred for services to prevent or treat concerns related to delays in social and emotional development; and (3) the percent of children 0-3 years of age treated for delays in social and emotional development, including treatment to prevent such delays, from primary care providers and other referred healthcare providers. The report contains additional sections on global measurement issues and next steps for the states in developing and implementing a measurement methodology.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Delayed development, Developmental screening, Emotional development, Infant development, Mental health, Program development, Psychosocial development, State programs, Young children

Smith PK. 2005. Enhancing child development services in Medicaid managed care: A best clinical and administrative practices toolkit. Lawrenceville, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 62 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit illustrates experiences from 11 Medicaid managed care organizations in piloting activities to improve early childhood screening and anticipatory guidance, with an emphasis on preventive pediatric care. It reviews the BCAP (Best Clinical and Administrative Practices) Quality Framework and highlights strategies to improve the delivery of child development services, including early identification of developmental disabilities, improving outreach to members, enhancing provider partnerships, improving reimbursement and referral practices, and recognizing potential returns on investment. Case studies illustrate how plans applied the BCAP Quality Framework to improve child development services in Medicaid managed care.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Child development, Early childhood development, Health care delivery, Medicaid managed care, Model programs, Pediatric care, Program improvement, Screening

Vermont Department of Developmental and Mental Health Services. 2005. Finding help for young children with social-emotional-behavioral challenges and their families: The Vermont Children's UPStream Services (CUPS) handbook. Waterbury, VT: Vermont Department of Developmental and Mental Health Services, 249 pp.

Annotation: This guide, which is geared for anyone concerned with the emotional and social welfare of infants and young children, focuses on specific difficulties that might affect an infant's or young child's natural developmental progression and on providing guidance on how to get support when needed. The guide is divided into 15 chapters, organized under four broad themes: the context for family life, specialized assessment and early intervention, understanding and responding to difficult family circumstances, and understanding and responding to young children in traumatic circumstances. Each chapter includes an introduction to the topic, general information and specific points to consider, and the listing of several recommended resources for more information. The guide includes three appendices: Vermont general resources, national organizations and Web sites, and About the Vermont Children's UPstream Services team.

Contact: Vermont Department of Mental Health, 108 Cherry Street-PO Box 70, Burlington, VT 05402, Telephone: (802) 652-2000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 464-4343 Fax: 802- 652-2005 Web Site: http://mentalhealth.vermont.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Behavior problems, Child health, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Emotional development, Emotional instability, Families, Family support, High risk children, High risk infants, Infant health, Mental health services, Social adjustment, Social services, State programs, Vermont, Young children

Bergman D. 2004. Screening for behavioral developmental problems: Issues, obstacles, and opportunities for change. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 32 pp.

Annotation: This technical assistance paper is designed to provide states with a framework for evaluating developmental screening tools for young children so that state officials are equipped to make informed decisions and to work with pediatricians, parents, and other local stakeholders in strengthening services to young children. The paper examines issues related to screening children for developmental disabilities and problems, discusses the ways in which screening tools differ from one another and the challenges that are often faced by those working to integrate screening tools in medical practices, and includes summary information for 17 different tools. The paper includes two appendices: strategies for selecting a tool and screening tool matrix. The paper includes endnotes.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior development, Child development, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Developmental screening, Evaluation, Health services, Screening tests, Young children

Center for Health Care Strategies. 2004. Improving developmental screening: One child at a time. Lawrenceville, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 26 pp.

Annotation: This summary and case study describe a pilot project by Molina Healthcare of Michigan to improve Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) rates and early childhood developmental screening at 11 provider practices using the Best Clinical and Administrative Practices (BCAP) framework. Sample materials from the project, called Baby Steps Toward Health, include outreach materials on well-child visits for parents and provider education materials about EPSDT components, proper documentation, coding, and referral sources for children with developmental delays. A chart outlining the Medicaid well-child check-ups timeline: birth to 21 is also provided.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Child development, Children, Developmental screening, EPSDT, Michigan, Pilot projects, Program descriptions

Child Trends. 2004. Early childhood measures profiles. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 404 pp.

Annotation: As part of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation's (ASPE's) ongoing support for federal collaboration on early childhood research through the Science and Ecology of Early Development (SEED) initiative, ASPE and the Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (ACYF) contracted with Child Trends to develop profiles of early childhood measures. This project produced a compendium of early childhood assessments commonly used to measure domains of development, including language and literacy, cognition, mathematics, social-emotional competency, and approaches to learning. Various types of ongoing observational assessments were also included. A profile of each assessment includes the purpose of the measure, key constructs, administration, and reliability information. These profiles were developed as a resource for a workshop funded by ASPE, ACYF, and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, designed to bring together a multidisciplinary group of experts to advise the federal partners on the measurement and assessment of learning and development in early childhood. This compendium provides information on the current state of the field in the assessment of child outcomes, particularly in large-scale and intervention studies.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Policy Information Center, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Room 415F, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 690-6445 Secondary Telephone: (202) 690-7858 Fax: (202) 401-6228 E-mail: pic@hhs.gov Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov/pic Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Language, Learning, Literacy, Measures, Research, Social skills, Young children

Early Head Start National Resource Center. 2004. A holistic approach to health and safety. Washington, DC: U.S. Head Start Bureau, 28 pp. (Technical assistance paper; no. 7)

Annotation: This report considers how Early Head Start and Migrant and Seasonal Head Start programs can have a positive and lasting effect on the healthy growth and development of infants, toddlers, and their families. The report discusses systems that support health services and also touches upon the following issues: (1) health services for pregnant women, (2) oral health for infants and toddlers, (3) health screening for developmental, sensory, and behavioral concerns, (4) health care in rural communities, (5) Migrant and Seasonal Head Start programs, (6) infant and child mental health, (7) children with special heath care needs, and (8) poverty and obesity. The report contains five appendices: (1) prenatal worksheet, (2) newborn health visit, (3) nursing control form, (4) health screening and immunization record, and (5) additional resources.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Child development, Child health, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Developmental screening, Early Head Start, Families, Head Start, Health care systems, Health services, Infant development, Infant health, Low income groups, Mental health, Migrant health programs, Obesity, Oral health, Poverty, Pregnant women, Rural communities, Sensory impairments, Young children

Halfon N, Russ S, Regalado M. 2004. Building a model system of developmental services in Orange County. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities, 112 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the existing system of screening, surveillance, assessment, and intervention for children with developmental, behavioral, and mental problems in Orange County, CA. It identifies gaps in existing services, barriers to service utilization, and systems issues which currently prevent optimal service delivery; as well as develops a vision and a strategic plan for building a model system of developmental services. Discussion includes school readiness indicators, prevalence of neurodevelopmental problems, special education, children in foster care, preschool nurses, and provider capacity. Methodology used in the study is also discussed, along with examples of national developmental services best practices models.

Contact: UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities, University of California, Los Angeles, 10990 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 900, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-2583 Fax: (310) 312-9210 E-mail: chcfc@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthychild.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, California, Child development, Children with developmental disabilities, Developmental screening, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Health services delivery, Local initiatives, Model programs, Program development, Program evaluation, School readiness, Service delivery systems, Service integration, Utilization review, Young children

Lorenzo SB. 2003–. Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) services in Medicaid: Knowledge path (4th ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, (Hiscock Collection; related)

Annotation: This knowledge path is a guide to resources about providing and strengthening Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT) services in Medicaid. Contents include guidelines for the frequency, timing, and content of health-promotion and disease-prevention services for infants, children, and adolescents. Separate sections present resources for professionals (health professionals, program administrators, policymakers, researchers) and for families. A special topics area lists resources about oral health services as part of the EPSDT benefit. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bibliographies, Children, EPSDT, Knowledge paths, Medicaid, Oral health

Kisker EE, Boller K, Nagatoshi C, Sciarrino C, Jethwani V, Zavitsky T, Ford M, Love JM. 2003. Resources for measuring services and outcomes in Head Start programs serving infants and toddlers. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 243 pp.

Annotation: This document contains resources to help Head Start programs that serve pregnant women and families with infants and toddlers develop a performance measurement plan and carry out data collection that will support their continuous program improvement efforts. It discusses the importance and development of a comprehensive plan and presents profiles of instruments that may be useful to programs. Contents include sections on performance measurement, formulating a performance measurement plan, information and instruments as well as references. Appendices include a worksheet to help develop a comprehensive plan for gathering and analyzing data, a performance measures framework for Head Start programs serving infants and toddlers, and a chart and extensive lists of measures used in the National Early Head Start research and evaluation project to screen and assess children and families.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Early Head Start, Early childhood development, Early intervention services, Head Start, Infants, Measures, Pregnant women, Program development, Program evaluation, Resource materials, Strategic plans, Toddlers

Pelletier H, Abrams M. 2003. ABCD: Lessons from a four-state consortium. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 41 pp.

Annotation: This paper is designed to highlight lessons learned from the Assuring Better Child Health and Development (ABCD) project, which was launched in 1999 by the Commonwealth Fund and which is dedicated to strengthening the capacity of the health care system to improve the delivery of early childhood development services for low-income families through the Medicaid system. The first section includes an overview of ABCD projects in four states (North Carolina, Utah, Vermont, and Washington). The second section describes the lessons learned across the four states. The paper also includes information about the next phase of the project. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the paper. An appendix includes contact information for individuals involved in the project.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child development services, Developmental screening, Early childhood development, Health care systems, Low income groups, Medicaid, North Carolina, Utah, Vermont, Washington, Young children

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and Casey Family Programs. 2003. Early childhood measurement toolkit: Instrumentation and recommendations from the Starting Early Starting Smart program. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; Seattle, WA: Casey Family Programs, 23 pp.

Annotation: This tool kit is a summary of lessons learned about the utility and feasibility of measures of family and child outcomes that were used in the Starting Early Starting Smart (SESS) multi-site study. SESS targets families with very young children who were at risk for delayed social-emotional, language, and physical development owing to to risk factors such as caregiver substance abuse, immigrant status, or poverty. The tool kit seeks to (1) introduce the SESS program and the process of designing the instrument package, (2) identify categories of criteria for assessing the usefulness and feasibility of instruments in field evaluation and program monitoring settings, (3) identify and summarize the measures that were applied in the SESS study, and (4) summarize the experience of program providers and researchers with each instrument. The summary provides assessment and recommendations with respect to pragmatic criteria of usefulness and feasibility as well as traditional scientific criteria. Measures covered child and adult behavioral health, language development, parenting, and home environment.

Contact: National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information, Telephone: (800) 729-6686 Secondary Telephone: (800) 487-4889 Web Site: http://ncadi.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Caregivers, Community programs, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Families, Federal programs, High risk children, Immigrants, Language, Measures, Poverty, Research, Screening, Social skills, Substance abuse, Tests, Young children

Jellinek MJ, Patel BP, Froehle MC, eds. 2002. Bright Futures in practice: Mental health—Volume II. Tool kit. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 148 pp.

Annotation: This companion volume to the Bright Futures in Practice: Mental Health -- Volume 1. Practice Guide contains tools to assist in mental health screening, education, and health care management for infants, children, and adolescents from birth to age 21. The toolkit is divided into two sections, for health professionals and for families, and contains items such as assessment tools, checklists, sample forms and questions, and other tools. Each section is organized developmentally with tools to address specific problems and disorders. Topics covered include documentation for reimbursement, helping siblings adjust to a new baby, preparing children for school, the stages of substance and other abuse, child maltreatment, learning problems and disorders, and mood disorders.

Contact: Bright Futures at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1242, Telephone: (202) 784-9772 E-mail: brightfutures@ncemch.org Web Site: http://www.brightfutures.org/georgetown.html Available from the website. Document Number: BF0900-003 (2 v. set); ISBN 1-57285-073-6.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Adolescents, Assessment, Bright Futures, Child health supervision, Child health supervision, Child mental health, Consumer education materials, Developmental stages, Diagnosis, Guidelines, Infants, Mental health, Primary care, Psychosocial development, Resources for professionals, Socialization, Young children

VanLandeghem K, Curtis D, Abrams M. 2002. Reasons and strategies for strengthening childhood development services in the healthcare system. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 30 pp.

Annotation: This document provides a framework for the provision of child development services in the health care system, offers strategies for strengthening child development services, and identifies examples of promising practices at the state, community, and primary care levels. Additional topics include an outline of preventive child development and challenges to integrating child development services in the health care system. The appendix provides an overview of eight developmental screening tools including age, staff requirements, cost, languages, and reading levels.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Child development screening, Child development services, Early childhood development, Local initiatives, Primary care, Screening tests, State programs, Young children

Dunst CJ, Trivette CM, Hill G. A universal checklist for identifying infants and toddlers eligible for early intervention. TRACE Practice Guide: Referral. 2(1):1-6. November 2007.,

Annotation: This guide describes the development of and prescribes implementation methods for a universal checklist for identifying infants and toddlers who may be eligible for early intervention. It is designed to facilitate and streamline the identification of potentially eligible children without the need to administer screening or development tests, and to be used by primary referral sources such as health professionals and child care providers.

Contact: Tracking, Referral and Assessment Center for Excellence, Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute, 8 Elk Mountain Road, Asheville, NC 28804, E-mail: dunst@puckett.org Web Site: http://www.tracecenter.info Available from the website.

Keywords: Developmental screening, Early Intervention, Guidelines, Infants, Toddlers, Young children

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.