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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Culturally Competent Services Bibliography

Culturally Competent Services

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 61 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published in the last ten years that discuss assessing services for cultural sensitivity, developing culturally sensitive materials, and providing services in a multicultural health care context.

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 61 records.

Partnership for the Public's Health. n.d.. Tips and tools: Working effectively across languages. Oakland, CA: Partnership for the Public's Health, 15 pp.

Annotation: This publication, which is written in both English and Spanish on facing pages, is designed to help groups reach across differences that might otherwise obscure talents, perspectives, and contributions of people who have much to offer in making our communities safer and healthier. The publication includes an overview of the Cultural Competency Sub-Committee of the Partnership for the Public's Health (PPH), the subcommittee's guiding principles, PPH's language policy, information on providing translation and interpretation services, guidelines for working with interpretation and translation agencies, guidelines for facilitators working in multi-lingual settings using simultaneous interpretation, and guidelines for selecting interpretation equipment.

Contact: Partnership for the Public's Health, 180 Grand Avenue, Suite 750 , Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 451-8600 Fax: (510) 451-8606 E-mail: ccastro-rojas@PartnershipPH.org Web Site: http://www.partnershipph.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Culturally competent services, Guidelines, Language, Spanish language materials, Translation

U.S. Office of Minority Health. 2015. Promoting healthy choices and community changes: An e-learning program for promotores de salud. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of Minority Health, 1 v.

Annotation: This course for promotores de salud (community health workers) comprises four units about understanding healthy choices, helping people make healthy choices, understanding community change, and helping people make community change. The course can by used by individuals or by groups of individuals. Contents include a video introduction; quizzes; stories; examples; and handouts that summarize each unit including key points, definitions, and questions to consider and discuss. Users can choose to answer the questions at the end of each unit and print a certificate of completion or receive a certificate by email. The units can be completed in sequence or in any order and in whole or in part. The course is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health, The Tower Building, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2882 Secondary Telephone: (240) 453-2883 Fax: (240) 453-2883 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Community health workers, Decision making, Health behavior, Hispanic Americans, Social change, Spanish language materials, Training

Desiderio G, Garrido M, Garcia M, Eisler A. 2014. Lessons learned in providing health care services for Native youth. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 7 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes agency efforts to provide health care services for Native youth and their lessons learned. Topics include health issues Native youth commonly face, ways youth use health services, youth-friendly services and ways to provide them, and integrating Native culture and traditional practices with medical practice. The report concludes with a discussion of areas and issues that need to be addressed in order to increase the number of youth accessing services, as well as suggestions for other agencies and clinics trying to establish health services for Native youth.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Barriers, Cultural factors, Culturally competent services, Ethnic groups, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Service integration, Youth

Families USA. 2014. Network adequacy and health equity: Improving health insurance provider networks for communities of color. Washington, DC: Families USA, 19 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes the barriers that people of color face disproportionately in gaining access to necessary health care, components of an adequate health care provider network, and policies to help achieve such networks in private insurance plans. Topics include health disparities; geographic distribution, numbers, and types of health care providers; transportation, language, and culturally-competent care; hours and timeliness of care; and consumer rights under the Affordable Care Act including access to community essential providers. The brief provides examples from states and information on advocating for provider network standards to protect diverse communities.

Contact: Families USA, 1225 New York Avenue, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 628-3030 Fax: (202) 347-2417 E-mail: info@familiesusa.org Web Site: http://www.familiesusa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Advocacy, Barriers, Consumer protection, Equal opportunities, Ethnic groups, Health insurance, Networking, Patient rights, Policy development, Public health, Quality assurance, State initiatives

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Minority Health and Health Disparities. 2014. Maryland cultural competency technical assistance resource kit: Health literacy, language services, workforce diversity (upd. ed.). Baltimore, MD: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Minority Health and Health Disparities, 24 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to assist health professionals in Maryland improve the cultural competency of their facilities and programs. Contents include contact information for individuals and organizations with expertise in health equity and cultural competency and information about free and fee-based training resources on topics such as cultural competency and cross-cultural communications, health literacy, language services, and limited English proficiency. Resources for clinical and nonclinical staff and information about health disparities research academic centers, and information are included.

Contact: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Minority Health and Health Disparities, 201 West Preston Street, Room 500, Baltimore, MD 21201, Telephone: (410) 767-7117 E-mail: dhmh.healthdisparities@maryland.gov Web Site: http://dhmh.maryland.gov/mhhd/Pages/home.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Consultants, Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Directories, Health literacy, Languages, Maryland, Resources for professionals, Training materials, Work force

U.S. Office of Minority Health, Center for Linguistic and Cultural Competence in Health Care. 2014. Cultural competency program for oral health professionals. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Minority Health, Center for Linguistic and Cultural Competence in Health Care, 1 v.

Annotation: This course is designed to provide oral health professionals and other health professionals with the knowledge and skills they need to promote cultural and linguistic competence in oral health care. The program consists of three modules that address the fundamentals of culturally and linguistically appropriate oral health care, providing culturally and linguistically appropriate oral health care, and culturally and linguistically appropriate communication and messaging.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health, The Tower Building, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2882 Secondary Telephone: (240) 453-2883 Fax: (240) 453-2883 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Clearinghouses, Communication skills, Competency based education, Continuing education, Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Federal initiatives, Health services, Oral health, Standards, Training

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. (2012). Knowing tribal health (primer). Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 4 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about tribal health, including background about different tribes and health- and government-related issues, treaties and laws, and working successfully with tribes and tribal organizations.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska natives, American Indians, Culturally competent services, Legislation, Minority groups, Minority health, Public health

Kouame G. 2011. The coming of the blessing: Prenatal education, training and resources. [White Plains, NY]: March of Dimes,

Annotation: This web site hosts an initiative for American Indian and Alaska Native families providing prenatal education, training and resources to encourage women to include traditional beliefs, lessons from their ancestors, and their partners in their circle of support during pregnancy. Site navigation points include awards and recognition, storytelling, publications, resources, a prematurity prevention resource center, and information on CenteringPregnancy contacts from tribal partners.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Consumer education materials, Cultural beliefs, Family support services, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Social support

Lynch EW, Hanson MJ, eds. 2011. Developing cross-cultural competence: A guide for working with children and their families. (4th ed.). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Company, 546 pp.

Annotation: This book presents information about the range of cultures within the United States, and advice about developing cultural competence in order to work with families of differing origins. The book gives the cultural perspectives of families of Anglo-European, Native American, African American, Latino, Asian, Philipino, Hawaiian, Samoan, Middle Eastern, and South Asian origin. For each culture, the book lists bibliographies, beliefs, values, practices, cultural courtesies, and significant cultural events. The intended audience is health or social services professionals working with children with special health needs. Concluding sections include suggested readings and resources, and author and subject indexes.

Contact: Brookes Publishing, P.O. Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21285-0624, Telephone: (800) 638-3775 Secondary Telephone: (410) 337-9580 Fax: (410) 337-8539 E-mail: custserv@brookespublishing.com Web Site: http://www.brookespublishing.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-55766-744-6.

Keywords: American Indians, Asian Americans, Blacks, Children with special health care needs, Cultural competence, Ethnic groups, Hispanic Americans, Pacific Americans

Early Head Start National Resource Center. [2010]. Revisiting and updating the multicultural principles for Head Start programs serving children ages birth to five: Addressing culture and home language in Head Start programs and services. [Washington, DC]: Early Head Start National Resource Center, 80 pp.

Annotation: This document provides multicultural principles for Head Start programs and reviews research on multicultural principles. Contents are presented as 10 principles: individuals and culture, culturally relevant Head Start programming, learning about cultures of different groups and discarding stereotypes, cultural relevance and curriculum choices/adaptation, identity and functioning in society, English- and non-English-language learning, staff who reflect and are responsive to communities and families served, multicultural programming for children that respects differences, examining and challenging institutional and personal biases, and incorporating cultural and diverse programs in all systems and services.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Cultural beliefs, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Head Start, Oral health, Program development

Goode T, Trivedi P, Jones W. 2010. Cultural and linguistic competence assessment for disability organizations. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 1 v.

Annotation: This self-assessment instrument and companion usage guide are intended to help organizations that focus on disabilities evaluate their own cultural and linguistic competence. The assessment tool is designed to help disability organizations (1) plan for and incorporate culturally and linguistically competent values, policies, structures, and practices in all aspects of their work; (2) enhance the quality of services, supports, and advocacy provided to diverse and underserved communities; (3) effect change in education, training, technical assistance, research, and public policy; and (4) advance cultural and linguistic competence as an essential approach to address racial and ethnic disparities and promote equity for people who experience disabilities and their families. Definitions and key concepts are included, along with guidelines for completing the assessment questionnaire. The companion usage guide describes the four-phase approach to self-assessment encouraged by the National Center for Cultural Competence and explains how it can be adapted to meet the specific needs of an organization.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Disabilities, Organizations, Self evaluation

Goode TD. 2010. A guide for using the Cultural and Linguistic Competence Family Organization Assessment instrument. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 28 pp.

Annotation: This guide explains how to use the Cultural and Linguistic Competence Family Organization Assessment (CLCFOA) Instrument developed by the National Center for Cultural Competence to address the unique functions of family organizations concerned with children and youth with mental, emotional, and behavioral health disorders, special health care needs, and disabilities. The guide provides a detailed description of the CLCFOA; describes a four-phase approach to self assessment; and offers practical steps to help make the self assessment process work for family organizations. It explains how to score the CLCFOA, how to analyze and report data from it, and how to develop an implement an action plan. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with developmental disabilities, Assessment, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Culturally competent services, Family centered services, Self evaluation

Goode TD. 2010. A guide for using the cultural and linguistic competence sssessment for disability organizations. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 29 pp.

Annotation: This self-assessment and companion user's guide are designed to help organizations that focus on disabilities (1) plan for and incorporate culturally and linguistically competent values, policies, structures, and practices in all aspects of their work; (2) enhance the quality of services, supports, and advocacy provided to diverse and underserved communities; (3) effect change in education, training, technical assistance, research, and public policy; and (4) advance cultural and linguistic competence as an essential approach to address racial and ethnic disparities and promote equity for people who experience disabilities. The guide includes a description of the four-phase approach to self assessment supported by the National Center for Cultural Competency; and steps to help make the self-assessment process work for your organization. Appendices include definitions and key concepts along with suggested interview questions should you choose to seek augmented data.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Disabilities, Organizations, Self evaluation

Levitz B, Allard I, Edwards K. 2010. Guide to developing training curriculum on families, disability, and culture for MCH trainees and professionals. Valhalla, NY: Westchester Institute for Human Development and New York Medical College, (MCH leadership competencies (v.3))

Annotation: This web-based guide for curriculum development focuses on family-centered and family-directed practices and cultural competency for maternal and child health (MCH) professionals and trainees. The guide supports the development and implementation of an integrated curriculum to strengthen knowledge, skills, and important competencies. Resources for MCH training program faculty, training coordinators, and curriculum developers are included.

Contact: Westchester Institute for Human Development, Cedarwood Hall, Valhalla, NY 10595, Telephone: (914) 193-8150 E-mail: wihd@wihd.org Web Site: https://www.wihd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Curriculum development, MCH training, MCH training programs, Families, Resource materials

Shaefer J. 2010. When an infant dies: Cross cultural expressions of grief and loss IV. Washington, DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; [Lansing, MI]: Association of SIDS and Infant Mortality Programs, 16 pp. (Bulletin [no. 4])

Annotation: This bulletin explores the cultural traditions of African Americans, Iranians, Somalis, and hard of hearing families grieving the loss of an infant. It summarizes a panel presentation from the National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Program’s Fifth National Conference, held in August 2007 in Alexandria, VA. It includes a brief summary of studies on grief along with insights on the grief responses and customs of families from a variety of cultures. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Fetal-Infant Mortality Review Program, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street, S.W.***DEFUNCT***, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (202) 863-2587 E-mail: nfimr@acog.org Web Site: http://www.nfimr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bereavement, Blacks, Cultural competence, Cultural factors, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Ethnic groups, Grief, Muslims

National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative. [2009]. Cultural and linguistic competence (CLC) [toolkit]. Newton, MA: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention,

Annotation: This toolkit provides information about the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative. The Safe Schools/Healthy Communities projects form collaborative efforts that involve educators, mental health professionals, juvenile justice professionals, and law enforcement agencies in creating safe learning environments that promote healthy child and adolescent development and prevent child and adolescent violence and drug use. The toolkit provides strategies for integrating cultural and linguistic competence into the initiative. The toolkit includes resources, publications, events and opportunities, a grantee locator, briefs, e-newsletters, fact sheets, and other tools. A document describing the initiative and a guide for engaging school administrators are also available.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453, Telephone: (877) 217-3595 Fax: (617) 969-5951 E-mail: info@promoteprevent.org Web Site: http://www.promoteprevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent development, Child development, Collaboration, Communities, Communities, Costs, Cultural competence, Families, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Initiatives, Initiatives, Low income groups, Mental health, Public health, Resource materials, Risk factors, Safety, Schools, Schools, Violence prevention

Bronheim S, Dunne C, Goode T. 2009. Rationale for cultural and linguistic competence in Maternal and Child Health Bureau-funded training programs. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 4 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines areas of opportunity relating to preparing new culturally and linguistically competent MCH leaders and increasing diversity among future MCH leaders in the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) funded training programs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence , Ethnic groups, Federal programs, Limited English speakers

Goode TD. 2009. Promoting cultural diversity and cultural competency: Self-assessment checklist for personnel providing services and supports to children with disabilities and special health needs and their families [rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, 4 pp.

Annotation: This self-assessment checklist, which is geared for personnel providing services and supports to children with disabilities and special health care needs and their families, is designed to heighten the awareness and sensitivity of personnel to the importance of cultural diversity and cultural competence in human service settings. The checklist provides concrete examples of the kinds of values and practices that foster such an environment. The checklist includes questions in the following categories: (1) physical environment, materials, and resources; (2) communication styles; and (3) values and attitudes. Information about how to use the checklist is also provided.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Disabilities, Families, Guidelines, Health personnel, Human services, Questionnaires

Goode TD. 2009. Promoting cultural diversity and cultural competency: Self-assessment checklist for personnel providing behavioral health services and supports to children, youth, and their families [rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, 4 pp.

Annotation: This self-assessment checklist, which is geared for personnel providing services and supports to children with disabilities and special health care needs and their families, is designed to heighten the awareness and sensitivity of personnel to the importance of cultural diversity and cultural competence in human service settings. The checklist provides concrete examples of the kinds of values and practices that foster such an environment. The checklist includes questions in the following categories: (1) physical environment, materials, and resources; (2) communication styles; and (3) values and attitudes. Information about how to use the checklist is also provided.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Disabilities, Families, Guidelines, Health personnel, Human services, Questionnaires

Goode TD. 2009. Promoting cultural diversity and cultural competency: Self-assessment checklist for personnel providing services and supports in early intervention and early childhood settings [rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, 7 pp.

Annotation: This self-assessment checklist, which is geared for personnel providing services and supports in early intervention and early childhood settings, is designed to heighten the awareness and sensitivity of personnel to the importance of cultural diversity and linguistic competency. The checklist includes questions in the following categories: (1) physical environment, materials, and resources; (2) communication styles; and (3) values and attitudes. Information about how to use the checklist is also provided.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Children with special health care needs, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Disabilities, Early intervention, Families, Guidelines, Health personnel, Human services, Questionnaires, Young children

Goode TD. 2009. Promoting cultural diversity and cultural competency: Self-assessment checklist for personnel providing services and supports to individuals and families affected by sudden and unexpected infant death (SUID) [rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, 4 pp.

Annotation: This checklist is intended to heighten awareness and sensitivity of personnel to the importance of cultural diversity and cultural competence in settings that serve individuals and families experiencing sudden and unexpected infant death. Questions focus on areas including physical environment, materials and resources; communications styles; and values and attitudes.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Infant death, Infant mortality, SIDS, Self evaluation

Baran N, Litton LJ. 2008. Helping battered women and their children: A guide for domestic violence advocates on the co-occurence of domestic violence and child maltreatment. Washington, DC: Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women, 76 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is a companion to the Manual for Domestic Violence Advocates: Negotiating Programs Administered Through the Missouri Department of Social Services, is geared toward domestic violence advocates. The document provides information about (1) complexities of cases in which domestic violence and child maltreatment are present, (2) resources needed to respond effectively to child maltreatment, (3) fostering cross-system collaboration to increase the safety of abused mothers and their children, (4) guidelines on how to respond when either the adult victim or the batterer is responsible for child abuse or neglect, and (5) finding ways to help battered mothers who maltreat their children. Topics covered include co-occurence of domestic violence and child maltreatment; confidentiality, information sharing, and mandatory reporting; tools, resources, and strategies; and cultural competence, bias, and diversity.

Contact: National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, University of Nevada, P.O. Box 8970, Reno, NV 89507, Telephone: (775) 784-6012 Fax: (775) 784-6628 E-mail: staff@ncjfcj.org Web Site: http://www.ncjfcj.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child abuse, Collaboration, Confidentiality, Cultural competence, Domestic violence, Maltreated children, Missouri, Mothers, Safety

Martinez K, Van Buren E. 2008. Cultural and linguistic competence: Implementation guide. Washington, DC: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, 124 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides community examples, best practices, and information on specific tools and resources that can assist systems of care communities, partnering agencies, and organizations to build and promote cultural and linguistic competency (CLC). It is organized around six domains: governance and organization infrastructure, services and supports, planning and continuous quality improvements, collaboration, communication, and workforce development. Each domain contains descriptions of specific implementation strategies, examples of best practices in the field, internet links to important resources that can help leaders and practitioners design culturally and linguistically competent practices and policies, and performance indicators and measures that can be used to assess the outcomes of approaches used to actualize CLC.

Contact: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 403-6827 Fax: (202) 403-5007 E-mail: tapartnership@air.org Web Site: http://www.tapartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Community programs, Cultural competence, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Language barriers, Model programs, Resources for professionals, Sociocultural factors

Perkins J,Youdelman M. 2008. Summary of state law requirements addressing language needs in health care. Washington, DC: National Health Law Program, 136 pp.

Annotation: This document comprises a chart offering citations to, and a short description of, each state's laws regarding services to limited English proficiency persons in health care settings. The chart updates and replaces the list of state laws first published by the National Health Law Program as part of its language access manual, Ensuring Linguistic Access in Health Care Settings: Legal Rights and Responsibilities. Highlights of activities related to addressing language access in health care settings over the last two years are presented in an introduction to the chart.

Contact: National Health Law Program, 1441 I Street, N.W., Suite 1105, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 289-7724 E-mail: nhelp@healthlaw.org Web Site: http://www.healthlaw.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Health care, Legal responsibility, Limited English speakers, Patient rights, State legislation

Goode T, Jones W. 2007. A guide for advancing family-centered and culturally and linguistically competent care. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 23 pp.

Annotation: This guide is the outcome from a meeting convened by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau to explore ways in which family-centered care and cultural and linguistic competence could be integrated in a more effective manner to support and sustain a community-based system of services that are comprehensive, coordinated, and accessible and that provide the highest quality of care. Contents include definitions, guiding values and principles, rationale for care that is family-centered and culturally and linguistically competent, the purpose of the guide, areas of focus, suggested steps for using this guide, references, and acknowledgements. Areas of focus include research and dissemination; training, education, and professional development; information exchange and social marketing; innovative practices; and accountability and outcomes. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Family centered care, Health services delivery, Resources for professionals

Goode TD, Jones W, Dunne C, Bronheim S. 2007. And the journey continues... Achieving cultural and linguistic competence in systems serving children and youth with special health care needs and their families. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 56 pp.

Annotation: This monograph offers insights and lessons learned by the National Center for Cultural Competence (NCCC) from State Title V Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN) programs in implementing culturally and linguistically competent policies, structures, and practices. Topics include an overview of the history of CSHCN Division of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, "postcards" from eight states' experiences, lessons of the NCCC in leadership, shared ownership,"isms" confronting the undercurrents, keeping it real, and weaving cultural competence into the fabric of the organization. Examples are given from these states: Alaska, Connecticut, Florida, Guam, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin. Lists of references and state contacts conclude the monograph.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website after registration.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Cultural competence, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Maternal and child health services, National Center on Cultural Competence, Resources for professionals, State initiatives, Title V programs

Harris ML, Dillon C, Nelson R. 2007. Healthy schools, healthy communities, and youth obesity: Lessons learned from the national forums and regional dialogues of the NACo Center for Sustainable Communities. Washington, DC: Center for Sustainable Communities, National Association of Counties, 19 pp.

Annotation: This publication describes insights from three 2006 dialogues called to discuss the challenges and opportunities of using school programs to improve youth health and fitness and contains practical, replicable information for community leaders. Contents include a brief summary of how the dialogues were hosted and facilitated, the challenges and opportunities faced in improving youth health in collaboration with schools, the strategies and actions implemented, and a description of two related forums conducted with African American and Latino county officials on the impacts of obesity of the youth in their communities and their specific community and cultural challenges. Appendices include contact information and a questionnaire for participants in the dialogues.

Contact: National Association of Counties, 25 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 393-6226 Web Site: http://www.naco.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Cultural factors, Exercise, Health promotion, Hispanic Americans, Obesity, Physical education, Physical fitness, Prevention programs, School age children, School health education, Youth

Shaefer J. 2007. When an infant dies: Cross cultural expressions of grief and loss III. Washington, DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; [Lansing, MI]: Association of SIDS and Infant Mortality Programs, 20 pp. (Bulletin [no. 3])

Annotation: This bulletin summarizes a panel presentation from the National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Program's Fifth National Conference, held August 12-14, 2004 in Washington, DC. It explores the cultural traditions of Hmong, African American, and Jewish families grieving the loss of a pregnancy or infant. It is the third in a series focused on cross-cultural grief and loss and provides an updated review of the literature. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Fetal-Infant Mortality Review Program, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street, S.W.***DEFUNCT***, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (202) 863-2587 E-mail: nfimr@acog.org Web Site: http://www.nfimr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bereavement, Blacks, Child death, Cultural factors, Death attitudes, Ethnic factors, Ethnic groups, Fetal death, Grief, Infant death, Neonatal death, Perinatal bereavement, Pregnancy loss, Religion

Shaefer J, Bronheim S. 2007. Community engagement brings credibility to risk reduction. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, SIDS/Other Infant Death Project, 6 pp. (Promising practices for cultural and linguistic competence in addressing sudden infant death syndrome and other infant death)

Annotation: This paper provides information on how the Closing the Gap program developed a culturally competent risk-reduction program to address the high incidence of SIDS among African-American infants in Chicago, compared with white infants. The paper describes the program that was created to reduce preterm labor, premature births, and infant mortality; discusses the actions taken as a result of this program; and explains why it works. Information on the National Center for Cultural Competence is included.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Community programs, Cultural competence, Illinois, Infant mortality, Model programs, Prematurity, Preterm birth, Prevention, SIDS

Fleming M, Towey K. [2006]. Delivering culturally effective health care to adolescents. Chicago, IL: American Medical Association, 106 pp.

Annotation: This workbook, which is geared toward health professionals, is designed to provide readers with practical information to enhance communication with adolescents by offering suggestions for delivering individualized health care that is based on respect for and sensitivity to the multiple factors that define culture. Chapters include demographic characteristics of adolescents, a discussion of culture and health care, a review of culture and communication, an assessment for clinicians, and a consideration of special issues. Each chapter addresses a central theme or single issue that is anchored by specific objectives and features exercises to help readers gain proficiency. The chapters included references, charts, and graphs to illustrate demographic information, and recommendations for communicating with adolescents and their families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Medical Association, 515 North State Street, Chicago, IL 60610, Telephone: (800) 621-8335 Fax: Web Site: http://www.ama-assn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Communication, Culturally competent care, Families, Manuals

Industry Collaboration Effort, Cultural and Linguistic Workgroup. [2006]. Better communication, better care: Provider tools to care for diverse populations. Whittier, CA: Industry Collaboration Effort, 56 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit provides a set of materials for healthcare professionals to use in providing care to a diverse patient population. Materials include tip sheets, interview guides, flash cards and signs in multiple languages, self assessment forms, civil rights legislation and a list of standards for culturally and linguistically appropriate services . Topics include interaction with a diverse patient base, communication across language barriers, understanding patients from various cultural backgrounds, and references and resources.

Contact: Industry Collaboration Effort, P.O. Box 6270, Whittier, CA 92658, Fax: (775) 345-7564 E-mail: admin@iceforhealth.org Web Site: http://www.iceforhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Health care delivery, Language barriers, Physician patient relations

America's Health Insurance Plans. 2006. Tools to address disparities in health: Communications resources to close the gap--A compendium of resources for health insurance plans, physicians, and health care organizations. Washington, DC: America's Health Insurance Plans, 45 pp.

Annotation: This compendium provides culturally relevant resources and actions that health insurance plans, physicians and clinicians, and health care organizations can integrate into organization-wide initiatives and incorporate in everyday communications with health care consumers. Topics include types of health information requested by consumers; consumer views and attitudes on the collection of data by race, ethnicity, and primary language by health insurance plans, hospitals, and others; a review of research on improving access and cross-cultural communications; recommendations to improve consumer knowledge and awareness of health disparities and culturally and linguistically appropriate health care messages and services. The compendium includes lists of resources, tools, and Web sites designed for consumers and health care professionals to improve health communications, and increase the rates of preventive screenings and medication adherence.

Contact: America's Health Insurance Plans, 601 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., South Building, Suite 500, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 778-3200 Fax: (202) 331-7487 E-mail: ahip@ahip.org Web Site: http://www.aahp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communications, Cultural diversity, Culturally competent services, Health care delivery, Oral health, Physician patient relations

Beamon CJ, Devisetty V, Hill JMF, Huang W, Shumate JA. 2006. A guide to incorporating cultural competency into health professionals' education and training. [Washington, DC]: National Health Law Program, 28 pp.

Annotation: This guide explores the need for cultural competency education and training for health professionals and provides a checklist for a model cultural competency curriculum for the field of medicine. An overview of federal guidelines and state initiatives is provided, along with examples of various professional organizations, foundations, and medical schools related to the provision of cultural competency training.

Contact: National Health Law Program, 1441 I Street, N.W., Suite 1105, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 289-7724 E-mail: nhelp@healthlaw.org Web Site: http://www.healthlaw.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Culturally competent services, Curricula, Education, Guidelines, Health personnel, State initiatives, Training

Betancourt JR. 2006. Improving quality and achieving equity: The role of cultural competence in reducing racial and ethnic disparities in health care. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 19 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews key principles of quality in health care, evidence of the existence and root causes of racial and ethnic health disparities and recommendations to address them; and discusses strategies by which the quality and cultural competence movements could be linked. It focuses on the Institute of Medicine's six principles for designing a high-quality health care system to identify areas where aspects of cultural competence would be central to achieving high quality. A framework is presented outlining both hypothetical and proven strategies for delivering high-quality, culturally competent care. Endnotes conclude the report.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Health care delivery, Health care systems, Minority groups, Minority health

California Pan-Ethnic Health Network. 2006. Holding health plans accountable: The provision of culturally and linguistically competent services by health plans participating in the Healthy Families program. Oakland, CA: California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, 8 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the Healthy Families Program, which provides health insurance coverage to over 732,000 Californians, and the provision of culturally and linguistically competent services by health plans participating in the program. The report presents background, findings, and a conclusion.

Contact: California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, 1221 Preservation Park Way, Suite 200, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 832-1160 Fax: (510) 832-1175 E-mail: info@cpehn.org Web Site: http://www.cpehn.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Culturally competent services, Families, Health insurance, Langage barriers, Language, Low income groups, State health insurance programs

Goode TD, Dunne C, Bronheim SM. 2006. The evidence base for cultural and linguistic competency in health care. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 46 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews the evidence base for the impact of cultural and linguistic competence in health and mental health care on health outcomes and well-being and the costs and benefits to the system. Topics include the level of evidence for cultural and linguistic competence research, summaries of the research trends, suggests future directions in research, as well as a discussion of system costs and and the business case for cultural and linguistic competence. The appendix includes information on the report methodology, the overall state of the evidence for health outcomes and well-being, and evidence from experimental design studies. Notes conclude the report.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cost effectiveness, Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Health care delivery, Mental health services, Research

Hernandez M, Nesman T, Issacs M, Callejas LM, Mowery D. 2006. Making children's mental health services successful: Examining the research base supporting culturally competent children's mental health services. Tampa, FL: Research and Training Center for Children's Mental Health, University of South Florida, 160 pp.

Annotation: This monograph presents a description and analysis of the research literature related to child and family mental health among African Americans, Asian American/Pacific Islanders, Latinos, and Native Americans. These groups provide a starting point for analyzing the existing literature available to support organizational cultural competence strategies and identify gaps that require further study. Background information for each of these populations is also provided, including population characteristics and community context factors that influence the development, implementation, and operationalization of cultural competence in terms of access, availability, and utilization of mental health services. Appendices provide summaries of strategies for each of the cultural groups. Figures and tables present data throughout the monograph.

Contact: University of South Florida, Research and Training Center for Children's Mental Health, 13301 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33612-3809, Telephone: (813) 974-4661 Fax: (813) 974-6257 E-mail: kutash@fmhi.usf.edu Web Site: http://rtckids.fmhi.usf.edu/ Available from the website. Document Number: Publication no. 240-1.

Keywords: Culturally competent services, Asian Americans, Blacks, Child health, Cultural factors, Cultural sensitivity, Family health, Hispanic Americans, Literature reviews, Mental health services, Minority groups, Pacific Islanders, Service utilization

National Center for Cultural Competence. 2006. A guide for using the Cultural and Linguistic Competence Policy Assessment instrument. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 40 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance on how to use the Cultural and Linguistic Policy Assessment instrument, a tool designed to support the Bureau of Primary Health Care and its funded programs in (1) improving health care access and utilization, (2) enhancing the quality of services within culturally diverse and underserved communities, and (3) promoting cultural and linguistic competence as essential approaches in the elimination of health disparities. The document describes the instrument and provides a checklist for conducting cultural and linguistic competence organizational self-assessment.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Assessment, Cultural competence: Language, Cultural diversity, Language barriers, Minority health, Underserved communities

National Center for Cultural Competence. 2006. Cultural and linguistic competence policy assessment. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 18 pp.

Annotation: This paper describes a policy assessment tool developed to support community health centers on (1) improving health care access and utilization, (2) enhancing the quality of services within culturally diverse and underserved communities, and (3) promoting cultural and linguistic competence as essential as essential approaches in the elimination of health disparities. Contents include definitions; the policy assessment tool with sections on knowledge of diverse communities, organizational philosophy, personal involvement in diverse communities, resources and linkages, human resources, clinical practice, and engagement of diverse communities; and a section for respondent demographic information.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Health services delivery, Needs assessment, Questionnaires, Resources for professionals

American Institutes for Research. 2005. A patient-centered guide to implementing language access services in healthcare organizations. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Minority Health [Resource Center], 243 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides practical suggestions for how health care organizations and providers can implement language access services (LAS). LAS are services designed to ensure effective communication between individuals with limited English proficiency and English speakers. The guide is designed to serve as a resource for organizations such as hospitals, health maintenace organizations, community health centers, clinics, physician's practices, and others. The guide contains four steps and six resource units that provide guidance on implementing LAS. The first two steps involve assessment. The third step focuses on planning, implementation, and evaluation of the various components of LAS. The fourth step provides a detailed discussion of specific methods for monitoring, evaluating, and improving LAS. Each step and resource unit describes two case studies that depict a situation and reactions to the situation from the patient and provider perspectives. Also included in the guide are Web-linked tools, resources, and tips.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health Resource Center, P.O. Box 37337, Washington, DC 20013-7337, Telephone: (800) 444-6472 Secondary Telephone: (301) 251-1432 Fax: (301) 251-2160 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=1&lvlid=3 Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Case studies, Culturally competent services, Evaluation, Language, Language barriers, Limited English speakers, Program planning

Campinha-Bacote J, Claymore-Cuny D, Cora-Bramble D, Gilbert J, Husbands RM, Like RC, Llerena-Quinn R, Lu FG, Soto-Greene ML, Stubblefield-Tave B, Tang G. 2005. Transforming the face of health professions through cultural and linguistic competence education: The role of HRSA Centers of Excellence. Rockville, MD: U.S. Bureau of Health Professions, Division of Health Careers Diversity and Development, 191 pp.

Annotation: This compendium provides practical guidance in the form of strategies, tools, and resources from Health Resources and Services Centers of Excellence (HRSA COE) Programs that are implementing and integrating cultural and linguistic competency content and methods into existing academic programs. Ito also provides guidance for evaluating cultural and linguistic competency efforts. The curriculum is organized into 10 chapters: (1) cultural and linguistic competence and COEs, (2) the guiding principles and goals of cultural and linguistic competence education, (3) strategies for success in implementing cultural and linguistic competence education, (4) creating a framework for cultural and linguistic competence curriculum, (5) curriculum content for cultural and linguistic competence, (6) delivering a cultural and linguistic competence curriculum, (7) assessment and evaluation of a culturally competent COE, (8) dissemination, (9) summary and next steps, and (10) resources. The compendium also includes three appendices: a tool box, a glossary, and a report that describes cultural and linguistic competence of HRSA COE grantees.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Culturally competent services, Curricula, Curriculum development, Education, Language barriers

Dower C. 2005. Bilingual proficiency among California's health care professionals. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, Center for the Health Professions, California Workforce Initiative, 8 pp.

Annotation: This report presents information about bilingual proficiency among California's health professionals. The importance for health professionals of being able to communicate effectively with individuals with low English proficiency is discussed. Also discussed is assessing language proficiency among health professionals, the next generation of more-comprehensive language testing that includes areas such as cultural issues and knowledge of health care terminology, certifying health professionals in a second language, setting up a certification program, and policy options. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. References are included.

Contact: University of California, San Francisco, Healthforce Center for Research and Leadership Development, 3333 California Street, Suite 410, San Francisco, CA 94143, Telephone: (415) 476-8181 E-mail: healthforcecenter@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://healthforce.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Communication, Culturally competent services, Health personnel, Language, Language barriers, Limited English speakers, Public policy

National Center for Cultural Competence. 2005. Infusing cultural and linguistic competence into health promotion training. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 1 DVD (90 min.).

Annotation: This 90-minute training DVD is designed to help experienced health promotion trainers ensure that their approaches with diverse populations address culture and language in an effective, appropriate, and respectful manner. The DVD addresses (1) rationale for cultural and linguistic competence, (2) frameworks for achieving cultural and linguistic competence, (3) values, principles, and practices of culturally and linguistically competent health promotion training, (4) how the Health Belief Model can be used to infuse cultural and linguistic competence into training, (5) principles and models for community engagement, and (6) issues in the content and logistics of trainings. The DVD can be used alone or in conjunction with a set of training activities designed to enhance the content, which are available from the National Center for Cultural Competence Web site. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National SUID/SIDS Resource Center , Georgetown University, 2115 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W., Suite 601***DEFUNCT***, Washington, DC 20007-2292, Telephone: (866) 866-7437 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-7466 E-mail: info@sidscenter.org Web Site: http://www.sidscenter.org Single copies available at no charge.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, DVDs, Health promotion, Language, Language barriers, Linguistic competence, Training materials

National Council on Interpreting in Health Care. 2005. National standards of practice for interpreters in health care. Santa Rosa, CA: National Council on Interpreting in Health Care, 13 pp.

Annotation: These standards of practice are intended to be used as a reference by interpreters anad those who work with, train, and employ interpreters. The standards are intended to guide the practice of all interpreters and to acquaint non-interpreters with the standards recognized withing the interpreting profession. The standards are divided into the following categories: (1) accuracy, (2) confidentiality, (3) impartiality, (4) respect, (5) cultural awareness, (6) role boundaries, (7) professionalism, (8) professional development, and (9) advocacy. A glossary is included.

Contact: National Council on Interpreting in Health Care, 5614 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., #119, Washington, DC 20015-2601, Telephone: (202) 505-1537 Fax: (267) 217-9674 E-mail: info@ncihc.org Web Site: http://www.ncihc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Guidelines, Language barriers, Standards, Training, Translations

Nimer M. 2005. A health care providers guide to Islamic religious practices. Washington, DC: Council on American-Islamic Relations, 19 pp. (CAIR guides to Islamic religious practices)

Annotation: This guide provides information to assist health professionals in formulating and implementing policies and procedures aimed at the delivery of more culturally competent care for Muslims. It also serves as a guide for the accommodation of religiously mandated practices of Muslim clients. Topics include Muslim view of illness and treatment, U.S. legal protections of religious freedom, daily prayer, washing, prayer space, Friday congregational prayer, fasting, Muslim holidays, dietary requirements, clothing, touching, birth and circumcision, death, on call chaplains, autopsy, assisted suicide and euthanasia, and abortion and stillborns. Information on medical procedures and a glossary of Muslim terms are also included.

Contact: Council on American-Islamic Relations, 453 New Jersey Avenue, S.E., Washington, DC 20003, Telephone: (202) 488-8787 Fax: (202) 488-0833 Web Site: http://www.cair.com/Home.aspx $2.00 plus postage and handling; also available from the website.

Keywords: Culturally competent services, Health attitudes, Health behavior, Health care delivery, Muslims, Religion

Roat CE. 2005. Addressing language access issues in your practice: A toolkit for physicians and their staff members. San Francisco, CA: California Academy of Family Physicians, 39 pp.

Annotation: This tool kit for physicians and other health professionals in California provides guidance on how to re-design an office practice to provide the best possible care to individuals who speak limited English. Topics covered include identifying patients' language preferences, identifying resources to address language access, and using the right mix of services. The tool kit includes five appendices: (1) making the case: the practical and the policy of language access, (2) sample policy and procedure manual, (3) sample job description, (4) sample interpreter service waiver, and (5) other resources.

Contact: California Academy of Family Physicians, 1520 Pacific Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94109, Telephone: (415) 345-8667 Fax: (415) 345-8668 E-mail: cafp@familydocs.org Web Site: http://www.familydocs.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, California, Communication, Culturally competent services, Health personnel, Language barriers, Limited English proficiency, Physicians

Sareen H, Vicensio D, Russ S, Halfon N. 2005. The role of state early childhood comprehensive systems in promoting cultural competence and effective cross-cultural communication. Los Angeles, CA: National Center for Infant and Early Childhood Health Policy, 28 pp. (Building state early childhood comprehensive systems; no. 8)

Annotation: This report explores what it means for services to be culturally competent and how State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (SECCS) grantees can work toward enhanced levels of competence to improve the quality of services not just for children who are members of ethnic minority groups, but for all of America's children. Topics include a definition of culture, cultural competence and proficiency; the relevance of culture to SECCS initiative planning with examples from childrearing goals, parent attitudes and practices, and developmental milestones. Also discussed are the effect of early childhood experiences on the life course, persistent racial and ethnic disparities in health and education, cultural awareness and early childhood systems, and implications of cultural competence for early childhood policy. References conclude the report. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Childrearing, Cultural beliefs, Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Early childhood development, Ethnic factors, Parent child relations, Parenting, Program planning, Racial factors, Service delivery systems, Young children

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Services for Children With Special Health Care Needs. 2005. Definition of family-centered care. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Services for Children With Special Health Care Needs, 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides a definition of family-centered care, the goal of which is to ensure the health and well-being of children and their families through a respectful family-professional partnership. The fact sheet also includes a list of principles of family-centered care.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Services for Children with Special Health Needs, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Secondary Telephone: (301) 945-9842 Web Site: http://mchb.hrsa.gov/maternal-child-health-topics/children-and-youth-special-health-needs Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Family centered care, Family centered services, Health care

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Services for Children With Special Health Care Needs. 2005. The role of cultural competence in family-centered care. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Services for Children With Special Health Care Needs, 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses how cultural competence is intrinsically connected to family-centered care, the goal of which is to ensure the health and well-being of children and their families through a respectful family-professional partnership. The fact sheet also includes a definition of cultural and linguistic competence and a list of principles of cultural competence.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Services for Children with Special Health Needs, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Secondary Telephone: (301) 945-9842 Web Site: http://mchb.hrsa.gov/maternal-child-health-topics/children-and-youth-special-health-needs Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Families, Family centered care, Family centered services, Health care, Linguistic competence

Youdelman M, Perkins J. 2005. Providing language services in small health care provider settings: Examples from the field. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund; Washington, DC: National Health Law Program, 78 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study conducted to assess current innovations in providing language services in small health care provider settings and identifies promising practices that are replicable by other small providers (e.g., recruiting bilingual staff for dual roles; conducting ongoing cultural and language competency training for interpreter staff; using community resources such as hospitals, managed care organizations, students, and volunteers; and capitalizing on underutilized resources). An eight-step plan to help providers develop a strategy to meet the needs of limited English proficiency clients and the community is included. Three appendices include a summary of surveyed models for providing language assistance services in small health care provider settings, a suggested plan of implementing language services, and the project methodology.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Culturally competent services, Health professionals, Limited English speakers, Model programs, Training, Translations

Bronheim S. [2004]. Cultural competence: It all starts at the front desk. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 7 pp.

Annotation: This pamphlet discusses the importance of cultural competence at the front desk. Negative consequences of front desk staff's failure to use culturally and linguistically competent practices are listed. Examples of individuals who have encountered culturally or linguistically inappropriate practices at the front desk, and how these experiences affected them, are included. The pamphlet also includes suggested guidelines that agencies, practices, clinics, and hospitals can follow to address the cultural and linguistic competence of the front desk.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Agencies, Clinics, Cultural beliefs, Cultural factors, Culturally competent services, Hospitals, Language barriers, Linguistic competence

U.S. Office of Minority Health, Center for Linguistic and Cultural Competence in Health Care. 2004–. Think cultural health. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Minority Health, Center for Linguistic and Cultural Competence in Health Care, 3 courses.

Annotation: These resources and tools designed for health professionals are intended to promote cultural and linguistic competence in health care. The goal is to advance health equity at every point of contact through the development and promotion of culturally and linguistically appropriate services. Contents include free and accredited continuing education programs as well as tools to help health professionals and organizations provide respectful, understandable, and effective services. Information on standards in specific areas, such as oral health and state legislative initiatives, is provided. A clearinghouse of materials is provided; searches can be performed using assigned keywords.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health, The Tower Building, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2882 Secondary Telephone: (240) 453-2883 Fax: (240) 453-2883 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Clearinghouses, Communication skills, Competency based education, Continuing education, Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Federal initiatives, Health services, Oral health, Standards, Training

Beach MC, Cooper LA, Robinson KA. 2004. Strategies for improving minority healthcare quality: Summary. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 8 pp. (Evidence report/technology assessment; no. 90)

Annotation: This document summarizes a report whose purpose was to systematically review the evidence to determine the effectiveness of interventions designed to improve the quality of health care and/or to reduce disparities for ethnic minorities. The report focused on evaluations of interventions aimed at health professionals or organizations, as recent work suggests that that these factors contribute substantially to the inequities. The authors examined broadly any type of strategy aimed at improving the quality of care in an ethnic minority population of patients and then looked more specifically at strategies designed to improve the cultural competence of health professionals or organizations. The report includes a list of references.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 04-E008-1.

Keywords: Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Health agencies, Health care delivery, Health personnel, Intervention, Minority groups

Dunne C, Goode T. 2004. Using a book club to confront attitudinal barriers and other "isms". Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 7 pp. (Seeds of change: Promising practices for enhancing cultural & linguistic competence at the individual and institutional levels)

Annotation: This pamphlet discusses how to use a book club to learn about bias, discrimination, stereotyping, and prejudice. It explains how books can be catalysts for change, how to make a book club a reality, the impact of such a book club, and how a book club can grow into something larger. The pamphlet also includes start-up strategies, sample book club selections, and contact information. The pamphlet highlights the experiences of the Family Support Organization of Burlington County, NJ, a group of parents or guardians of children with emotional, behavioral, or mental health challenges.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Cultural competence, Discrimination, Groups, Model programs, Racism, Reading, Social bias

Fortier JP, Bishop D, Brach C, ed. 2004. Setting the agenda for research on cultural competence in health care. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Minority Health, 219 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the impact of cultural competence interventions on the delivery of health care and health outcomes and investigates the opportunities and barriers that affect how further research in this area might be conducted. The report is divided into three parts. Part 1 presents and introduction and key findings. Part 2 discusses culturally competent research agendas. Part 3 discusses methodological and practical considerations related to conducting research on cultural competence. The report includes four appendices: (1) key words used in literature review, (2) literature reviews and matrices, (3) select research advisory committee meeting materials, and (4) abstracts. References are included, as well.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health Resource Center, P.O. Box 37337, Washington, DC 20013-7337, Telephone: (800) 444-6472 Secondary Telephone: (301) 251-1432 Fax: (301) 251-2160 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=1&lvlid=3 Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Culturally competent services, Health care delivery, Research

Hepburn KS. 2004. Building culturally and linguistically competent services to support young children, their families, and school readiness. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 134 pp.

Annotation: This tool kit provides guidance, tools, and resources that to assist communities in building culturally and linguistically competent services, supports, programs, and practices related to young children and their families to promote early childhood development and school readiness. It includes definitions for cultural and linguistic competence, the importance for communities, and provides information on diversity and the cultural context of the family and community, understanding the impact of culture on child development, planning and implementing services, implications for early childhood services and school readiness, and strategies for preparing personnel and implementing services and supports. The kit is meant to support a holistic approach and encourage cultural and linguistic competence across all systems that serve young children and their families in the health, mental health, early intervention, and other service systems. A bibliography concludes the tool kit.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Cultural competence, Early childhood development, Early intervention services, Family support services, Language barriers, Linguistic competence, Mental health services, Preschool children, Program development, School readiness, Service delivery, Young children

Medina AM, Vasquez JF. 2004. Developing linguistically and culturally responsive materials for Latina survivors of domestic violence. (2nd ed.). New York, NY: National Latino Alliance for the Elimination of Domestic Violence, 15 pp.

Annotation: This paper summarizes efforts to understand and help develop responses to the particular challenges and barriers faced by Spanish-speaking Latina survivors of domestic violence and by organizations that seek to provide prevention and intervention services for them and their families. It describes the challenges and barriers; summarizes literature reviews, surveys, and focus groups; and provides preliminary guidelines for the development of Spanish-language materials that respond to the expressed needs of Latina survivors and service providers. The paper includes three appendices: (1) additional means used to document the need for materials and services, (2) reviewed cultural competency materials, and (3) partial listing of Spanish-language resources. Future plans and endnotes are also included.

Contact: National Latino Alliance for the Elimination of Domestic Violence, P.O. Box 2787, Albuquerque, NM 87532, Telephone: (505) 753-3334 Fax: (505) 753-3337 Web Site: http://www.dvalianza.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Culturally competent services, Domestic violence, Guidelines, Hispanic Americans, Language barriers, Literature reviews, Manuals, Spanish language materials, Survivors, Women

Mutha S, Allen C. 2004. Cultural competency for California public health staff: Train-the-trainer State Partnership Project. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, Center for Health Professions, 24 pp.

Annotation: This final report provides a summary of the Cultural Competency for California Public Health Staff: Train the Trainer State Partnership Project, initiated by the California Department of Health Services' Office of Multicultural Health (CDS-OMH) with the goal of developing an outline for a comprehensive curriculum in cultural competency for trainers within CDS and local health departments. The report includes project background, a description of project activities, key findings, key outcomes. conclusions, and recommendations for next steps. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. The report includes one appendix: a framework for teaching cultural competency: a curriculum for trainers of California public health staff.

Contact: University of California, San Francisco, Healthforce Center for Research and Leadership Development, 3333 California Street, Suite 410, San Francisco, CA 94143, Telephone: (415) 476-8181 E-mail: healthforcecenter@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://healthforce.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Cultural competence, Cultural factors, Curricula, Public health education, State projects, Trainers, Training

National Center for Cultural Competence. 2004. Bridging the cultural divide in health care settings: The essential role of the cultural broker programs. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 29 pp.

Annotation: This guide, which is available in English and Spanish, is designed to assist health care organizations in planning, implementing, and sustaining cultural broker programs in ways including the following: (1) introducing the legitimacy of cultural brokering in health care delivery to underserved populations, (2) promoting cultural brokering as an essential approach to increase access to care and eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in health, (3) defining the values, characteristics, areas of awareness, knowledge, and skills required of a broker, and (4) providing guidance on establishing and sustaining a cultural broker program for health care settings that is tailored to the needs and preferences of the communities served. Cultural brokering is defined as bridging, linking, or mediating between groups or persons of different cultural backgrounds to effect change. The guide is intended to serve as a resource to organizations and agencies that are interested in partnering with health care organizations to enhance the health and well-being of communities. The guide includes three appendices: impact of the cultural broker program, mission of the National Center for Cultural Competence, and cultural broker contracts. The guide concludes with references and additional resources.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Communities, Cultural competence, Cultural factors, Health care delivery, Programs, Racial factors, Spanish language materials, Underserved populations

Shah MA, ed. 2004. Transcultural aspects of perinatal health care: A resource guide. [2nd ed.]. Tampa, FL: National Perinatal Association, 313 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide, written for health practitioners, public health departments, academic centers, and libraries, contains information about women's perinatal health care issues of various cultures including African American, Amish (Old Order), Cambodian, Chinese, Cuban, Hmong, Jamaican, Japanese, Jewish, Korean, Mexican, Mormon, Native American, Pakistani, and Seventh-Day Adventist. Each section contains information and history about the culture, health and illness, pregnancy and prenatal care, labor and delivery, postpartum and newborn care, family planning, death and burial rites, and perinatal health care issues highlighted for each of these topics, and references. Charts offered in the preface provide statistical data on infant mortality and recommended standards. The guide concludes with an index.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-58110-097-3.

Keywords: Childbirth, Cultural diversity, Cultural factors, Ethnic factors, Family planning, Infant death, Labor, Perinatal care, Perinatal health, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Religion

Summit Health Institute for Research and Education with Out of Many One, Campaign for the Elimination of Racial and Ethnic Disparities. 2004. Building coalitions among communities of color: A multicultural approach. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of Minority Health, 96 pp.

Annotation: This guide is intended as a resource primarily for people of color who are building coalitions in which representatives from communities of color predominate. The guide is directed toward those seeking to address health disparities, access to health care, and other health-related issues. The guide offers suggestions for coalition building, strategic planning, intergroup relations, organizational development, group maintenance, and evaluation. The guide presents 10 strategies and their corresponding steps. The guide includes five appendices: (1) a glossary, (2) sample forms, (3) references and resources, (4) figures and exhibits, and (5) an evaluation form.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health Resource Center, P.O. Box 37337, Washington, DC 20013-7337, Telephone: (800) 444-6472 Secondary Telephone: (301) 251-1432 Fax: (301) 251-2160 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=1&lvlid=3 Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Coalitions, Communities, Cultural factors, Health, Minority groups, Minority health, Organizations, Racial factors, Strategic plans

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.