Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Childhood Nutrition Bibliography

Childhood Nutrition

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 86 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published in the last ten years focused on childhood nutrition policies, studies, and guidelines as well as nutrition education materials for parents and children.

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 86 records.

Association of State Public Health Nutritionists Maternal and Child Health Council. 2014. MCH nutrition success stories. Johnstown, PA: Association of State Public Health Nutritionists, 5 items.

Annotation: This resource focuses on state agency efforts to promote good nutrition in the maternal and child health population. Contents include information about projects to train home visit staff to be lactation consultants in New Hampshire, a shared meals initiative in Oregon, developing and implementing an early care and education nutrition and physical activity strategic plan in Kentucky, increasing nutrition counseling skills in New Hampshire, and supporting systems and environmental change programs in California. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of State Public Health Nutritionists, P.O. Box 1001, Johnstown, PA 15907-1001, Telephone: (814) 255-2829 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (814) 255-6514 Web Site: http://www.asphn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Child care, Child health, Collaboration, Health promotion, Home visiting, Infant health, Maternal health, Nutrition, Organizational change, Program improvement, Public health nutritionists, State MCH programs, Strategic planning, Systems development, Training

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Nutrition in kids and teens: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find care, services, and support and websites about nutrition in kids and teens. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent nutrition, Bibliographies, Child nutrition, Consumer education materials, Electronic publications, Families

National Center on Health. 2014. Cook's corner: Recipes for healthy snacks. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: National Center on Health, 17 pp.

Annotation: This cookbook includes recipes for healthy snacks that Head Start staff and children can make in a Head Start classroom or at home with their families. The cookbook is divided into recipes for dairy, fruit, vegetables, and more. Each recipe includes a list of ingredients, directions, a picture of the prepared recipe, and, where needed, safety tips. The cookbook is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc Available from the website.

Keywords: Cookbooks, Head Start, Nutrition, Oral health, Snacks, Spanish language materials, Young children

U.S. Food and Nutrition Service. 2014. Smart Snacks in School. U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources highlight the Smart Snacks in School nutrition standards. Topics include an overview, regulation and policy, and technical assistance. Contents include a letter from the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture and U.S. Secretary of Education, an infographic, a summary of the standards, issue briefs, a television feature, a presentation, a blog, frequently asked questions, and related resources for schools.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal initiatives, Nutrition, Policy development, Regulations, Resources for professionals, Schools, Standards, Technical assistance

Action for Healthy Kids. 2013. The learning connection: What you need to know to ensure your kids are healthy and ready to learn. Chicago, IL: Action for Healthy Kids, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the root causes of childhood overweight, revealing a strong link between nutrition, physical activity, and academic success. The report brings attention to the costs of poor nutrition and physical inactivity to schools.

Contact: Action for Healthy Kids, 600 W. Van Buren Street, Suite 720, Chicago, IL 60607-3758, Telephone: (800) 416-5136 Fax: (312) 212-0098 E-mail: info@actionforhealthykids.org Web Site: http://www.actionforhealthykids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Costs, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Schools

Basslet EJ, Chriqui JF, Stagg K, Schneider LM, Infusino K, Asada Y. 2013. Controlling junk food and the bottom line: Case studies of schools successfully implementing strong nutrition standards for competitive foods and beverages. Chicago, IL: Illinois Public Health Institute, 127 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights case studies from middle schools and high schools in eight diverse districts across the country that illustrate ideas and strategies to help district and school-level decisionmakers successfully implement stronger nutrition standards for competitive foods. The report presents findings from a study of policies and practices related primarily to food-service accounts.

Contact: Illinois Public Health Institute, 924 West Washington Boulevard, Suite 405, Mailbox 10, Chicago, IL 60607, Telephone: (312) 850-4744 Fax: (312) 850-4040 Web Site: http://iphionline.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Costs, High schools, Managed competition, Middle schools, Nutrition, Policy analysis, School age children, Snacks, Standards, Students

Children's Museum of Manhattan. 2013. Eat play grow: Creative activities for a healthy start. Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health, We Can!, 157 pp.

Annotation: This health education curriculum teaches children ages 2-5 and their parents how to make healthy nutrition and physical activity choices. The curriculum incorporates art-making, storytelling, music, and movement activities into hands-on educational lessons about the importance of making positive choices in nutrition, physical activity, and sleep. Family handouts and a family health journal are also available in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Information Center, P.O. Box 30105, Bethesda, MD 20824-0105, Telephone: (301) 592-8573 Secondary Telephone: (240) 629-3255 Fax: (301) 592-8563 E-mail: NHLBIinfo@nhlbi.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/infoctr/index.htm Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No.13-7818.

Keywords: Behavior change, Curricula, Early childhood development, Families, Health education, Nutrition, Parent education, Physical activity, Sleep, Young children

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. 2013. Media-smart youth. Rockville, MD: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, multiple items.

Annotation: This website describes Media-Smart Youth: Eat, Think, and Be Active!®, an interactive after-school education program for youth ages 11 to 13. The curriculum combines media literacy and youth development principles and practices with up-to-date research findings and federal recommendations about nutrition and physical activity. Topics include empowering young people to be aware, and think critically about, media's role in influencing nutrition and physical activity choices; building skills to make informed decisions in daily life; establishing healthy habits for life; and learning about media and creating products to educate their peers.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Adolescents, After school programs, Consumer education, Curricula, Health promotion, Leadership, Mass media, Media campaigns, National programs, Nutrition, Peer education, Physical activity

Kleinman RE, ed. 2013. Pediatric nutrition handbook. (7th ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 1477 pp.

Annotation: This handbook is intended to serve as a ready reference for practicing clinicians on the requirements and metabolism of specific nutrients, methods of assessing nutrition status, and the nutrition support of healthy infants, children, and adolescents, as well as children with acute and chronic illness. Topics that arise frequently in pediatric practice, such as breastfeeding, the impact of diet on long-term health, the use of fast foods and vegetarian diets, food technology and novel foods or ingredients that may become available to consumers, and food labeling are also covered in individual chapters.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-58110-816-3.

Keywords: Acute diseases, Adolescents, Child health, Child nutrition, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Food, Food labeling, Food preferences, Infant nutrition, Manuals, Nutrients, Nutrition assessment, Nutritional status, Pediatrics, Technology, Vegetarianism

Olson S, Moats S; Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. 2013. Nutrition education in the K-12 curriculum: The role of national standards–Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 101 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the merits and potential uses of a set of national nutrition education curriculum standards and learning objectives for elementary and secondary school children. Contents include a summary of the presentations and discussion from a workshop held on March 11–12, 2013, in Washington, DC, as well as recommendations made by the speakers. Topics include the current opportunity, the context for change, lessons learned from federal programs and state and local experiences, perspectives from educators, teacher preparation and training, and developing and implementing K–12 national nutrition education curriculum standards.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu $35.10 plus shipping and handling; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-28719-7.

Keywords: Curricula, National initiatives, Nutrition education, School age children, School health education, Standards

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. 2013. How can healthier school snacks and beverages improve student health and help school budgets?. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief focuses on how providing healthier school snacks and beverages can help improve students' health and school budgets. The brief provides an overview of the issue and discusses the availability of unhealthy snacks and beverages in schools, policies that restricts sales of unhealthy snacks and beverages in schools, and current policies.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Legislation, Nutrition, Obesity, Prevention, Public policy, School age children, Schools

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Healthy Eating Research. 2013. Recommendations for healthier beverages. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 6 pp.

Annotation: This paper focuses on the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and the corresponding risk of poor diet quality, obesity, diet-related health problems, and poor oral health. The paper provides detailed lists of recommended beverages for the following ages ranges: ages 2–4, 5–10, 11–13, 14–18, and 19 and above. A rationale for the recommendations is provided, along with a discussion of key findings of a panel of experts.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adults, Child health, Diet, Food consumption, Health, Nutrition, Obesity, Oral health, Risk factors, Sugar

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Team Nutrition. 2013. Grow it, try it, like it! Preschool fun with fruits and vegetables (rev.). Alexndria, VA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Team Nutrition, multiple items.

Annotation: This garden-themed, nutrition education kit for child care center staff introduces children to three fruits (peaches, strawberries, and cantaloupe) and three vegetables (spinach, sweet potatoes, and crookneck squash). The kit includes seven booklets with activities. A CD-ROM with supplemental information and a DVD with Cool Puppy Pup's Picnic and Lunch Parties are also available. Each set of lessons contains hands-on activities, planting activities, and nutrition education activities that introduce MyPlate. The kit can be used to promote learning at home with parent/child activities and family-sized recipes that give tips for cooking with children.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Team Nutrition, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 632, Alexandria, VA 22302, Telephone: (703) 305-1624 Fax: (703) 305-2549 Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Food handling, Health promotion, Learning, Materials for children, Nutrition education, Recipes, Young children

Wiecha JL, Gannett E, Roth B. [2012]. Healthy eating in out-of-school time: The promise and the challenge. (Wellesley, MA): National Institute for Out-of-School TIme at Wellesley Centers for Women, 7 pp.

Annotation: This report explores healthy eating concepts among out-of-school time (OST) program administrators and examines their perception of the importance of the childhood obesity epidemic. It also explores the perceived barriers to serving healthful foods in OST programs and examines the potential utility of guidelines and other managerial supports in helping such programs adopt healthy eating practices.

Contact: Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College, 106 Central Street, Wellesley, MA 02481, Telephone: (781) 283-2500 Fax: (781) 283-2504 E-mail: wcw@wellesley.edu Web Site: http://www.wcwonline.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care services, Child nutrition, Food consumption, Guidelines, Health promotion, School age children

Benjamin SE, ed. 2012. Making food healthy and safe for children: How to meet the Caring For Our Children national health and safety performance standards—Guidelines for out-of-home child care programs (2nd ed.). Chapel Hill, NC: National Training Institute for Child Care Health Consultants, 72 pp.

Annotation: This revised manual is intended to help child care providers provide children with safe and healthy food and meet nutrition standards. The manual discusses the following topics: (1) keeping everything clean and safe, (2) using foods that are safe to eat, (3) storing foods safely, (4) planning to meet children's nutritional needs, (5) promoting pleasant meals and snacks, and (6) helping children and families learn about food. References are included. The manual includes three appendices: (1) Caring for Our Children standards, (2) community resources, and (3) resource list. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Training Institute for Child Care Health Consultants, University of North Carolina, Department of Maternal and Child Health, 116-A South Merritt Mill Road, CB# 8126, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8126, Telephone: (919) 966-3780 Fax: (919) 843-4752 E-mail: nti@unc.edu Web Site: http://www.nti.unc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care centers, Family child care, Food safety, Health and safety, Nutrition, Out of home care, Standards

National Training Institute for Child Care Health Consultants. 2012. Healthy bodies: Promoting nutrition and physical activity through child care health consultation. Chapel Hill, NC: National Training Institute for Child Care Health Consultants,

Annotation: This course is designed for child care health consultants (CCHCs) and consists of five sections that present information relevant to promoting good nutrition and physical activity in the child care setting: the child care nutrition plan, requirements for food safety, meeting children’s nutritional needs, promoting healthy eating habits, and physical activity. The course includes a pre- and post-test, a feedback form, and links to training resources, which include a trainer's guide, slide presentation, a list of books for children about nutrition and physical activity, and other resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Training Institute for Child Care Health Consultants, University of North Carolina, Department of Maternal and Child Health, 116-A South Merritt Mill Road, CB# 8126, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8126, Telephone: (919) 966-3780 Fax: (919) 843-4752 E-mail: nti@unc.edu Web Site: http://www.nti.unc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child health programs, Child nutrition, Child safety, Consultants, Physical activity', Training

Save the Children. 2012. Nutrition in the first 1,000 days: State of the world's mothers 2012. Westport, CT: Save the Children, 70 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about which countries are doing the best—and the worst—at providing nutrition beginning during pregnancy and continuing through a child's second birthday. The report looks at six low-cost nutritional solutions, including breastfeeding, that have the potential to save lives, and discusses the affordability of these solutions. Also discussed are the global malnutrition crisis and why the first 1,000 days of a child's life are particularly important in terms of nutrition.

Contact: Save the Children, 501 Kings Highway East, Fairfield, CT 06825, Telephone: (203) 221-4000 Web Site: http://www.savethechildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Child death, Child health, Child nutrition, Child nutrition programs, Costs, Developing countries, Financing, Infant death, Infant health, Infant nutrition, International health, Maternal nutrition, Maternal nutrition programs, Nutrition, Pregnancy, Prevention, Public policy, Reproductive health, Women's health

U.S. Food and Nutrition Service. 2012. Nutrition standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs: Final rule. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 80 pp.

Annotation: This final rule updates the meal patterns and nutrition standards for the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs to align them with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. This rule requires most schools to increase the availability of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free and low-fat fluid milk in school meals; reduce the levels of sodium, saturated fat and trans fat in meals; and meet the nutrition needs of school children within their calorie requirements. These improvements to the school meal programs are based on recommendations made by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies and are intended to enhance the diet and health of school children while helping to reduce the upward trend in childhood obesity.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Dietary guidelines, Obesity, Prevention services, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs, Standards

Weight-control Information Network. 2012. Helping your child: Tips for parents. [Upd. ed.]. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 22 pp. (Healthy eating and physical activity across your lifespan)

Annotation: This booklet for parents offers information about how to help families learn healthy habits, healthy eating and physical activity. Topics discussed include how healthy eating and physical activity help children, how children's eating and activity habits are formed, what children should eat, how to help children eat better, how to help children be more active, and how to help overweight children. Information on serving sizes, sources of calcium, and snack ideas is also provided. Resources and suggestions for additional reading are included, as well. The booklet concludes with a tear-off checklist for encouraging healthy eating and physical activity.

Contact: Weight-Control Information Network, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, One Win Way, Bethesda, MD 20892-3665, Telephone: (877) 946-4627 Fax: (202) 828-1028 E-mail: WIN@info.niddk.nih.gov Web Site: http://win.niddk.nih.gov/index.htm Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub no. 04-4955.

Keywords: Body weight, Child health, Child nutrition, Consumer education materials, Food habits, Obesity, Physical activity, Snacks

Birch LL, Parker L, Burns A, eds; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Obesity Prevention Policies for Young Children. 2011. Early childhood obesity prevention policies. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 140 pp., brief (4 pp.)

Annotation: This report examines the evidence and provides guidance on obesity prevention policies for young children from birth to age 5. The recommendations outlined in the report are based on findings of the Institute of Medicine's Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention. Topics include assessing risk for obesity in young children; increasing physical activity and decreasing sedentary behavior; promoting healthy eating, creating healthful eating environments, and ensuring access to affordable foods; supporting breastfeeding; limiting children's exposure to marketing and screen time; and promoting age appropriate sleep duration among children.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu $49.00 plus shipping and handling; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-21657-9.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Child nutrition, Disease prevention, Health promotion, Obesity, Physical activity, Public policy, Risk factors, Sleep, Young children

Holt K, ed. 2011. Bright Futures nutrition (3rd ed.)—Pocket guide. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 79 pp.

Annotation: This pocket guide includes updated guidelines and tools for families and communities to improve the nutritional status of infants, children, and adolescents, and build a foundation for lifelong healthy eating behaviors. Contents include an introduction to the concept of building nutrition into overall health promotion, visions and goals, and the developmental and contextual approach to Bright Futures. It also discusses nutrition supervision for infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence and provides tools on nutrition risk, strategies, positive body image tips, food safety, and an outline of federal nutrition assistance programs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $14.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-58110-555-1.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Dietary guidelines, Infants, Nutrition, Nutrition education, Nutritional requirements, Physical activity, Young children

Parker L, Spear M, Holovach NF, Olson S and Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board, Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention. 2011. Legal strategies in childhood obesity prevention: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 94 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes a workshop held by the Institute of Medicine on October 21, 2010, to bring together stakeholders to discuss the current legal strategies (regulation, taxes, legislation, and litigation) aimed at combatting childhood obesity at the national, state, and local levels. It discusses legal approaches in other areas (air bags in automobiles and firearms); actions by federal agencies focusing on foods, beverages, and physical activity; perspectives from the grocery and restaurant industries; and other state and local obesity prevention strategies.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website after registration. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-21019-5.

Keywords: Child health, Legislation, Obesity, Prevention, Public health, Public policy

Stapley D. 2011. Role of nutrition in learning and behavior: A resource list for professionals. Beltsville, MD: Food and Nutrition Information Center, 30 pp.

Annotation: This document lists journal articles, websites, and other resources on the role of nutrition in learning and behavior in children. Topics include the role of nutrient status and school meal programs in learning and behavior and the relationship between school-based physical activity and academic performance in the United States and in non-U.S. countries.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Information Center, National Agricultural Library, 10301 Baltimore Avenue, Room 105, Beltsville, MD 20705-2351, Telephone: (301) 504-5719 Secondary Telephone: (301) 504-5248 Fax: (301) 504-6409 E-mail: fnic@nal.usda.gov Web Site: http://fnic.nal.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Behavior problems, Bibliographies, Children, International health, Learning, Nutrients, Nutrition, Physical activity, Research, Resources for professionals, School food services

Top K, Skalina R . 2011. Managing overweight and obesity in a school-based health center: A toolkit for providers. Denver, CO: Colorado Association for School-Based Health Care, 46 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit, which is intended to serve as a resource for health professionals in school-based health centers who are working to reduce childhood obesity, discusses screening for overweight and obesity and associated conditions, nutrition and fitness recommendations, motivational interviews and goal setting, stages of treatment, healthy lifestyle after-school programs, and coding for information related to childhood obesity. The toolkit also includes description of and links to other resources.

Contact: Colorado Association of School-Based Health Centers, 1801 Wiliams Street, Suite 400, Denver, CO 80218, Telephone: (303) 399-6380 Fax: (303) 350-4296 E-mail: info@casbhc.org Web Site: http://www.casbhc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Goals, Interviews, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Programs, Resource materials, School health, Screening, Treatment

Wendt M, Todd JE. 2011. The effect of food and beverage prices on children's weights. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report explores the effect of food prices on children’s Body Mass Index (BMI) based on variation in food prices across time and geographic areas. Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99, and the Quarterly Food-at-Home Price Database, the report presents findings indicating that lower prices for dark green vegetables and lowfat milk are associated with reduced BMI among children, while higher prices for soda, juices, starchy vegetables, and sweet snacks are associated with lower BMIs. The report concludes that the effect of subsidizing healthy food may be just as large as raising prices of less healthy foods. The appendices provide additional information on the Food-at-Home Price database and the Thrifty Food Plan (TFP), used to determine the maximum Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefit.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ERR-118.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Body weight, Child health, Comparative analysis, Costs, Data, Economic factors, Food, Food consumption, Obesity, Research, Studies

Maternal and Child Health Nutrition Council. [2010]. Improving the nutritional well-being of women, children and families. Johnstown, PA: Association of State and Territorial Public Health Nutrition Directors, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides information about strengthening the nutritional status of women, children, adolescents, and their families, including children with special health care needs. Topics include monitoring the nutritional well-being of maternal and child health (MCH) populations, public health nutrition work force, unmet state needs related to population-based MCH nutrition, MCH public health nutrition tasks and responsibilities, life course health development model, the MCH pyramid, the socio-ecologic model, and block grant opportunities.

Contact: Association of State Public Health Nutritionists, P.O. Box 1001, Johnstown, PA 15907-1001, Telephone: (814) 255-2829 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (814) 255-6514 Web Site: http://www.asphn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Block grants, Child health, Children with special health care needs, Families, MCH services, Nutrition, Public health, States, Women's health

Altarum Institute. 2010. Can WIC play a role in stemming the childhood obesity epidemic?. Washington, DC: Altarum Institute, (Altarum Institute policy roundtable)

Annotation: This report presents the proceedings from a policy roundtable to consider the role of WIC in childhood obesity prevention; how the WIC program is currently addressing childhood obesity; and what policy options are available to ensure WIC can be successful in addressing childhood obesity. The report includes background information on childhood obesity in America and the role WIC plays as a provider of food assistance and nutrition. The report includes a summary of roundtable presentations given by health professionals in the Washington Department of Health, the National WIC Association, and the California Department of Health Services and a transcription from the question and answer session that followed.

Contact: Altarum Institute, 3520 Green Court, Suite 300, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, Telephone: (734) 302-4600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 879-6505 Fax: (734) 302-4991 Web Site: http://www.altarum.org/contact Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Obesity, Policy development, Prevention programs, Program improvement, WIC Program

Choosy Kids. 2010. Choosy Kids: Be Choosy Be Healthy. Morgantown, WV: Choosy Kids,

Annotation: These training and educational materials are designed for health professionals, teachers, and parents seeking to help young children develop healthy behaviors. Topics include obesity, oral health, nutrition, and physical activity. News; information about events; links to resources by topic and by audience, such as Head Start and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) programs; and tools for submitting and sharing resources with others are also available on the website.

Contact: Choosy Kids, 3160 Collins Ferry Road, Morgantown, WV 26505, Telephone: (304) 777-4541 Fax: (304) 777-4543 E-mail: info@choosykids.com Web Site: http://www.choosykids.com Available from the website.

Keywords: , Audiovisual materials, Child health, DVDs, Head Start, Health behavior, Health promotion, Nutrition, Oral health, Parents, Physical activity, Resources for professionals, WIC Program, Young children

Potamites E, Gordon A. 2010. Children's food security and intakes from school meals. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica, ca. 135 pp. (Contractor and cooperator report no. 61)

Annotation: This report describes a study that examined the contributions of school meals to the food and nutrient intake of children in food-secure, marginally secure, and food-insecure households. The report includes a description of the data and methods, discusses characteristics of food-insecure and marginally secure students, compares dietary intakes by food security status, and discusses the percentage of school lunch foods consumed and food security and breakfast skipping.

Contact: National Agricultural Library, Abraham Lincoln Building, 10301 Baltimore Avenue, Beltsville, MD 20705-2351, Telephone: (301) 504-5755 Secondary Telephone: (301) 504-6856 Fax: (301) 504-6927 E-mail: lmooney@nal.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.nal.usda.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Food consumption, Hunger, Low income groups, Nutrition, Research, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs

Turner L, Chriqui J, Sandoval A. 2010. School policies and practices to improve health and prevent obesity: National Elementary School Survey results—Executive summary. Chicago, IL: Bridging the Gap, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the ways in which elementary school practices are not aligned with national recommendations concerning diet and physical activity. The findings are based on data obtained from administrators at nationally representative samples of public and private elementary schools that reflect policies and practices in schools during the 2006–07 and 2007–08 school years. Included are survey results related to the nutritional content of meals served through the National School Lunch Program; the availability of "competitive" foods — i.e., food or beverages sold through school stores, vending machines, and a la carte cafeteria lines — and to what extent public school students were offered daily and weekly physical education as recommended by the National Association of Sport and Physical Education.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Dietary Guidelines, Evaluation, Guidelines, Physical activity, School age children, School food services, School lunch programs, School surveys

Walker E, Chriqui J, Chiang RJ. 2010. Obesity prevention policies for middle and high schools: Are we doing enough?. Alexandria, VA: National Association of State Boards of Education, 46 pp. (Issues in brief)

Annotation: This report examines state- and district-level policies addressing nutrition and physical activity at the middle school and high school levels. The Data was collected from two sources: The State School Health Policy Database maintained by the National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE) and a nationally representative sample of more than 600 public school districts supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Bridging the Gap Program. The report summaries key findings related to nutrition and physical activity policy at the state and district levels and highlights areas where health policy is lacking. Included in the analysis is a review of school meal programs, physical education, and nutrition standards.

Contact: National Association of State Boards of Education, 2121 Crystal Drive, Suite 350 , Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (703) 684-4000 Fax: (703) 836-2313 E-mail: boards@nasbe.org Web Site: http://www.nasbe.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent nutrition, Data, Health policy, Nutrition policy, Physical activity, Policy analysis, School age children, School districts, School health programs, School surveys, State programs

White House Task Force on Childhood Obesity. 2010. Solving the problem of childhood obesity within a generation: Report to the president. [Washington, DC]: White House Task Force on Childhood Obesity, 120 pp.

Annotation: This report provides 70 specific recommendations for reducing childhood obesity. The recommendations fall into the following categories: (1) giving children a healthy start in life, (2) empowering parents and caregivers, (3) providing healthy food in schools, (4) improving access to healthy, affordable food, (5) helping children become more physically active.

Contact: Let's Move, Web Site: http://www.letsmove.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Breastfeeding, Child health, Communities, Costs, Early childhood education, Hunger, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prenatal care, Programs, Schools, Young children

Polhamus B, Dalenius K, Mackentosh H, Smith B, Grummer-Strawn L. 2009-. Pediatric nutrition surveillance. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity,

Annotation: This report summarizes selected data from the most recent year and highlights trends from the last 10 years on child health and nutrition indicators received from states, U.S. territories, and Indian tribal organizations that contributed to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Pediatric Nutrition Surveillance System. The data was collected on children enrolled in federally funded programs that serve low-income children. These programs include the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and other programs such as the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) program and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau Title V program. Tables display state-specific information indicating the prevalence of selected nutrition indicators for children under age five, including birthweight, breastfeeding, anemia, short stature, and obesity. The report also summarizes behavioral trends such as television viewing habits. Recommendations are provided for improving state and national pediatric nutrition programs.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Data, Federal programs, High risk children, Infant nutrition, Population surveillance

Cooper R, Levin M. 2009. School breakfast in America's big cities. Washington, DC: Food Research and Action Center, 16 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the performance of school breakfast programs in 25 large urban school districts during the 2008-09 school year, based on the results of a survey sent to food service staff by the Food Research and Action Center. The aim of the report is to monitor urban schools' progress in increasing breakfast participation among low-income students. Included in the report are statistics on the percentage of low-income children receiving breakfast in school; barriers to participation; promising practices case studies; and recommendations for policymakers and urban school district administrators are also provided.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Low income groups, Nutrition programs, School breakfast programs, School health, Surveys, Urban schools

Cooper R, Levin M. 2009. School breakfast scorecard: School year 2008-2009. Washington, DC: Food Research and Action Center, 20 pp.

Annotation: This report analyzes school breakfast participation for the 2008-2009 school year. The report provides information about who is eligible for the federal School Breakfast Program, discusses findings of the study, discusses child nutrition reauthorization, and provides school meals legislation by state as well as other state-by-state information.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Costs, Eligibility, Federal programs, Legislation, Low income groups, Nutrition, School breakfast programs, School-age children, State programs

National Diabetes Education Program. 2009. Tips for kids: How to lower your risk for type 2 diabetes. Bethesda, MD: National Diabetes Education Program, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for children and adolescents provides information about how to lower their risk for type 2 diabetes. It explains what the disease is and discusses what to do to stay healthy, what puts children and adolescents at risk, how to be active, how to make good food choices, and how to prepare healthy snacks.

Contact: National Diabetes Education Program, One Diabetes Way, Bethesda, MD 20841-9692, Telephone: (301) 496-3583 Web Site: http://ndep.nih.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 09-529K.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Consumer education materials, Diabetes mellitus, Food consumption, Materials for children, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Risk factors

Ritchie LD, Ho JJ, Allister CA. 2009. Intervening in early childhood to prevent obesity: Best practices for home and child care settings. Berkeley, CA: University of California, Berkeley, Center for Weight and Health, 19 pp.

Annotation: This report describes educational and environmental interventions designed to promote healthy eating in early childhood education settings, categorized as best practices, promising strategies, and research opportunities. Case studies are included.

Contact: University of California, Berkeley, Center for Weight and Health, U.C. College of Natural Resources, 101 Giannini Hall, #3100, Berkeley, CA 94720-3100, Telephone: (510) 642-2915 Fax: (510) 642-4612 E-mail: gwlopez@nature.berkeley.edu Web Site: http://cwh.berkeley.edu/

Keywords: Case studies, Child nutrition, Early childhood education, Model programs, Obesity, Prevention programs, Young children

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. 2009. Improving child nutrition policy: Insights from National USDA Study of School Food Environments. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 4 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief offers information about the third School Nutrition Dietary Assessment Study, which provides the most comprehensive and up-to-date information on the overall food environment in public elementary, middle, and high schools. The brief presents key findings of the survey in three categories: competitive foods, school meals, and policy recommendations.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent nutrition, Child nutrition, Elementary schools, High schools, Middle schools, Public policy, School food services

Ver Ploeg M. 2009. WIC and the battle against childhood overweight. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 4 pp. (Economic brief; no. 13)

Annotation: This brief examines trends in the relationship between WIC participation and weight status by updating the results of the analysis titled Food and Nutrition Assistance Programs and Obesity: 1976-2002. That analysis has been updated to include more recently released data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The brief presents background and methodology and discusses the fact that body weight is not related to WIC participation. Instructions on calculating body mass index are included.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Body weight, Child health, Low income groups, Nutrition, Obesity, Trends, WIC program

Wandner D, Hair E. 2009. Research-based recommendations to improve child nutrition in schools and out-of-school time programs. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 6 pp.

Annotation: This paper discusses aspects of healthy diets for children in elementary and middle school. It summarizes the current federal guidelines and recommendations for child nutrition and provides information for schools and out-of-school time programs about how to measure child nutrition.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: After school programs, Child nutrition, Guidelines, Nutrition education, Nutrition programs, School age children, School food services

Action for Healthy Kids. 2008. Progress or promises?: What's working for and against healthy schools. [Skokie, IL]: Action for Healthy Kids, 56 pp.

Annotation: This report presents perspectives gathered by interview of school administrators, parents, educators, nutrition and health professionals, wellness advocates, federal and local government agencies, community groups, school board members, students, and others on the progress towards implementing healthy eating and physical activity programs in schools and the deficits that remain after five years of work by Action for Healthy Kids and like-minded groups at the national, state, and grassroots levels. In addition to perceptions of healthy eating and physical activity programs, the report assesses the growth of public awareness about school wellness, stakeholder roles and activities, and resources. The report identifies gaps to be addressed in future initiatives.

Contact: Action for Healthy Kids, 600 W. Van Buren Street, Suite 720, Chicago, IL 60607-3758, Telephone: (800) 416-5136 Fax: (312) 212-0098 E-mail: info@actionforhealthykids.org Web Site: http://www.actionforhealthykids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Community programs, Disease prevention, Exercise, Family school relations, Health education, Health promotion, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical education, Programs, School health education, School lunch programs

Davidson JC. 2008. What's right for kids II: Building healthy nutrition and physical activity environments at school. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report describes best practices that school nutrition and wellness leaders have implemented in Wisconsin to positively impact student achievement. It also provides tools to define and support an environment that promotes healthy eating and activity. It addresses the characteristics and activities of a successful wellness team, how parents promote a healthy school environment, physical activity and healthy eating, how students can be involved in the process, healthy eating and good nutrition, and how to evaluation local wellness policies.

Contact: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 125 South Webster Street, Madison, WI 53707-7841, Telephone: (608) 266-8960 Secondary Telephone: (800) 441-4563 Web Site: http://dpi.state.wi.us/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Communities, Community programs, Families, Family school relations, Food consumption, Nutrition, Nutrition programs, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Schools, Wisconsin

Millimet DL, Tchernis R, Husain M. 2008. School nutrition programs and the incidence of childhood obesity. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic REsearch, 53 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14297)

Annotation: This paper uses data on over 13,500 early-elementary-school children to assess the relationship between School Breakfast Program and National School Lunch Program participation and child weight. The paper provides background information (on the school nutrition programs themselves as well as on the previous literature), presents a theoretical framework for thinking about school nutrition programs, describes the empirical methodology and data, and presents results.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Body weight, Child health, Low income groups, Nutrition, Obesity, Research, School age children, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs

Committee on Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools, Stallings VA, Yaktine AL, eds. 2007. Nutrition standards for foods in schools: Leading the way toward healthier youth. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 282 pp.

Annotation: This book offers reviews and recommendations about appropriate nutrition standards and guidance for the sale, content, and consumption of foods and beverages at school, with attention given to foods and beverages offered in competition with federally reimbursable meals and snacks. Topics include nutrition-related health concerns, dietary intakes, eating behaviors in children and adolescents, the school environment, and food and beverages sold outside the school meal program. Additional topics include federal, state, local, and industry initiatives; recommended standards and actions for competitive foods in schools and next steps. References are provided as well as appendices including acronyms and a glossary; energy requirements; nutrition standards for competitive foods sold in elementary, middle, or high school set by states; additional guidelines, open sessions at a workshop on nutrition standards for schools, and biographical sketches of members of the authoring committee. An index concludes the book.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-10383-1.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Child behavior, Elementary schools, High schools, Junior high schools, Nutrition assessment, School food services, School lunch programs, Standards

Harris ML, Dillon C, Nelson R. 2007. Healthy schools, healthy communities, and youth obesity: Lessons learned from the national forums and regional dialogues of the NACo Center for Sustainable Communities. Washington, DC: Center for Sustainable Communities, National Association of Counties, 19 pp.

Annotation: This publication describes insights from three 2006 dialogues called to discuss the challenges and opportunities of using school programs to improve youth health and fitness and contains practical, replicable information for community leaders. Contents include a brief summary of how the dialogues were hosted and facilitated, the challenges and opportunities faced in improving youth health in collaboration with schools, the strategies and actions implemented, and a description of two related forums conducted with African American and Latino county officials on the impacts of obesity of the youth in their communities and their specific community and cultural challenges. Appendices include contact information and a questionnaire for participants in the dialogues.

Contact: National Association of Counties, 25 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 393-6226 Web Site: http://www.naco.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Cultural factors, Exercise, Health promotion, Hispanic Americans, Obesity, Physical education, Physical fitness, Prevention programs, School age children, School health education, Youth

Koplan JP, Liverman CT, Kraak VI, Wisham SL, eds.; Food and Nutrition Board, Committee on Progress in Preventing Childhood Obesity. 2007. Progress in preventing childhood obesity: How do we measure up?. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 475 pp., 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: This book reviews the progress in combatting childhood obesity and discusses the next steps toward developing a robust evidence base for effective childhood obesity prevention intervention and practices. Contents include the framework for evaluating progress; diverse populations; issues in environments such as government, industry, communities, schools, and homes; and assessing the nation's progress. Appendices include a chart explaining acronyms; a glossary; data sources, indicators, and evaluation tools for measuring progress; examples of recent federal agency programs, initiatives, and surveillance systems for supporting and monitoring prevention efforts; a compilation of recommendations and implementation actions; summaries of three regional symposia called during the project; and biographical sketches of committee members and staff. The book concludes with an index. Complete report and symposia summaries are provided on a CD-ROM enclosed with the book.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu $55.00 plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: CD-ROMs, Children, Federal initiatives, Obesity, Prevention programs, Program evaluation

Institute of Medicine. 2006. Perspectives on the prevention of childhood obesity in children and youth. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 52 pp. (The Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Lectures 2004)

Annotation: This publication is a transcript of a lecture presented as part of the Rosenthal lecture program. The topic of the lecture is the prevention of childhood obesity.The transcript includes a welcome speech and several speeches by different speakers on the following issues: (1) overview of preventing childhood obesity, (2) framework for prevention and perspectives on addressing health disparities, (3) industry perspective, and (4) government perspective. The transcript also includes a discussion among the different speakers. The publication concludes with speakers biosketches.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-10072-0.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Obesity, Prevention

Institute of Medicine, Committee on Progress in Preventing Childhood Obesity. 2006. Progress in preventing childhood obesity: Focus on communities—Brief summary: Institute of Medicine Regional Symposium. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 36 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a brief summary of the regional symposium, Progress in Preventing Childhood Obesity: Focus on Communities, held on October 6-7, 2005, in Atlanta, Georgia. The symposium focused on specific recommendations for stakeholders at the local, state, regional, and federal levels to explore how to create healthy communities for U.S. children and adolescents. Recommendations are from the Institute of Medicine report, Preventing Childhood Obesity: Health in the Balance. This summary highlights recurring themes that emerged from the symposium for accelerating change and moving forward with obesity prevention efforts: (1) empower communities and neighborhoods, (2) change the environment, (3) forge strategic partnerships, (4) garner and mobilize political support, (5) educate stakeholders, (6) identify leaders and build on cultural assets, (7) collect and disseminate local data, (8) evaluate programs and interventions, and (9) translate successful interventions to other communities. A program agenda is included.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-65382-2.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Communities, Conference proceedings, Obesity, Prevention

Institute of Medicine, Committee on Progress in Preventing Childhood Obesity. 2006. Progress in preventing childhood obesity: Focus on industry—Brief summary: Institute of Medicine Regional Symposium. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a summary of the Institute of Medicine's (IOM's) regional symposium, Progress in Preventing Childhood Obesity: Focus on Industry, held in Irvine, California, on December 1, 2005. The symposium focused on the specific IOM report recommendations for stakeholders within industry and the media to explore how to create healthy marketplaces and media for children and adolescents. The summary highlights recurring themes for accelerating change and how industry collectively can move forward with obesity prevention efforts that emerged from the symposium. These themes include (1) reverse the obesity trend; (2) market health nutrition; (3) make a business commitment to health; (4) change the food and physical activity environment; (5) forge strategic partnerships; (6) garner political support to ally public health and industry; (7) educate stakeholders; (8) collect, disseminate, and share local data; and (9) evaluate programs and interventions. Concluding comments and a program agenda are also included.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-66024-6.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Health education, Industry, Intervention, Marketing, Mass media, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Program evaluation, Public health, Trends

McGinnis JM, Gootman JA, Kraak VI, eds.; Committee on Food Marketing and the Diets of Children and Youth. 2006. Food marketing to children and youth: Threat or opportunity?. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 516 pp.

Annotation: This book reviews scientific studies designed to assess the influence of marketing on the nutritional beliefs, choices, practices, and outcomes for children and youth. Chapter topics include health, diet, and eating patterns; food and beverage marketing; the influence of marketing on the diets and diet-related health of children and youth; and public policy issues in food and beverage marketing. Findings, recommendations, and next steps are summarized at the conclusion. References are provided at the end of each chapter. Appendices include a list of acronyms, a glossary, a literature review, statistical tables and more references, as well as an agenda of a workshop program held January 27, 2005 and biographical sketches of committee members and staff.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-09713-4.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent nutrition, Child health, Child nutrition, Diet, Food consumption, Food habits, Literature reviews, Market research

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Brookings Institution. 2006. Childhood obesity. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 224 pp. (The future of children; v. 16, no. 1, Spring 2006)

Annotation: This issue of "The Future of Children" features nine articles on the high and rising rates of overweight and obesity among U.S. children, presenting evidence on the multiple causes, consequences, and methods of dealing with the growing problem. Also discussed are the roles played by the built environment, schools, child care settings, and parents. Each article concludes with end notes.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adverse effects, Body weight, Child health, Disease prevention, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Risk factors

Wootan M, Johanson J, Powell J. 2006. School foods report card: A state-by-state evaluation of policies for foods and beverages sold through vending machines, school stores, a la carte, and other venues outside of school meals. Washington, DC: Center for Science in the Public Interest, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a state-by-state evaluation of policies for foods and beverages sold through vending machines, school stores, a la carte, and other venues outside school meals.The report is based on nutrition polices of all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The report grades each state policy on five key considerations: (1) beverage nutrition standards, (2) food nutrition standards, (3) grade level(s) to which policies apply, (4) time during the school day to which policies apply, and (5) location(s) on campus to which these policies apply. The report also provides a discussion of state policies and their implications, as well as recommendations. The report includes three appendices: (1) model school nutrition standards for foods and beverages sold outside meals, (2) state school foods report card, and (3) summary of state policies for foods and beverages sold out of vending machines, school stores, and other venues outside school meals. References are included.

Contact: Center for Science in the Public Interest, 1220 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 332-9110 Fax: (202) 265-4954 E-mail: cspi@cspinet.org Web Site: http://www.cspinet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Evaluation, Food, Health policy, Nutrition, Public policy, School age children, School food services

BSCS Development Team. 2005. The science of energy balance: Calorie intake and physical activity. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 1 v. (NIH curriculum supplement series, grades 7-8)

Annotation: This educational module, which is intended for middle-school students, introduces students to the science of energy balance and the relationship between calorie intake and physical activity. The module has four objectives: (1) introduce students to the key concepts of energy balance and provide a context within which nutrition concepts learned at other times can be better understood, (2) allow students to develop the understanding that achieving energy balance is a long-term rather than a short-term goal, (3) convey to students the importance of scientific research, and (4) encourage students to think about the relationships between knowledge, choice, behavior, and health. The module consists of five lessons. A Web site is available that can help instructors organize their use of the module, engage student interest, and orchestrate and individualize instruction.

Contact: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892, Telephone: (301) 496-3583 Fax: E-mail: niddkinquiries@nih.gov Web Site: http://www.niddk.nih.gov/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-929614-15-2.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Curricula, Decision making, Educational materials, Middle school, Obesity, Physical activity, School health education, Students

California Pan-Ethnic Health Network and Consumers Union. 2005. Out of balance: Marketing of soda, candy, snacks, and fast foods drowns out healthful messages. Oakland, CA: California Pan-Ethnic Health Network; San Francisco, CA: Consumers Union, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report uses recently released data to highlight the way that food, beverage, and fast food advertising my be contributing to the rise in obesity in the United States. The report discusses the relationship between eating trends and advertising trends, food and beverage marketing expenditures vs. expenditures of the 5 A Day program, unmeasured media (e.g., direct mail, couponing, special events), marketing to communities of color, marketing to children, and the 5 A Day Program. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. Recommendations and endnotes are included.

Contact: Consumers Union, West Coast Regional Office, 1535 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103-2512, Telephone: (415) 431-6747 Fax: (415) 431-0906 Web Site: http://www.consumersunion.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advertising, Child health, Costs, Food habits, Health, Mass media, Minority health, Obesity, Trends

Center for Science in the Public Interest. 2005. Guidelines for responsible food marketing to children. Washington, DC: Center for Science in the Public Interest, 6 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines are intended for those who manufacture, sell, market, advertise, or otherwise promote food to children. The guidelines provide criteria for marketing food to children in a manner that does not undermine their diets or harm their health. The guidelines discuss obesity and unhealthy eating habits among children, supporting parents' efforts to foster healthy eating habits in children, protecting children from marketing of foods that can harm their health, nutrition guidelines, and marketing techniques.

Contact: Center for Science in the Public Interest, 1220 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 332-9110 Fax: (202) 265-4954 E-mail: cspi@cspinet.org Web Site: http://www.cspinet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Food consumption, Food habits, Guidelines, Marketing, Nutrition, Nutrition policy, Obesity

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2005. 5 a day works!. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 117 pp.

Annotation: This publication, which advocates a diet that includes five to nine servings of fruit and vegetables a day, is a collection of innovative programs and interventions that promote healthy eating. Topics covered include (1) environmental innovations (such as farmers markets and restaurants), (2) event and media innovations, (3) partnerships and coalitions, (4) youth innovations, and (5) program resumes. Two appendices includes references and an index of programs.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Fruit, Health promotion, Intervention, Local programs, Mass media, Nutrition, State programs, Vegetables, Youth

Education Commission of the States. 2005. State policies related to student health and nutrition. Denver, CO: Education Commission of the States, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report consists primarily of tables that explore the various policy solutions that many states have employed related to student health and nutrition. The information comes from state statutory law. The tables provide information about the following for each state: (1) state has created a task force or committee to improve nutrition, fitness, or both in schools; (2) state has set nutritional standards for school meals beyond federal reguations; (3) state law restricts the sale of competetive foods; (4) state addresses employment of a physical activity coordinator, a nutrition specialist, or both; and (5) state mandates physical activity requirements. An overview is included.

Contact: Education Commission of the States, 700 Broadway, Suite 810, Denver, CO 80203-3460, Telephone: (303) 299-3600 Fax: (303) 296-8332 E-mail: ecs@ecs.org Web Site: http://www.ecs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Food, Nutrition, Physical activity, Public policy, School age children, School health, School lunch programs

Henchy G. 2005. WIC in the states: Thirty-one years of building a healthier America. Washington, DC: Food Research and Action Center, 185 pp.

Annotation: This report contains fact sheets about the national, state, and Indian Tribal Organization WIC program, as well as a profile of the history of the program. Each fact sheet includes a brief narrative, a figure illustrating WIC participation over the years, and a table listing the number of women, infants, and children participating in the program over the years. The report also includes a summary.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Federal programs, Infant health, Low income groups, Nutrition programs, State programs, Statistical data, WIC Program, Women's health

National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity. 2005. Model local school wellness policies on physical activity and nutrition. Washington, DC: National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity, 26 pp.

Annotation: These model school wellness policies on physical activity and nutrition, which are intended for use by school districts, are based on nutrition science, public health research, and existing practices from exemplary states and local school districts around the country. The policies include a background section, a discussion of how to use the policies, a list of organizations that assisted with or supported the development of the policies, and the policies themselves. Policy goals are presented, as well as steps that school districts can take to achieve the goals. The section on achieving policy goals is divided into the following subsections: (1) school health councils, (2) nutritional quality of foods and beverages sold and served on campus, (3) nutrition and physical activity promotion and food marketing, (4) physical activity opportunities and physical education, (5) monitoring and policy review, and (6) resources for local school wellness policies on nutrition and physical activity.

Contact: Center for Science in the Public Interest, 1220 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 332-9110 Fax: (202) 265-4954 E-mail: cspi@cspinet.org Web Site: http://www.cspinet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Health promotion, Marketing, Models, Monitoring, Physical activity, Physical education, Public policy, Resource materials, School districts, School health, Schools

National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. 2005. We Can! (Ways to Enhance Children's Activity and Nutrition): Energize our families—Curriculum for parents and caregivers. Bethesda, MD: National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, 165 pp.

Annotation: This curriculum is designed to help parents and caregivers encourage healthy weight in children and adolescents ages 8-13. Contents include six lessons focused on building skills for increasing access and availability of healthy foods and making healthy food choices, increasing physical activity, and reducing recreational screen time.

Contact: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Information Center, P.O. Box 30105, Bethesda, MD 20824-0105, Telephone: (301) 592-8573 Secondary Telephone: (240) 629-3255 Fax: (301) 592-8563 E-mail: NHLBIinfo@nhlbi.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/infoctr/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Curricula, Families, Health education, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. 2005. We Can! (Ways to Enhance Children's Activity and Nutrition): Families finding the balance—A parent handbook. Bethesda, MD: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 26 pp.

Annotation: This handbook for parents provides information about overweight in children and offers strategies for enhancing parents' and children's activity and nutrition. Topics covered include (1) why should we care about our weight, (2) what can my family and I do to encourage a healthy weight? (3) energy balance: the heart of the matter, (4) energy in: focusing on food choices and portion sizes, and (5) energy out: physical activity and screen time. Also included are estimated calorie requirements, a table of foods to encourage and foods to avoid, a table showing how portion sizes have grown over the past 20 years, and a guide to calories burned in common activities. The handbook concludes with a list of resources.

Contact: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Information Center, P.O. Box 30105, Bethesda, MD 20824-0105, Telephone: (301) 592-8573 Secondary Telephone: (240) 629-3255 Fax: (301) 592-8563 E-mail: NHLBIinfo@nhlbi.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/infoctr/index.htm Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: NIH pub. no. 05-5273.

Keywords: Body weight, Calories, Children, Consumer education materials, Nutrition, Obesity, Parents, Physical activity, Weight management

Okie S. 2005. Fed up!: Winning the war against childhood obesity. Washington, DC: Joseph Henry Press, 336 pp.

Annotation: This book, which is intended for parents, teachers, public heath officials, physicians, and community leaders, provides information to help battle childhood obesity. The book offers detailed advice for taking action against childhood obesity at home, at school, in the community, and at both state and national levels. The book provides an overview of the current scientific understanding about what factors in the environment are contributing to to epidemic of childhood obesity and explains what we know about genetic vulnerability to obesity and how the human body regulates its appetite and energy expenditure to maintain a constant weight. It examines how children's weight is related to their body image, mood, and relationships; discusses how to foster healthy eating and promote physical activity; talks about making school environments healthier; offers information on treating childhood obesity; and suggests ways in which people can work to prevent obesity. A list of resources, notes, acknowledgments, and an index are included.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-09310-4.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition, Communities, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Schools, Treatment

Oliveira V, Chandran R. 2005. Issues in food assistance: Effects of WIC participation on children's food consumption. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Services, 4 pp. (Food assistance and nutrition research report; no. 26-11)

Annotation: The study described in this report compared nutrition consumption patterns of WIC children with those of three different comparison groups: eligible nonparticipating children living in non-WIC households, eligible nonparticipating children living in WIC households, and children living in households whose income is too high to be eligible for WIC. The report describes the issue, provides background, describes the methodology, and presents findings and conclusions. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. A list of information sources is provided.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website. Document Number: FANRR26-11.

Keywords: Child health, Food consumption, Low income groups, Nutrition, WIC Program

Oliveira, V, Chandran R. 2005. Children's consumption of WIC-approved foods. Washington, DC: Economic Research Service, 35 pp. (Food assistance and nutrition research report no. 44)

Annotation: This report describes a study that compared consumption patterns of WIC children with those of three different comparison groups: eligible nonparticipating children living in non-WIC households, eligible nonparticipating children living in WIC households, and children living in households whose income is too high to be eligible for WIC. The report includes a summary, an overview of the WIC program, a description of the data, a descriptive analysis, a regression analysis of the effects of WIC participation, the effects associated with WIC participation, a discussion, conclusions, and references. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report includes one appendix: a history of WIC food packages.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Eligibility, Food consumption, Infants, Low income groups, Research, WIC Program

Rosenthal J. 2005. Enhancing state and local capacity to promote healthy weight in children: Addressing disparities in the real world. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, ca. 100 pp.

Annotation: This report is intended to provide practical information that states and community groups can use to implement projects aimed at reducing disparities in childhood overweight. It provides snapshots of 15 state and local initiatives that address such disparities and lessons learned from project representatives who attended a meeting to discuss their approaches. The report, which includes an executive summary, is divided into four major sections: programmatic approaches, policy change, collaboration, and evaluation of program effectiveness and sustainability. Each section includes an overview; elaborates on key themes discussed in the meeting, including relevant examples from the participating projects; and provides information about tools available for use. The report also includes four appendices: (1) list of project participants and Web sites, (2) project summaries, (3) other Web sites and resources, and (4) list of Delaware participants.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Collaboration, Community programs, Local initiatives, Obesity, Public policy, State initiatives, State programs

U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and U.S. Department of Education. 2005. Making it happen!: School nutrition success stories. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 354 pp.

Annotation: This report tells the stories of schools and school districts that have implemented innovative strategies to improve the nutritional quality of foods and beverages sold outside of Federal meal programs. Topics include the importance of healthy eating for children and adolescents, how schools can support good nutrition, and the process of change and school nutrition policies. Stories are divided into six chapters based on the primary approach used to promote healthy eating. A variety of support materials are also included. Stories are also accessible via an online interface that may be searched by category, location, grade, and keyword.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent nutrition, Child nutrition, School food services, School lunch programs, Schools

Walker JN, Del Rosso JM, Held AK. 2005. Nutrition and physical activity field assessment of children in rural America. Wesport, CT: Save the Children, 37 pp.

Annotation: This assessment of nutrition and physical activity status of children in rural areas consisted of in-depth interviews and focus groups with 45 partner communities in Kentucky, West Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee, Arizona, New Mexico, and California. The report, which includes an executive summary and an overview of obesity prevalence, causes, and consequences, presents findings on the problems of obesity among rural children and on types of interventions to prevent it. The report offers a strategy for preventing obesity among children in rural America. Four appendices include a list of partner sites, sample elementary school breakfast and lunch menus, a list of obesity-related legislation passed during 1999-2003 by Save the Children states, and a list of related initiatives.

Contact: Save the Children, 501 Kings Highway East, Fairfield, CT 06825, Telephone: (203) 221-4000 Web Site: http://www.savethechildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition, Community programs, Focus groups, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Research, Rural populations

We Can! (Ways to Enhance Children's Activity and Nutrition). 2005. Families finding the balance: A parent handbook. [Bethesda, MD]: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 26 pp.

Annotation: This parent handbook is based on the We Can program, a public education outreach program designed to help children and adolescents ages 8-13 stay at a healthy weight through improving food choices, increasing physical activity, and reducing screen time. The handbook is divided into six chapters: (1) why should we care about our weight?, (2) what can my family and I do to encourage a healthy weight?, (3) energy balance: the heart of the matter, (4) Energy IN: focusing on food choices and portion size, (5) energy OUT: physical activity and screen time, and (6) resources.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 05-5273 (English); NIH Pub. No. 05-5274 (Spanish) .

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Consumer education materials, Education, Families, Federal programs, Food consumption, Nutrition, Obesity, Outreach, Television

Action for Healthy Kids. [2004]. Criteria for evaluating school-based approaches to increasing good nutrition and physical activity. [Skokie, IL]: Action for Healthy Kids, 15 pp., exec. sum. (6 pp.).

Annotation: This report defines a set of standard criteria for creating and evaluating school-based approaches for improving nutrition and physical activity. It describes the methodology for developing the evaluation criteria, lists the criteria, and suggests incentives for encouraging the adoption of school-based approaches to increase children's good nutrition and physical activity. The criteria can be applied to a broad range of approaches: policies, programs, interventions, and practices. The report also include a list of expert panel members, a sample evaluation form, sample selections from the "what's working" database, and a list of partner organizations involved in the steering committee.

Contact: Action for Healthy Kids, 600 W. Van Buren Street, Suite 720, Chicago, IL 60607-3758, Telephone: (800) 416-5136 Fax: (312) 212-0098 E-mail: info@actionforhealthykids.org Web Site: http://www.actionforhealthykids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Health promotion, Nutrition, Physical activity, Program evaluation, School age children, School linked programs, Schools

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. [2004]. Site specific approaches: Prevention or management of pediatric obesity—Summary report. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 150 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes presentations and discussions from the Workshop on Site Specific Approaches to the Prevention or Management of Pediatric Obesity, held on July 14-15, 2004, in Bethesda, Maryland. Workshop sessions focused on the following topics: (1) school-based intervention studies; (2) home, other underutilized sites, and novel modalities; and (3) community and trans-community sites. A discussion of breakout groups and a breakout summary are included. The conference was sponsored by 10 federal agencies.

Contact: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892, Telephone: (301) 496-3583 Fax: E-mail: niddkinquiries@nih.gov Web Site: http://www.niddk.nih.gov/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Community programs, Intervention, Management, Obesity, Prevention, School health programs

Center for Science in the Public Interest. 2004. Dispensing junk: How school vending undermines efforts to feed children well. Washington DC: Center for Science in the Public Interest, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a survey undertaken to determine the contents of vending machines in 251 schools in 24 states, provides survey results, offers a rationale for improving school foods, and provides a conclusion. The report includes one appendix: the survey form. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. References and contacts for more information are included.

Contact: Center for Science in the Public Interest, 1220 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 332-9110 Fax: (202) 265-4954 E-mail: cspi@cspinet.org Web Site: http://www.cspinet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent nutrition, Child nutrition, Food, Obesity, Schools, Surveys

Children's Sentinel Nutrition Assessment Program. 2004. The safety net in action: Protecting the health and nutrition of young American children. Boston, MA: Children's Sentinel Nutrition Assessment Program, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the safety net that supports the access to nutritious food by infants, children, and their families. The report discusses the social and economic context of food insecurity; explains the meaning the food insecurity; describes Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, the Food Stamp Program, WIC, the Low-Income Energy Assistance Program, and subsidized housing; and includes a call to action. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. An appendix provides an overview of the Children's Sentinel Nutrition Assessment Program. The report concludes with a list of references and acknowledgments.

Contact: Children's HealthWatch, Dowling Building, 771 Albany Street, Ground Floor, Boston, MA 02118, Telephone: (617) 414-6366 Fax: (617) 414-7915 E-mail: childrenshealthwatch@childrenshealthwatch.org Web Site: http://www.childrenshealthwatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Families, Food stamp program, Housing programs, Infant health, Low income groups, Nutrition, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, WIC Program

Foster LK, Gerould P. 2004. Fathers' impact on children's nutrition. Sacramento, CA: California Research Bureau, 42 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is based on input from focus groups and research, looks at the relationship between fathers and children as it relates to children's nutrition. The report offers several options for policymakers that focus on targeting and outreach to fathers. The report, which includes an executive summary, also contains the following sections: (1) nutrition as a public policy issue, (2) fathers' involvement with their children, (3) fathers, children, and food, (4) food assistance resources, (5) a note about physical activity, (6) options for action, (7) bibliography, and (8) endnotes. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. The report includes black-and-white drawings.

Contact: California Research Bureau, California State Library, 900 N Street, Suite 300, Sacramento, CA 94237-0001, Telephone: (916) 445-3551 Secondary Telephone: (916) 653-7843 Fax: (916) 654-5829 E-mail: crb@library.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.library.ca.gov/crb/index.html Available from the website. Document Number: CRB 04-002.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Fathers, Food banks, Low income groups, Obesity, Outreach, Parent child relations, Physical activity, Public policy, Supplemental food programs

Gordon A, Hartline-Grafton H, Nogales R. 2004. Innovative WIC practices: Profiles of 20 programs. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 258 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study that examined a range of innovative practices at 20 state or local WIC agencies. The study focused on practices in three main areas: breastfeeding promotion and support (including peer counseling and programs for high-risk groups), nutrition and health education (including obesity prevention, preventive health care, and staff training), and service delivery (such as home and workplace visits). For each program, the report provides background information and discusses the source of the innovation, key challenges, implementation lessons learned, evidence of success, and the feasibility of repeating the practice. The report includes an executive summary and conclusions. Two appendices include (1) procedures for selecting programs and collecting data and (2) protocols. The report includes footnotes and references.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website. Document Number: E-FAN-04-007.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Health care delivery, Health education, Local MCH programs, Model programs, Nutrition, State MCH programs, WIC Program

Schoenberg J, Salmond K, Fleshman P. 2004. Weighing in: Helping girls be healthy today, healthy tomorrow. New York, NY: Girl Scout Research Institute, 33 pp. (Research review)

Annotation: This report identifies key research trends for children and adolescents in the areas of health, nutrition, and physical activity as they relate to child obesity and weight issues. The report also focuses on gender and cultural issues in the research, especially with regard to girls' body image. The main social environments in which girls participate are explored, as is the role of media and marketing. Conclusions and next steps, references, and resources are included.

Contact: Girl Scouts of the USA, 420 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10018-2798, Telephone: (800) 478-7248 Secondary Telephone: (212) 852-8000 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.girlscouts.org $3.50, plus shipping and handling; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent health, Body image, Child health, Cultural factors, Female children, Marketing, Mass media, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Research, Trends

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. 2004. Helping your overweight child. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 4 pp.

Annotation: This pamphlet provides information and health strategies for parents whose children are overweight. Families are encouraged to adopt healthy eating habits, reduce fat intake, and increase physical activity rather than placing the child on a restrictive diet or using food as a reward or punishment. Parents are advised to consult a health professional to determine whether the child's weight is within a healthy range or whether the child will "grow into" a healthy weight. Basic nutrition information and tips for changing attitudes about food are provided. Additional reading and resources are suggested. The publication was field tested for appropriate reading level and design.

Contact: Weight-Control Information Network, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, One Win Way, Bethesda, MD 20892-3665, Telephone: (877) 946-4627 Fax: (202) 828-1028 E-mail: WIN@info.niddk.nih.gov Web Site: http://win.niddk.nih.gov/index.htm Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: NIH 04-4096.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Diet, Exercise, Obesity, Weight loss

Action for Healthy Kids. 2003. Taking action for healthy kids: A report on the Healthy Schools Summit and the Action for Healthy Kids Initiative. [Skokie, IL]: Action for Healthy Kids, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights ideas and solutions shared at the Healthy Schools Summit convened in October 2002 in Washington, DC. The report sets forth the Action for Healthy Kids vision for creating health-promoting schools that support sound nutrition and physical activity. The report includes the following sections: (1) letters from Dr. David Satcher and Mrs. Laura Bush, (2) the shape of our nation's children: an epidemic of overweight and obesity, (3) charting a healthier course for students, (4) commitment to change, (5) building the link between health and achievement, (6) schools: the ideal setting for change, (7) nutrition: letting students practice what they're learning, (8) physical activity and physical education: learning in action, (9) state teams: mobilizing to take Action for Healthy Kids, (10) Healthy School Heroes: leading the way, and (11) Healthy Schools Summit Agenda. The report also includes references and a list of steering committee members.

Contact: Action for Healthy Kids, 600 W. Van Buren Street, Suite 720, Chicago, IL 60607-3758, Telephone: (800) 416-5136 Fax: (312) 212-0098 E-mail: info@actionforhealthykids.org Web Site: http://www.actionforhealthykids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition, Conferences, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical education, School health education, School lunch programs, Schools, Students

Gordon A, Briefel R, Needels K., Wemmerus N, Zavitsky T, Russo R, Tasse T, Kalb L, Peterson A, Creel D. 2003. Feeding low-income children when school is out: The Summer Food Service Program. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 419 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the results of the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) Implementation Study, a descriptive study of the operations of the SFSP at the state and local levels. The study addressed the following three major research questions: (1) How does the SFSP operate at the state, sponsor, and site levels? (2) What factors affect participation by sponsors and children? And (3) what is the nutritional quality of meals served, and what is the extent of plate waste? Section topics include study objectives and design, program characteristics, program administration, outreach and participation, meal service, and conclusions on administration simplification, expanding participation, improving meals, and reducing waste. References conclude the report. Statistical data are presented in table and figure formats throughout the report.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website. Document Number: E-FAN-03-001.

Keywords: Outreach, Participation, Program evaluation, School food services, School lunch programs

Institute of Pediatric Nutrition. 2003. Parents' survival guide to transitional feeding. [Columbus, OH]: Institute of Pediatric Nutrition, 30 pp.

Annotation: This feeding guide, which describes the basics of food and nutrition, is designed for parents of healthy term infants and children ages 4 to 24 months. The guide is divided into two main sections. Section 1, transitional feeding essentials, covers nutrition basics focused on developmental milestones. Section 2, at-a-glance survival handouts, serves as an appendix that can be quickly accessed for addressing common feeding issues.

Contact: Institute of Pediatric Nutrition, Abbott Laboratories, Ross Product Division, Similac Infant Formulas, 625 Cleveland Avenue, Columbus, OH 43215-1724, Telephone: (800) 721-5222 Secondary Telephone: (800) 986-8510 Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Guidelines, Infant development, Infants, Nutrition, Parents

Kibbe D, Offner R. 2003. Childhood obesity: Advancing effective prevention and treatment—An overview for health professionals. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Educational Foundation , 44 pp. (Issue paper)

Annotation: This issue paper for health professionals focuses on childhood obesity and provides an overview of prevalence and trends, health and economic impacts, and current treatment and prevention options. A resource list highlighting numerous health care, school, and community initiatives is provided along with statistical information in tables and graphs throughout the paper. References are provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Case studies, Child health, Children, Health promotion, Initiatives, Obesity, Prevention, Professional education

Perez-Escamilla R. 2003. Promoting healthy children and families in Connecticut: Part 2—Child nutrition. Farmington, CT: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 12 pp. (IMPACT: Ideas and information to promote the health of Connecticut's children; issue no. 4)

Annotation: This report discusses early childhood nutrition and complications of poor nutrition in infancy and childhood, and offers recommendations for increasing public understanding and policy changes for optimal nutritional health. The report describes optimal nutrition and feeding practices in infancy and childhood, the problem of childhood obesity, the role of iron in normal health and development and the prevention of iron deficiency anemia, and the implications of early feeding practices for the development of childhood dental problems. The report also offers specific recommendations based on knowledge in each of these areas. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. The report concludes with a list of references.

Contact: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 270 Farmington Avenue, Suite 367, Farmington, CT 06032, Telephone: (860) 679-1519 Fax: (860) 679-1521 E-mail: info@chdi.org Web Site: http://www.chdi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition, Connecticut, Early childhood development, Feeding, Infant feeding, Infant health, Infant nutrition, Infants, Iron, Iron deficiency anemia, Obesity, Oral health, State initiatives, Young Children

U.S. General Accounting Office. 2003. School lunch program: Efforts needed to improve nutrition and encourage healthy eating. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 36 pp.

Annotation: This report to Congressional requesters discusses the following questions: (1) What is known nationally about the extent to which schools and school food authorities are meeting United States Department of Agriculture nutrition requirements and promoting healthy eating among students?; (2) What barriers do schools and school food authorities face in serving nutritious food and encouraging students to make healthy eating choices?; and (3) what steps have schools and school food authorities taken to overcome the barriers to serving nutritious food and encouraging students to make healthy eating choices? The appendices include letters of comment from the Departments of Health and Human Services and Education.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-03-506.

Keywords: Food habits, National programs, Nutrition, Nutrition education, Program evaluation, School age children, School lunch programs

Lorenzo SB. 2002–. Overweight and obesity in children and adolescents: Knowledge path (4th ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This knowledge path is a guide to resources about the prevention, identification, management, and treatment of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents in homes, schools, and communities. It is aimed at health professionals, program administrators, policymakers, and researchers. Separate briefs list resources for families, schools, and child care and early education programs. The path is updated periodically. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bibliographies, Children, Electronic publications, Knowledge paths, Obesity

Story M, Holt K, Sofka D, Clark EM, eds. 2002. Bright Futures in practice: Nutrition—Pocket guide. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 84 pp.

Annotation: This book provides a thorough overview of nutrition supervision during infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence. It includes four sections, which are (1) the introduction, (2) nutrition supervision guidelines, (3) nutrition issues and concerns, and (4) nutrition tools. The introduction provides information about the role of nutrition and physical activity in promoting a healthy lifestyle and the role cultural and ethnic factors may play in nutrition choices. The nutrition supervision guidelines section is divided into chapters by age group, each of which includes an overview of the developmental period as well as critical nutrition issues for the age group. Nutrition Issues and Concerns discusses problems that cross age groups. Nutrition Tools provides screening tools, strategies, and resources to help promote good nutrition. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Bright Futures at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1242, Telephone: (202) 784-9772 E-mail: brightfutures@ncemch.org Web Site: http://www.brightfutures.org/georgetown.html Available from the website. Document Number: BF0900-006; HRSA Info. Ctr. MCH00101; ISBN1-57285-074-4.

Keywords: Adolescent nutrition, Bright Futures, Child nutrition, Cultural factors, Ethnic factors, Guidelines, Health promotion, Infant nutrition, Nutrition, Nutrition attitudes, Nutritional requirements, Physical activity

Story M, Holt K, Sofka D, eds. 2002. Bright Futures in practice: Nutrition (2nd ed.). Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 292 pp.

Annotation: This book provides a thorough overview of nutrition supervision during infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence. It includes four sections, which are (1) the introduction, (2) nutrition supervision guidelines, (3) nutrition issues and concerns, and (4) nutrition tools. The introduction provides information about the role of healthy eating and physical activity, nutrition in the community, and cultural awareness in nutrition services. The nutrition supervision guidelines section is divided into chapters by age group, each of which includes an overview of the developmental period as well as critical nutrition issues for the age group. Nutrition Issues and Concerns discusses problems that cross age groups. Nutrition Tools provides screening tools, strategies, and resources to help promote good nutrition. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Bright Futures at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1242, Telephone: (202) 784-9772 E-mail: brightfutures@ncemch.org Web Site: http://www.brightfutures.org/georgetown.html Available from the website. Document Number: BF0902-005; ISBN1-57285-071-X.

Keywords: Adolescent nutrition, Bright Futures, Child nutrition, Cultural factors, Ethnic factors, Guidelines, Health promotion, Infant feeding, Infant nutrition, Nutrition, Nutrition attitudes, Nutritional requirements, Physical activity

American Academy of Pediatrics. [Healthy active living for families] HALF implementation guide. Elk Grove, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics,

Annotation: This website provides information and resources from an initiative to develop and test a series of positive, family-focused messages specific to obesity prevention and care for the following developmental stages: infancy, toddlerhood, and early childhood. Contents include a quick start guide to products and resources for physicians and parents including Spanish language resources; age-specific content on food and feeding, physical activity, and parenting; interactive tools (widgets); data on obesity in children and opportunities for health professionals to partner with parents to address the problem; and techniques for communicating about and engaging families in healthy active living.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Disease prevention, Infants, Multimedia, Obesity, Parenting, Pediatric care, Physical activity, Spanish language materials, Toddlers, Young children

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.