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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenting Bibliography

Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenting

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 17 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published in the last ten years that focus on adolescent prenatal care. Included are publications for pregnant adolescents as well as those for health professionals.

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 17 records.

Fordham Interdisciplinary Parent Representation Project. [2012]. Guide to working with young parents in out of home care. New York, NY: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 50 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information and guidance for working with pregnant and parenting youth, helping them as they develop both as individuals and as parents through positive casework interactions. The guide encourages a strengths-based approach to ensure the safety of both young parents and their children. It offers suggestions for engaging young parents in conferencing and supportive services while highlighting the importance of maintaining a young parent’s right to privacy and autonomy, and emphasize comprehensive planning for pregnant young people to promote well being, to minimize the need for court intervention, to ensure placement stability and to help young families move more quickly toward permanency. The guide is designed to be used primarily by provider agency case planners, but may also be useful to child protective staff, Family Services Unit staff, parent advocates, attorneys and others who work with this vulnerable population. Topics in planning and services for young parents in out of home care include: legal issues, father participation, collaborative planning and permanency, preventive services, child safety conferences, court intervention, pregnancy-related services, medical home visiting programs, parenting supports, counseling and mental health services, education, child care, and preparing a young parent for leaving foster care. Appendices provide resources for services in adolescent reproductive health, breastfeeding, the WIC program, support services and assistance, teen father support, mentoring and mental health, housing support, legal information, education, hoe visiting, and parenting education programs. Tips sheets are provided on mandatory reporting, early care and education, public housing, and transitional Medicaid.

Contact: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 150 William Street, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 341-0900 Secondary Telephone: (877) KIDSNYC E-mail: http://nyc.gov/html/mail/html/mailacs.html Web Site: http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Child welfare, Family support services, Foster care, New York, Out of home care, Parent education, Social services, State initiatives, Youth in transition programs

Langford BH, Greenblatt SB. [2012]. Investment matters: Investing in supports for pregnant and parenting adolescents and young adults in or transitioning from foster care. Chicago, IL: Youth Transition Funders Group, Foster Care Work Group, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights considerations, challenges, and opportunities for foundations in investing in supports for pregnant and parenting adolescents and young adults—both mothers and fathers—currently in or transitioning from foster care. Topics include early sexual behavior, pregnancy, and rates of childbearing and parenthood among young people in foster care, risk factors, and challenging outcomes. Additional challenges such as lack of national data on specific needs and challenges, lack of practice models, need for workforce training, how to best identify and support adolescent fathers, and limited application of developmentally appropriate service delivery and planning with those that remain in foster care through age 21 are discussed. Investment opportunities in research and data collection, pregnancy prevention strategies, state supports for young parents and their children, and extending eligibility and re-entry are outlined.

Contact: Youth Transitions Funders Group, 207 East Ohio Street, #392, Chicago, IL 60611, E-mail: info@ytfg.org Web Site: http://www.ytfg.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Family support programs, Foster care, Parent support services, Transition to independent living, Young adults

Egan J, Kaufmann LS. 2012. A pregnancy test for schools: The impact of education laws on pregnant and parenting students. Washington, DC: National Women's Law Center, 36 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines the ways that federal, state, and local policies and programs can improve outcomes for pregnant and parenting students and ranks how well state education laws and policies address the needs of these students. The report describes the challenges faced by pregnant and parenting students, highlights the requirements of federal laws, reviews relevant state laws and policies (examples from different states are provided throughout), and concludes with recommendations for schools and policymakers. The report also serves as a guide to advocates and service providers who work with pregnant and parenting students, and includes a toolkit designed to help them promote legal reform, implementation, and enforcement in their own communities.

Contact: National Women's Law Center, 11 Dupont Circle. N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 588-5180 Fax: (202) 588-5185 E-mail: info@nwlc.org Web Site: http://www.nwlc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Education, Parents, Policy, Pregnant adolescents, Pregnant women, School health services, State legislation, State programs, Students

Guttmacher Institute. 2012. Minors' access to prenatal care. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 3 pp. (State policies in brief)

Annotation: This brief summarizes policies on minors' access to prenatal care in states across the country. It describes how these policies have changed over the past 30 years and highlights the differences in state laws regarding a minor's ability to access prenatal care. A chart indicates which states have explicit policies; whether or not parental consent is required for treatment; and whether or not physicians are allowed to inform parents when providing prenatal care to minors.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Confidentiality, Parental consent, Policy, Prenatal care, State legislation

New York City Administration for Children's Services. 2012. ABCs of working with young parents in out of home care: Expectations, responsibilities and resources. New York, NY: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document is a source of information and guidance for case planners in New York City in their work with parenting youth and youth planning for the arrival of their baby in foster care, and in developing appropriate service plans for these youth. It discusses roles for agency case planners in referring both expecting mothers and fathers of health and support systems, discussing the role of resource parents for minors who are expecting, securing a stable placement for expecting youth before baby arrives, as well as developing and executing permanency plans for young parents in out-of-home care. Additional information is provided on health care testing and decision-making, legal aspects of pregnancy and parenting, and understanding funding for baby's essential needs. A practice guide summary is included along with resources for community based services, housing and child care, child welfare services, medical mentoring for pregnant and parenting youth, and prevention services.

Contact: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 150 William Street, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 341-0900 Secondary Telephone: (877) KIDSNYC E-mail: http://nyc.gov/html/mail/html/mailacs.html Web Site: http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Child welfare, Family support services, Foster care, New York, Out of home care, Parent education, Social services, State initiatives, Youth in transition programs

Healthy Teen Network. [2011]. Mapping programs that serve pregnant and parenting teens in the U.S.: Results and hurdles. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 5 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Healthy Teen Network's efforts to create a directory of all of the programs serving pregnant and parenting teens in the United States. The report describes the method used to identify and survey individual programs and discusses the results of the search, which varied greatly from state to state, depending on how much information the states were able to provide. The report concludes with a list of recommendations to help eliminate the challenges encountered in identifying programs and services.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Directories, National surveys, State programs

Desiderio G, Max J, Scott ME, Ikramulah E, Barry M, Manlove J. [2010]. Bricks, mortar, and community: The foundations of supportive housing for pregnant and parenting teens. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network; Washington, DC: Child Trends, 2 v.

Annotation: This two-volume report identifies a set of core components for supportive housing programs serving pregnant and parenting adolescents and identifies case studies of programs that meet these standards. The first volume, Core Components of Supportive Housing, lists and discusses five core components. Examples of supporting housing programs that integrate the core components are also presented. The second volume, Findings from the Field, provides findings related to program demographics for programs serving pregnant and parenting adolescents as well as findings related to program services. Both volumes discuss strategic approaches for identifying the core components, provide background on pregnant and parenting adolescents, and define key terms used.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Case studies, Housing, Housing programs, Pregnant adolescents, Programs

[2009]. Helping pregnant and parenting teens find adequate housing. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network; American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document provides an overview of housing-related legal and policy issues with which advocates for young families should be familiar. it lists programs that assist with finding and paying for housing (Section 8, Family Unification Program, Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-housing Program) and programs that provide housing (maternity group homes, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, transitional housing, extended support for foster youth. It discusses whether minors can enter into valid leases for housing, what emancipation is and how youth can become emancipated, and what individuals can do to help pregnant and parenting teens find housing. Numerous legislation is cited.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Family support services, Housing, Pregnant adolescents

Ajayi , Ablorth-Odjidja A, Cox E, Phillips C, Toby T. 2009. Meeting the needs of pregnant and parenting teens: Local health department programs and services. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 18 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the importance of addressing the needs of pregnant and parenting adolescents in order to improve their heath and life outcomes and those of their children. The report highlights four local health departments that are implementing promising approaches to providing services for these adolescents and are working to prevent the negative consequences often associated with adolescent childbearing and parenting. Recommendations are provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Child health, Health agencies, Local initiatives, Prevention

Dworsky A, DeCoursey J. 2009. Pregnant and parenting foster youth: Their needs, their experiences. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall, 43 pp.

Annotation: This monograph analyzes administrative data from an organization serving pregnant and parenting foster youth in the Chicago metropolitan area and surrounding counties. It quantitatively describes the characteristics of the pregnant and parenting foster youth problem in the Chicago area: placement histories, pregnancies and outcomes, receipt of prenatal care, education, and children of foster youth. Qualitative descriptions derived from interviews with organization leaders describe challenges in engaging youth with services, pregnancy prevention, services for pregnant foster youth, services for parenting foster youth and their children, placement-related concerns, education, and preparing foster youth for exiting care. Implications for policy and practice conclude the report.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Foster care, Foster children, Illinois, Pregnant adolescents, Statistics, Youth services

Healthy Teen Network. 2009. A policy platform to promote health and success among young families. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 35 pp.

Annotation: This report constitutes a set of federal policy recommendations aimed at establishing or reforming programs and systems that influence whether young families may achieve health and success after a birth to adolescent parents. The report discusses young families' needs and gaps in resources and services according to the following seven life domains: (1) health and human services, (2) housing, (3) education, (4) work force and life skills development, (5) child welfare and development, (6) income security, and (7) knowledge development and transfer.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Adolescent development, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Child development, Child health, Education, Families, Family income, Health services delivery, Housing, Programs, Public policy, Services, Work force

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2009. Science says: Socio-economic and family characteristics of teen childbearing . Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 3 pp. (Putting what works to work; no. 41)

Annotation: This fact sheet presents new findings on the socioeconomic and family characteristics of adolescents who give birth to or father a child and examines commonly held beliefs about this population among American adults. The findings are based on 2009 public opinion polling data and an analysis conducted by Child Trends using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), a nationally representative longitudinal survey of students. Included are statistics on the family structure and the family income of adolescents who had reported ever giving birth.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Data analysis, Longitudinal studies, Sampling studies, Socioeconomic factors

Bales SN, O'Neil M. 2008. Gaining support for teen families: Mapping the perceptual hurdles—A report from the FrameWorks Institute to Healthy Teen Network. Washington, DC: FrameWorks, 50 pp. (A Frameworks research report)

Annotation: This report analyzes the dominant modes of thinking on adolescent parenting as found in the media and in the materials of advocaty organizations. It offers reasons and ways to change certain dominant modes of thinking, and it makes suggestions for further research regarding adolescent parenting.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Advertising, Advocacy groups, Information dissemination, Mass media, Youth

Llewelyn L, Herrndorf A, Curtis M. 2007. The Adolescent Family Life Program: Program overview and profile of clients. [Sacramento, CA]: Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health, California Department of Human Services, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the Adolescent Family Life Program (AFLP), a California program that strives to (1) promote the health and well-being of pregnant and parenting adolescents and their infants by maximizing the use of existing services and (2) save public funds by preventing the problems associated with preterm births and low birthweight and by reducing long-term welfare dependency resulting from school failure and dropouts. The report, which includes an executive summary, provides client stores, a program history and description, data sources and methodology, information about providers and funding, a profile of female clients, process and outcome indicators, and a conclusion. The report includes one appendix: list of AFLP agenices.

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, MS 8305, P.O. Box 997420, Sacramento, CA 95899-7420, Telephone: (866) 241-0395 Fax: (916) 650-0305 E-mail: mchinet@cdph.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/MCAH/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent parents, California, Costs, Families, Financing, Health services delivery, Infant health, Low birthweight, Low income groups, Pregnant adolescents, Preterm birth, School dropouts, School failure, State programs

National Women's Law Center. 2007. How to keep pregnant and parenting students from dropping out: A primer for schools. Washington, DC: National Women's Law Center, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes school responsibilities under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 for pregnant and parenting students related to access to school, extracurricular activities, absences, and specialized support.

Contact: National Women's Law Center, 11 Dupont Circle. N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 588-5180 Fax: (202) 588-5185 E-mail: info@nwlc.org Web Site: http://www.nwlc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Federal legislation, Pregnant adolescents, School attendance, School dropouts, School role

Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services, Division of Health Care Financing. 2006. Healthy teeth for mom and me: Oral health provider training. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services, Division of Health Care Financing,

Annotation: These program materials are designed for use in providing on-site training to health professionals in promoting maternal oral health and preventing early childhood caries. Topics include conducting oral health risk assessments to identify individuals in need of preventive or restorative oral health services, making referrals, educating pregnant adolescents on the importance of good oral health, linking maternal oral health to birth outcomes, and applying fluoride varnish, if indicated. Contents include a letter to health professionals; background information on early-childhood-caries prevention in health systems; outcome objectives; presentation slides; risk assessment, anticipatory guidance, and fluoride varnish manuals; sample oral-health-education materials; a list of resources; and selected articles. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Division of Health Care Access and Accountability, One West Wilson Street, Madison, WI 53703, Telephone: (608) 266-1865 Web Site: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/dhcaa/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Early childhood caries, Fluorides, Health promotion, Infants, Maternal health, Oral health, Patient education materials, Pregnant adolescents, Resources for professionals, Training materials, Wisconsin

Hulsey LK, Wood RG, Rangarajan A. 2005. The implementation of maternity group home programs: Serving pregnant and parenting teens in a residential setting. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica, 96 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the implementation of maternity group home programs for pregnant adolescents and adolescent parents in 22 different homes in seven sites in seven different states. In particular, the report addresses research questions about (1) organization, management, funding, and target population, (2) services provided, and (3) staffing and costs. How to implement lessons learned is also discussed, and recommendations for further research are included. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. The appendix provides data on each of the seven study sites. References are included.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Community programs, Costs, Group homes, MCH research, Pregnant adolescents, Services

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.