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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Bibliography

Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 71 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog. This bibliography includes selected materials published in the last ten years that focus specifically on adolescent pregnancy prevention. Materials on abstinence-only education and sexuality education are covered in separate bibliographies.

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 71 records.

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 2014, 2008. Ten tips for parents to help their children avoid teen pregnancy [rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 28 pp.

Annotation: This brochure provides parents, and other caregivers with information about how they can play a role in helping to reduce their adolescent child's risk for becoming pregnant. The brochure is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Parent education, Parent participation, Pregnant adolescents, Prevention, Spanish language materials

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health and Family and Youth Services Bureau. 2014-. Teen pregnancy prevention evidence review. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1 v.

Annotation: This website provides information and resources from an ongoing independent systematic review of the adolescent pregnancy prevention research to identify programs with evidence of effectiveness in reducing adolescent pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, and associated sexual risk behaviors. The website includes information on study quality and program models that have demonstrated positive impacts on sexual risk behavior and sexual health outcomes. Contents include a searchable database of studies included in the review, information about the review process and how the review is conducted, publications written by the review team, answers to frequently asked questions, and contact information for the study team.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Health behavior, Literature reviews, Prevention programs, Program models, Research methodology, Risk factors, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

Antonishak J, Finley C, Suellentrop K. 2014. Implementing an evidence-based pregnancy prevention program for youth in out-of-home care: Lessons learned from five implementing agencies. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report offers guidance and promising practices for implementing the adapted Making Proud Choices (MPCs) curriculum for youth in out-of-home care. Contents include lessons learned from implementation of the program in the following five geographically- and organizationally-diverse teams: Alameda County (California), Hawaii, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Rhode Island. Topics include creating partnerships, identifying gaps and special needs, measuring fidelity, and sustainability.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, California, Hawaii, Measures, Minnesota, Model programs, North Carolina, Prevention programs, Public private partnerships, Residential care, Rhode Island, Sustainability

Astone N, Martin S, Breslav L. 2014. Innovations in NYC health and human services policy: Teen pregnancy prevention. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 9 pp.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support. 2014. Bronx Teens Connections' Clinic Linkage Model: Connecting young people with clinical sexual and reproductive health services. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support, 2 pp. (Public health practice stories from the field)

Annotation: This document describes the Bronx Teens Connection (BxTC) program of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, a multicomponent initiative to reduce pregnancy rates among adolescent and young adult females ages 15-19. Contents include information on program activities, accomplishments, and lessons learned. Topics include establishing formal linkages between clinics and schools or youth-serving organizations, connecting youth to high-quality clinical sexual health services.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop E-70, Atlanta, GA 30341, E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/stltpublichealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Clinics, Health services delivery, Local MCH programs, Model programs, Prevention programs, Reproductive health, School linked programs, Sexual health, Urban population

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Teen pregnancy prevention: Resources for families (upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief presents resources about health care for teens and websites for parents, caregivers, and teens about teen pregnancy prevention. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Bibliographies, Contraception, Electronic publications, Families, Pregnant adolescents, Prevention, Sexuality education, Unplanned pregnancy

Solomon-Fears C. 2014. Teenage pregnancy prevention: Statistics and programs. Washington, DC: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service, 25 pp.

Annotation: This report provides statistics on teen pregnancy and births in the United States from 1950-2012, together with information on federal strategies and programs to reduce teen pregnancies. It reviews trends at both the state and national levels; discusses the financial and social costs of teen births; and discusses reasons for the fluctuation in adolescent birth rates over time. The report also describes federal strategies to reduce teen pregnancy during FY1998-FY2014 and includes descriptions of current federal pregnancy prevention programs. In conclusion, the report discusses evidence-based models based on evaluations of teen pregnancy prevention programs

Contact: Federation of American Scientists, 1725 DeSales Street, NW, Suite 600, Washington , DC 20036-4413, Telephone: (202) 546-3300 E-mail: fas@fas.org Web Site: http://www.fas.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Birth rates, Federal programs, Model programs, Pregnancy prevention, Reports, Statistics, Trends

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013. Reducing teen pregnancy in the United States. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 video (60 min.). (Public health grand rounds)

Annotation: This webcast focuses on reducing adolescent pregnancy in the United States. The speakers discuss ramifications of adolescent pregnancy and ways of preventing it and the roles of public health programs, parents, and health professionals in the effort. Progress in reducing adolescent pregnancy rates worldwide as well as the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention's efforts are discussed. The speakers also provide statistics related to adolescent pregnancy in the United States.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Communication, Contraception, Costs, Education, High risk adolescents, Low income groups, Parent child relations, Prevention, Programs, Public health, Statistical data

Colman S, Dee TS, Joyce TJ. 2013. Do parental involvement laws deter risky teen sex?. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 43 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 18810)

Annotation: This paper addresses the question of whether laws requiring that physicians notify or obtain consent from a parent of a minor seeking an abortion before performing the procedure deter risky adolescent sexual behavior. Drawing on multiple data sources, the paper seeks to reconcile the disparate findings in the existing literature and to provide new and comprehensive evidence on the association between parental involvement (PI) laws and rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in adolescents. Topics include abortion access and risky sexual activity among adolescents, data and samples, methods, and estimated impacts of PI laws on STIs.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Access to health care, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Consent, Health services, Parents, Legislation, Prevention, Risk taking, Sexually transmitted diseases, Statistical data

Dreisbach N. 2013. Teen pregnancy: A winnable battle within reach. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 3 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This brief discusses the role of government and philanthropic funding in decreasing adolescent pregnancy and birth rates across communities in the United States. Remaining challenges are also discussed.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Government role, Philanthropy, Pregnant adolescents, Prevention

Dworsky A, Napolitano L, Barisik E, Reddy S, Simon M. 2013. The Demoiselle-2-Femme (D2F) pregnancy prevention program evaluation: Findings from the first baseline survey. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a baseline survey completed by 241 girls, primarily African American, in grade 9 through 11 who are participating in a federally funded evaluation of the Demoiselle-2-Femme signature after-school program in Chicago, Illinois. The purpose of the evaluation is to estimate the effects of program participation on a number of key behavioral outcomes, including sexual activity, unprotected sex, and adolescent pregnancy. The report presents background; describes the program; and discusses study design and methods; student characteristics; relationships with adults; attitudes, feelings, and knowledge about sexual behavior; sexual behavior and prior pregnancy; dating violence; tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use; and educational expectations.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent females, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Alcohol consumption behavior, Blacks, Community programs, Dating, Educational attainment, Illinois, Interpersonal violence, Marijuana, Prevention, Relationships, Smoking, Substance abuse

Guzman L, Caal S, Hickman S, Golub E, Ramos M. 2013. When sex and dating are the same: Latinos' attitudes on teen parenthood and contraception. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 7 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief reports on what Child Trends learned through focus groups and interviews with Latino teens and parents about their values, ideals, and attitudes about teen parenthood, teen dating and sex, and the use of birth control by teens. It discusses the potential implications of these values, ideals, and attitudes for teen pregnancy prevention programs.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Behavior, Hispanic Americans, Interviews, Prevention, Research

Leonard S, Fantroy JD, Lafferty K. 2013. Help me to succeed: A guide for supporting youth in foster care to prevent teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy; Atlanta, GA: Georgia Campaign for Adolescent Power and Potential, 15 pp.

Annotation: This guide combines messages directly from youth in foster care in Georgia with national research to provide insight and advice to adults working in the child welfare sector. It outlines how understanding a young person's feelings and opinions regarding the risks of early pregnancy and prevention strategies can help child welfare professionals provide more effective support.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Foster care, Georgia, Prevention programs, State programs, Unplanned pregnancy, Welfare services

Moore KA, Manlove J, Walker K, Guzman L. 2013. Reducing teen childbearing among Latinos: An innovative anti-poverty strategy. [Bethesda, MD]: Child Trends, 131 pp.

Annotation: This report identifies promising approaches to reducing early childbearing among Latino adolescents based on evidence from research studies, trend data, evaluations of intervention programs, and interviews with parents, teens, and program designers and practitioners. The findings from each of these endeavors are described in individual chapters, which also present comparative statistics and discussions of key findings related to sexual activity, attitudes and beliefs, contraceptive use, and trends in reproductive outcomes among Hispanic adolescents. The report synthesizes the study findings and recommends strategies to reduce teen pregnancy and decrease poverty rates in Latino communities.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Data, Hispanic Americans, Intervention, Models, Poverty, Prevention, Research

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2013. Contraception calling: Why aren't more young women listening?. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 15 pp.

Annotation: This paper discusses a 2013 nationally representative survey of adolescents and young adults about what women think about contraception. Topics include pregnancy intention versus behavior, what method of contraception single women use, contraception concerns, how their choice of method was made, and what contraception methods young women want.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Contraception, Contraceptive agents, Contraceptive devices, Contraceptive use, Family planning, Surveys, Women's health, Young women

Shapiro R. 2013. Balancing fidelity and flexibility: Implementing the Gen.M Program in Texas—Final report. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 66 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from an evaluation of the Gender Matters (Gen.M) sex education program implemented in Travis County, Texas to help reduce the rate of teen pregnancy. The report describes the program’s design, facilitators’ training and delivery of the program, and youth engagement and understanding of the material after the first year of implementation. It concludes with lessons learned that could improve future Gen M. program outcomes.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Community programs, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Sexuality education, State programs, Texas

Zief S, Shapiro R, Strong D. 2013. The Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP): Launching a nationwide adolescent pregnancy prevention program. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, ca. 90 pp.

Annotation: This report documents states' program decisions in designing a Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) to help prevent adolescent pregnancy as part of the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Drawing on data collected through telephone interviews with state grantee officials in 44 states and the District of Columbia, the report analyzes program decisions based on the four primary expectations that the grant-funded programs be evidence-based; provide education on both abstinence and contraceptive use; and educate youth on at least three of six adulthood preparation topics. States were also encouraged to target high-risk populations. The report presents key findings from the data, state-by-state profiles, and spotlights on programs in Oklahoma and Tennessee. Design and implementation study methods and program models are included in the appendices.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website. Document Number: OPRE Report 2013-37.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Evaluation, Federal programs, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Prevention programs, State programs

John Snow, Inc. 2012. Engaging your community: A toolkit for partnership, collaboration, and action. Boston, MA: John Snow, Inc., 81 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is intended to assist organizations in the adolescent pregnancy prevention and parenting field with cultivating strategic partnerships, implementing innovative outreach strategies, and developing robust communications that target the diverse organizations and populations in their communities. For each topic it provides tools, resources, and a case study.

Contact: John Snow, Inc., 44 Farnsworth Street, Boston, MA 02210-1211, Telephone: (617) 482-9485 Fax: (617) 482-0617 E-mail: jsinfo@jsi.com Web Site: http://www.jsi.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Case studies, Collaboration, Communication, Local programs, Outreach, Public private partnerships

New York University Silver School of Social Work, Center for Latino Adolescent and Family Health. 2011 ca.. Families talking together. New York, NY: New York University Silver School of Social Work, Center for Latino Adolescent and Family Health, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are intended to help adolescents, parents, and community health workers engage in discussions about adolescent sexual and reproductive health. The content is drawn from the evidence-based parent intervention, Families Talking Together, to prevent and reduce risky sexual behavior among Latino adolescents. Materials for parents contain information on preventing too-early sex, how to talk with adolescents, and effective monitoring and supervision. Materials for adolescents address birth control and protection and relationships. The curriculum and accompanying fidelity checklist are designed to enhance the knowledge and skills of community health workers in effectively implementing the intervention. Additional materials such as the training schedule and fact sheet are also available. The content is available in English. A Latino Spanish and African American version are also available.

Contact: Center for Latino Adolescent and Family Health, New York University Silver School of Social Work, 15 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003, Telephone: (212) 992-6790 Fax: (212) 995-4605 E-mail: clafh@nyu.edu Web Site: http://www.clafh.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Blacks, Community health workers, Curricula, Ethnic groups, Families, Health promotion, Hispanic Americans, Minority groups, Parenting, Prevention programs, Reproductive health, Spanish language materials

Kirby D, Coyle K, Alton F, Rolleri L, Robin L. 2011. Reducing adolescent sexual risk: A theoretical guide for developing and adapting curriculum-based programs. Scotts Valley, CA: ETR Associates, 149 pp.

Annotation: This book is designed to help reproductive health professionals, educators, and others design, adapt, and select curricula that focus on risk and protective factors related to sexual risk behavior while using instructional principles most likely to improve health outcomes. The book is structured around risk and protective factors most likely to be changed by a curriculum­based program. Each chapter focuses on a different risk or protective factor, summarizing the available evidence showing how the factor affects sexual behavior and discussing relevant behavior change theory and instructional principles for improving the factor. The book describes how to create logic models and learning objectives, how to increase knowledge. improve perceptions of risk, address attitudes, values, and beliefs, and increase parent-child communication about sex. The examples in this book come from activities used primarily with middle or high school­aged youth.

Contact: ETR Associates, 4 Carbonero Way, Scotts Valley, CA 95066-4200, Telephone: (831) 438-4060 Secondary Telephone: (800) 321-4407 Fax: (800) 435-8433 E-mail: customerservic@eta.org Web Site: http://www.etr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Curricula, Curriculum development, Prevention, Risk factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Sexuality education

Manlove J, Welti K, McCoy-Roth M, Berger A, Malm K. 2011. Teen parents in foster care: Risk factors and outcomes for teens and their children. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 9 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This report reviews the existing research literature on adolescents in foster care to assess the extent to which adolescents in foster care are at risk of adolescent pregnancy and parenting. The report highlights the various risk factors and identifies the challenges faced in efforts to reduce rates of adolescent pregnancy and childbearing and to prevent negative outcomes among adolescent parents in foster care and their children.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Data analysis, Foster children, Research reviews, Risk factors

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Reproductive Health. 2011. Preventing teen pregnancy in the U.S.. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Reproductive Health, 4 pp. (CDC vital signs)

Annotation: This fact sheet about preventing and reducing adolescent pregnancy in the United States provides an introduction to the issue; presents the latest findings on adolescent pregnancy prevention; discusses who is at the highest risk; provides information about adolescent birthrates by state; explains what the government is doing to address the problem, what parents can do, and what adolescents can do; and provides code that allows users to place Centers for Disease Control and Prevention buttons to web pages.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Reproductive Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, High risk groups, Mass media, Parents, Prevention, Research

Suellentrop K. 2011. What works 2011-2012: Curriculum-based programs that help prevent teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 30 pp.

Annotation: This document provides a list of programs that have been evaluated and found to be successful in changing adolescent sexual behavior, including delaying sexual initiation, improving contraceptive use, and reducing adolescent pregnancy. For each program, the document lists selected program effects, contact information, and links to additional program and evaluation information. The document offers advice on how to choose a program, catalogs the characteristics of effective programs, and offers some words of caution about what an effective program actually can accomplish.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Prevention programs, Resources for professionals, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Brochures, Intervention, Program descriptions

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. [2010]. Talking back: Ten things teens want parents to know about teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 16 pp.

Annotation: This brochure, aimed at parents, lists ten important tips regarding what adolescents want parents to know about how to help them prevent adolescent pregnancy. Also included in this brochure are references for adolescent sexuality and communication-related resources.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Parent education, Prevention programs

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Reproductive Health. [2010]. Preventing teen pregnancy 2010-2015. [Atlanta, GA]: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Reproductive Health, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides an overview of teen pregnancy in the United States and discusses the importance of prevention due to the substantial social and economic costs and the impact on teen parents and children over time. The fact sheet provides statistics on pregnancy, birth, and abortion rates among young women for the years 1991-2008, and provides data on teen birth rates for by race and ethnicity for the period 2005-2008. The fact sheet also lists a set of protective factors typically addressed in evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Reproductive Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Data, Prevention, Prevention programs, Statistics, Trends

Fuentes L, Bayetti Flores V, Gonzalez-Rojas J. 2010. Removing stigma: Towards a complete understanding of young Latinas' sexual health. New York, NY: National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, 10 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews recent research on adolescent sexuality and reproductive health, sets forth a reproductive justice framework for advancing the sexual health of Latina adolescents, and describes policy approaches that make healthy decisions possible and rewarding, so Latinas and all women can have healthy adolescent years, avoid pregnancy and birth when they want to, and have healthy pregnancies and children when and if they choose to become mothers.

Contact: National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, 50 Broad Street, Suite 1825, New York, NY 10004, Telephone: (212) 422-2553 Fax: (212) 422-2556 E-mail: NLIRH@LatinaInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.latinainstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Female children, Hispanic Americans, Pregnancy prevention, Reproductive health, Sexual health, Young women

Tennessee District Attorneys General Conference. [2010. What's the rush?: Don't be a teen parent. [Nashville, TN]: Tennessee Department of Health, Tennessee Department of Human Services, Tennessee Department of Education,

Annotation: This website provides information about What's the Rush?, a statewide initiative of the Tennessee District Attorneys General Conference aimed at raising awareness of the legal, financial, and social consequences of becoming an adolescent parent. The website provides downloadable resources and a list of initiative partners.

Contact: Tennessee District Attorneys General Conference, 226 Capitol Boulevard, Suite 800, Nashville, TN 37243, Telephone: (615) 741-1696 Fax: (615) 741-7459 E-mail: contact@tndagc.org Web Site: http://www.tndagc.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Prevention, Resource materials, State initiatives, Tennessee

Healthy Teen Network. [2009]. Helping teens stay healthy and safe: Health care, contraception, and confidential services. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, (Fast facts)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information on the provision of confidential contraceptive services as an essential part of comprehensive health care and pregnancy prevention for adolescents. Contents include statistics; research findings; and information on professional organization policies and state and federal laws that help to ensure adolescents' access to contraceptive services and provide confidentiality protections. The fact sheet also provides information and tips for adolescent on rights and expectations, consenting to care, and confidentiality. Organizational resources and references are included.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Confidentiality, Consent, Contraception, Pregnancy, Preventive health services, Reproductive rights

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy with Pathways/Senderos Center. [2009]. Thinking about our future: Latino teens speak out about teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 12 pp.

Annotation: This pamphlet, which is geared toward Latino adolescents, is intended to provide insights into Latino adolescents' own views about sex, pregnancy, and related issues. The pamphlet includes statistics about adolescent pregnancy and parenthood among Latinos, discusses reasons to avoid sex and pregnancy from the points of views of male Latino adolescents and female Latino adolescents, and provides three personal stories told by Latino adolescents.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Consumer education materials, Contraception, Costs, Hispanic Americans, Personal narratives, Prevention

CityMatCH and National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2009. The impact of positive youth development programs on teen pregnancy prevention. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH; Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1 webcast (72 min.).

Annotation: This 72-minute webinar discusses PYD (Positive Youth Development) and evidenced-based programs that can impact teen pregnancy prevention, and features presentations by invited speakers from Healthy Teen Network, the Center for Disease Control's (CDC) Division of Adolescent Health and the Minnesota Organization on Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention and Parenting. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent pregnancy, Audiovisual materials, Models, Prevention programs

Healthy Teen Network. 2009. Issue in brief: Youth development and teen pregnancy, STI, and HIV prevention. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 10 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the need for youth development programs, the trends and impacts of pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections on youth development, aspects of effective youth development programs, and seven programs proven to reduce sexual risk taking behaviors.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Community programs, Model programs, Risk taking, Sexual behavior, Youth

Sabatiuk L, Flores R. 2009. Toward a common future: Latino teens and adults speak out about teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 32 pp.

Annotation: This pamphlet, which is geared toward Latino adolescents; presents perspectives on adolescent pregnancy and sexual activity in the voices of Latino adolescent males and females. Statistics about adolescent pregnancy and parenting are also provided.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent females, Adolescent males, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Consumer education materials, Contraception, Hispanic Americans, Prevention

Alford, S. 2008. Science and success, second edition: Sex education and other programs that work to prevent teen pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infections. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 112 pp.

Annotation: This document describes 26 programs found to be effective in reducing adolescent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, including those that are school-based, community-based, and clinic-based. It discusses the criteria for inclusion and major program effects.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, HIV, Model programs, Prevention, Programs, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Card JJ, Benner T. 2008. Model programs for adolescent sexual health: Evidence-based HIV, STI, and pregnancy prevention interventions. New York, NY: Springer, 394 pp.

Annotation: This book provides a directory of effective sexual education programs in the United States, all of which are aimed at a variety of age groups, and ethnic, cultural, and sexual orientations. Each program description contains the following: an abstract, program rationale and history, schedule, materials, a description of implementation steps, and an evaluation section. Sites of the programs include schools, community settings, and medical clinics.

Contact: Springer Publishing Company, 11 West 42nd Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10036, Telephone: (877) 687-7476 E-mail: contactus@springerpub.com Web Site: http://www.springerpub.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 978-082613824-8.

Keywords: Sexuality education, Adolescents, Cultural beliefs, Ethnic groups, Homosexuality, Model programs, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Sexual behavior, Sexually transmitted diseases

Healthy Teen Network. 2008. Preventing teen pregnancy among marginalized youth: Developing a policy, program, and research agenda for the future. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 19 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the discussion and consensus formed at a summit held on September 8, 2008 in which eight adolescent pregnancy experts convened to discuss prevention of adolescent pregnancy among marginalized youth. The report also describes the current state of the adolescent pregnancy field, explores new frameworks and theoretical underpinnings, and makes policy recommendations.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents with special health care needs, High risk adolescents

Kirby D. 2007. Emerging answers 2007: Research findings on programs to reduce teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 199 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes research results on sexual risk behavior and its consequences. It identifies the particular types of adolescent sexual risk-taking behavior that affect pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). It provides an overview of factors that influence sexual risk-taking and describes the programs and approaches that have reduced teen sexual risk-taking and pregnancy or STD. The closing chapters provide conclusions and advice on applying research results in communities. References are provided at the end of each chapter. Extensive tables throughout the report present research findings and program comparisons.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org $10.00, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 1-58671-070-2.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Community programs, Contraception, HIV, Pregnant adolescents, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Risk factors, Sexual behavior, Sexually transmitted diseases

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 2007. One in three: The case for wanted and welcomed pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the high rate of unwanted pregnancy among adolescents and young adults and the promotion of responsible behavior and policies that can help reduce unwanted pregnancy and the need for abortion in America. It discusses and promotes education about a range of topics on unwanted pregnancy among adolescents and young adults including work with leaders, policymakers, and program leaders at the national and state levels; the careful and consistent practice of family planning by all who are sexually active and not seeking pregnancy; the role of men in pregnancy prevention and planning; the engagement of entertainment media, faith communities, peers and others; and the support of practical, evidence-based policies. Statistical data are provided in charts and graphs throughout the report. Reference sources are provided along with a list of individuals on the National Campaign advisory groups.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Family life planning, Family planning, Family planning education, Prevention programs, Sexual behavior, Sexuality education, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy, Young adults

Bean S, Rolleri LA, Wilson P. 2006. Parent-child connectedness: New interventions for teen pregnancy prevention. Santa Cruz, CA: ETR Associates, 73 pp.

Annotation: This document presents activities that can provide community-based organizations with intervention resources they can use to impact parent-child connectedness (PCC) among the parents and adolescents with whom they work. The activities focus on the following topics: (1) parenting style and PCC, (2) understanding adolescent development, (3) responding to adolescents, (4) connectedness and the emotional bank account, (5) using positive reinforcement to increase connectedness, and (6) active listening to provide emotional support.

Contact: ETR Associates, 4 Carbonero Way, Scotts Valley, CA 95066-4200, Telephone: (831) 438-4060 Secondary Telephone: (800) 321-4407 Fax: (800) 435-8433 E-mail: customerservic@eta.org Web Site: http://www.etr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Emotional development, Family support, Intervention, Parent child relations, Parents, Training

CityMatCH. 2006. Evidenced-based approaches to teen pregnancy prevention. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH,

Annotation: This Webcast hosts presentations by three experts in the field of adolescent pregnancy and adolescent sexual risk taking behavior intervention. The first presenter speaks on promoting evidence or science based initiatives at the local level. She defines science based approaches and summarizes program designs and program evaluations. The second speaker overviews the work in Minnesota to promote science based approaches and details three examples of science based approaches to adolescent sexual health. The final speaker discusses adolescent sexual risk-taking intervention at the local level in Nevada including aspects of implementation, collaboration, sustainability and outcomes. Powerpoint presentations accompany the presentations. A question and answer session follows the presentations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Community programs, Multimedia, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Program evaluations, Risk taking, Sexual behavior

Troccoli K. 2006. Terms of engagement: How to involve parents in programs to prevent teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 30 pp.

Annotation: This publication summarizes discussion from two roundtables during which adolescent pregnancy prevention leaders, health department representatives, and others working with youth and families explored what is known about parental influence on adolescents' sexual decision-making, shared strategies for effectively involving parents in programs, and considered what more programs can do to address parents' needs in this area. The publication also provides additional information about what social science suggests about parental influence. The publication focuses on for common challenges that emerged for programs seeking to involve parents: (1) reaching parents, (2) motivating parents to participate and keeping them involved, (3) knowing what to say to parents and how to say it, and (4) paying for programs. The publication concludes with a summary of key points based on these challenges and strategies, as well as program descriptions and some tips from parents to help their children avoid early pregnancy and parenthood.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org $5.00, plus shipping and handling; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-58671-065-6.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Community programs, Families, Financing, Parent child relations, Parent participation, Parents, Pregnancy prevention

Vexler EJ, Sullentrop K. 2006. Bridging two worlds: How teen pregnancy prevention programs can better serve Latino youth. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 36 pp.

Annotation: This publication, which is intended for those involved in community programs that work directly with Hispanic youth, offers information that can help reduce adolescent pregnancy rates within the Hispanic community. The publication provides demographic data about the Hispanic community, an overview of pregnancy prevention programs shown to be effective with Hispanic youth, insights from program leaders in the field, and views of Hispanic adolescents themselves. Endnotes and a list of other materials of interest from the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy are included. The publication is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Community programs, Hispanic Americans, Prevention, Spanish language materials, Young adults

Whitehead BD, Pearson M. 2006. Making a love connection: Teen relationships, pregnancy, and marriage. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 31 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines steps toward the goal of developing strategies that provide adolescents with a positive vision and expectations for their lives and thus help prevent adolescent pregnancy. The steps outlined in the report include (1) teach adolescents about healthy relationships and healthy marriage; (2) teach adolescents about how to promote the achievement of their dreams and desires for their future family and work lives; (3) provide a knowledge base, practical skills, and social support to help adolescents successfully navigate the transition from adolescence to adulthood; and (4) engage parents as first teachers. The report is divided into the following main sections: (1) facing the cultural challenge (which deals with the differences in the world of adolescents today vs. the one in which their parents grew up); (2) confronting the knowledge deficit about relationships; (3) losing the connection between sex, marriage, and parenthood; and (4) what we need to do. Endnotes are included.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Families, Goals, Marriage, Parents, Prevention, Relationships

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. [2005]. Faith, hope, and love: How Latino faith communities can help prevent teen pregnancy. [Washington, DC]: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 12 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information about how faith leaders in Latin American communities can help prevent adolescent pregnancy. The guide discusses why faith leaders should get involved and describes ways they can help in these areas: (1) be a cultural bridge between parents and adolescents, (2) send a clear message to kids and to adults, (3) don't leave out fathers and sons, (4) help adolescents set goals and standards, (5) support and celebrate excellence and achievement, (6) be aware of adolescent culture, (7) be open to adolescent perspectives, (8) reach out to young people who are not at church, (9) give youth something to say "yes" to, and (10) enlist others. The guide is available on the web site in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Fathers, Hispanic Americans, Parents, Prevention, Religious organizations, Spanish language materials

Alan Guttmacher Institute. 2005. Sex education: Needs, programs, and policies. New York, NY: Alan Guttmacher Institute, 48 pp.

Annotation: This document, originally designed as a PowerPoint presentation, brings together research and analysis on sex education in the United States and its effectiveness in preventing unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among adolescents. The document includes background information about sexual activity among American adolescents, sex education policy and practice in public schools, the effectiveness of programs designed to delay sexual activity and to prevent unintended pregnancy and STDs among adolescents, and public opinion and public policies related to these topics.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Prevention programs, Public policy, Research, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Healthy Teen Network. 2005. Replicating success: One program at a time. Washington, DC: Healthy Teen Network, 18 pp.

Annotation: This publication focuses on the methodology that has been developed in recent years to replicate community-based programs that effectively address the complex issues associated with adolescent parents and adolescent pregnancy prevention in the United States. The publication showcases two programs in particular that have been successfully replicated in neighborhoods across the United States, Plain Talk and the Nurse-Family Partnership. The publication concludes with answers to frequently asked questions from community organizers who are interested in replicating an established program in their own communities and are prepared to take the next step. References and acknowledgments are included.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Community programs, Model programs, Prevention

Love LT, McIntosh J, Rosst M, Tertzakian K. 2005. Fostering hope: Preventing teen pregnancy among youth in foster care. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an overview of qualitative research with adolescents in foster care and with foster parents to learn more about their perspective on adolescent pregnancy. The report is divided into the following chapters: (1) what the research shows, (2) focus groups, (3) service provider survey, (4) key questions, implications, and recomendations, and (5) appendix: roundtable participants.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org $1.00; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-58671-058-3.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Focus groups, Foster care, Foster children, Foster parents, Research, Surveys

Albert B. 2004. Science says: American opinion on teen pregnancy and related issues 2003. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 4 pp. (Putting what works to work; no. 7)

Annotation: This brief summarizes some of the key findings from the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy's 2003 survey of adults and adolescents. The brief includes information from the survey on these topics related to adolescent pregnancy and sexuality: (1) parental influence, (2) adolescent attitudes and values, (3) abstinence and contraception; (4) "mixed messages, " (5) adolescents' desire for more information, (6) adolescents' estimates of the percentage of their peers who have had sex, (7) dating older partners, (8) adult supervision, (9) the message for boys, and (10) media influence. The brief also includes information about the Putting What Works to Work project, of which this brief is a part.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Contraception, Dating, Families, Mass media, Parent child relations, Parents, Supervision, Surveys

Alford S, Leon J, Sugland BW. 2004. Science-based practices: A guide for state teen pregnancy prevention organizations. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document provides an overview of science-based practices (SBP), including what they are, why they are important, and how they relate to the work of state adolescent pregnancy prevention organizations. it also addresses benefits and challenges to incorporating SBP into the mission and work of each organization and offers suggestions. References are provided.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Family planning, Pregnant adolescents, Prevention, Prevention programs, Program development, Program evaluation

Child Trends and National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 2004. Science says: Early childhood programs. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 6 pp. (Putting what works to work; no. 9)

Annotation: This research brief highlights three early childhood and elementary school programs that were evaluated and found to be associated with lower risk of pregnancy during adolescence. The brief lists criteria that programs must meet for inclusion in the report, discusses what research shows and what program studies show, and explains what it all means. The brief concludes with a list of endnotes.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Early childhood education, Early intervention programs, Elementary education, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Prevention, Research

Klerman LV. 2004. Another chance: Preventing additional births to teen mothers. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy and National Organization on Adolescent Pregnancy, Parenting, and Prevention, 49 pp.

Annotation: This report presents information about what is known about additional births to adolescent mothers. The primary focus of the report is its critical review and assessment of various prevention programs. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) the scope of the problem, (2) risk factors and consequences, (3) program evaluations, and (4) looking forward: recommendations and final thoughts. Each section includes references. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. The appendix presents the challenges of assessing evaluations of programs to prevent additional births to adolescent mothers.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Community programs, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Risk factors

Manlove J, Franzetta K, McKinney K, Papillo AR, Terry-Humen E. 2004. A good time: After school programs to reduce teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 60 pp.

Annotation: This report for program providers, policymakers, and funders provides descriptions of those after-school programs that have been shown through research to have a positive impact on adolescent sexual behavior, such as delaying the onset of sex, increasing the use of contraception, and decreasing adolescent pregnancy. Contents include program profiles and key themes that emerged from evaluations of these programs; an overview of three types of after-school programs: curriculum-based sex education programs, youth development programs, and service learning programs; information on the costs and availability of program curricula; and program evaluation literature from which communities can draw in making their decisions about what programs they might consider using. The report also describes two sex education programs that did not affect adolescent sexual behavior. The appendix includes a program profile grid offering an outline of services included in the after-school programs.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, After school programs, Case studies, Community programs, Contraception, High risk adolescents, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Service learning, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Manlove J, Franzetta K, McKinney K, Papillo AR, Terry-Humen E. 2004. No time to waste: Programs to reduce teen pregnancy among middle school-aged youth. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 60 pp. (Putting what works to work)

Annotation: Produced in partnership with Child Trends, No Time to Waste provides detailed descriptions of programs for middle school-age students in abstinence and sex education and in HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases that have been shown through careful research to have a positive impact on adolescent sexual behavior. The publication provides detailed descriptions of program curriculum, costs, and evaluation results. It also describes programs that did not change participants' behavior. No Time to Waste was developed as part of the ongoing Putting What Works to Work project.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Abstinence, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Community programs, Costs, HIV, Middle schools, Model programs, Prevention, Prevention programs, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Manlove J, Papillio AR, Ikramullah E. 2004. Not yet: Programs to delay first sex among teens. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 92 pp. (Putting what works to work)

Annotation: This report focuses on the effects of programs designed to delay first sex among adolescents. The report begins with a summary of research on the consequences of early sexual initiation. This section is followed by an overview of the types of programs described in the report, along with a list of key insights that emerged from evaluations of the programs. Finally, the report profiles 15 programs that were evaluated using experimental designs. The report includes one appendix: a program profile grid.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Community programs, Prevention programs, Research, Sexual behavior

Napp D. 2004. Preventing HIV, STD, and teen pregnancy in schools: Strengthening state health and education agency partnerships. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 25 pp.

Annotation: This report on the regional stakeholders' meeting, Preventing HIV, STD and Teen Pregnancy in Schools: Strengthening State Health and Education Agency Partnerships, held in July 2003, provides the following: (1) a summary of the processes used to plan and implement the meeting; (2) the proceedings of the meeting; and (3) a sample of the experiences shared by state participants to coordinate efforts to integrate HIV, STD, and adolescent pregnancy prevention in schools. Topics include (1) setting the stage, (2) creating a shared vision, (3) identifying our assets, (4) defining our challenges, (5) seeking solutions, (6) working with our national partners, (7) planning for action, (8) follow-up and evaluation, and (9) regional stakeholders meetings: state outcomes. Six appendices include shared vision statements, common challenges, state strategies, an action-planning worksheet, a follow-up conference call facilitator's guide, a technical assistance tracking form, and a sample matrix of state technical assistance needs.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Collaboration, Education, HIV, Prevention, Program coordination, Schools, Sexually transmitted diseases, State agencies, State health agencies, State programs, Technical assistance

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 2004. Teen pregnancy prevention: Dads make a difference. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 3 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses how parental influence can affect children's decisions about sex, love, and values. The fact sheet discusses what research says about parental influence, the media's role in influencing adolescents, adolescent boys, the role of fathers, and what parents can do.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Families, Fathers, Love, Mass media, Moral values, Parent child relations, Parents, Prevention, Research

Rogers J, Augustine J, Alford S. 2004. Integrating efforts to prevent HIV, other sexually transmitted infections, and pregnancy among teens. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 4 pp. (Issues at a glance)

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses the benefits and challenges of approaching adolescents holistically and of integrating the sexual health information and services they receive. The ract sheet discusses the following topics: (1) what is an integrated approach to promoting sexual health among adolescents? (2) is the situation of adolescents in the United States really serious enough to justify integrating health promotion efforts? (3) what are the benefits of integrating pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention efforts? and (4) how does an organization integrate its work to prevent pregnancy, HIV, and other STIs? References are included.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, HIV, Health promotion, Health services, Prevention, Service integration, Sexually transmitted diseases

Wertheimer R, Papillo AR. 2004. An update on state policy initiatives to reduce teen and adult nonmarital childbearing. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 7 pp. (Assessing the new federalism, series A, no. A-66)

Annotation: This report summarizes the findings of a 2001 survey of the 50 states conducted to learn how specific state policies and programs to discourage adolescent and adult nonmarital childbearing have changed since similar surveys were conducted in 1999 and 1997. The report also reviews trends in adolescent and adult nonmarital childbearing. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Childbirth, Prevention programs, Public policy, Single parents, State programs, State surveys, Surveys, Trends

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. [2003]. Parent power: What parents need to know and do to help prevent teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report for parents and other who work with young people compiles much of what is known about parental influence on their children and offers parents practical suggestions to help their children delay sexual activity and avoid adolescent pregnancy. Topics include insights from research, what adolescents want adults to know, and tips for parents. Also included are a reference list, a list of videotapes and publications, and a Web site for more information. The report is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Parent child relations, Parent education, Parenting skills, Prevention programs, Resource materials, Spanish language materials

Advocates for Youth. 2003-. The facts. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, multiple items.

Annotation: This series of fact sheets provides statistics, trends, program highlights, and additional resources and references on specific topics primarily related to adolescent health and sexuality both nationally and worldwide. Recent topics include adolescent pregnancy and childbearing; the sexual and reproductive health of youth globally; HIV and AIDS; sexually transmitted infections; abstinence and contraceptive use; abortion; gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth; demographic and socio-psychological factors in sexual behavior; and condom effectiveness.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health programs, Adolescent health services, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, HIV, School based clinics, Sexuality, Sexually transmitted diseases

Annie E. Casey Foundation. 2003. Walking the plain talk : A guide for trainers. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 136 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed for community-based organizations and policy makers interested in developing programs similar to Plain Talk, a neighborhood-based initiative aimed at helping adults, parents, and community leaders develop the skills and tools they need to communicate effectively with young people about reducing adolescent sexual risk-taking. It is a companion piece to the Plain Talk Starter Kit. This guide provides the following: (1) an overview of Plain Talk; (2) a description of the Plain Talk components (community mapping, walkers and talkers, and home health parties); (3) sample performance measures; and (4) a list of other resources. An appendix gives a set of Plain Talk survey forms for adults, adolescents, service sites, physicians, and sources for nonprescription contraceptives. A section of handouts includes sample pledge forms, fact sheets, self-evaluation tools, listening skills inventory, discussion and communications tips and scripts, and checklists.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Community participation, Community programs, Contraception, Local initiatives, Plain Talk program, Planning, Prevention programs, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Berglas N, Brindis C, Cohen J. 2003. Adolescent pregnancy and childbearing in California. Sacramento, CA: California Research Bureau, 56 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an overview of adolescent pregnancy and childbearing based on current research literature and focus groups with adolescents in California. The report addresses the following questions: (1) What are the current trends in adolescent sexual behavior, pregnancy, and childbearing in the United States? (2) What are the causes of adolescent sexual activity, pregnancy, and childbearing? (3) What are the consequences of adolescent childbearing for the mother, father, and infant? What are the economic costs to society? (4) What efforts have been made in California to address this issue? (5) What do California adolescents think about adolescent sexuality and pregnancy? Policy options involving the enhancement of family life education capacity of schools and families and other factors that influence adolescent decision-making are discussed. The report concludes with references. Statistical information is provided figures at the beginning of the report.

Contact: California Research Bureau, California State Library, 900 N Street, Suite 300, Sacramento, CA 94237-0001, Telephone: (916) 445-3551 Secondary Telephone: (916) 653-7843 Fax: (916) 654-5829 E-mail: crb@library.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.library.ca.gov/crb/index.html Available from the website. Document Number: CRB-03-007; ISBN 1-58703-176-0.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, California, Costs, Families, Fathers, Infants, Mothers, Prevention programs, Trends

Grisham C. 2003. Advice from the field: Youth employment programs and unintended pregnancy. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 25 pp.

Annotation: This report is intended to assist staff in the adolescent-employment field in integrating reproductive health education and unintended-pregnancy-prevention services into their programs. The report explores the connection between the fields of pregnancy prevention and adolescent employment. It provides advice from the field from five adolescent employment providers about their efforts to combat unintended pregnancy and to provide family planning services. In addition, it includes interviews with two experts in adolescent employment and adolescent pregnancy prevention.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent employment, Adolescent pregnancy, Community programs, Family planning, Health education, Pregnancy prevention, Reproductive health

Kirby D, Lezin N, Afriye RA, Gallucci G. 2003. Preventing teen pregnancy: Youth development and after-school programs. Scotts Valley, CA: ETR Publishing; New York, NY: YWCA of the U. S. A., 162 pp.

Annotation: This publication describes the planning, implementation, and diversification of a variety of youth development and after-school programs that may reduce the rates of adolescent pregnancy. Section topics include designing and implementing effective youth-development pregnancy-prevention programs; planning for education, jobs and careers; tutoring; entrepreneurship; arts and creative expression; service learning; mentoring; sports and fitness; substance abuse; curriculum-based sex education and HIV education programs; power in relationships: recognizing and preventing violence, assault and abuse; drop-in centers and group discussions as resources for youth at high risk of unprotected sex; involving parents in sexuality education; and the Children's Aid Society (CAS) Carerra model. The volume also includes two appendices that describe general characteristics of youth programs and communities believed to be important in preventing adolescent pregnancy. The volume concludes with a reference list.

Contact: ETR Associates, 4 Carbonero Way, Scotts Valley, CA 95066-4200, Telephone: (831) 438-4060 Secondary Telephone: (800) 321-4407 Fax: (800) 435-8433 E-mail: customerservic@eta.org Web Site: http://www.etr.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-56071-616-9.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent pregnancy prevention, After school programs, Empowerment, Parent participation, Program development, Self esteem, Service learning, Youth development

Leigh WA. 2003. Estimating the cost of effective teen pregnancy prevention programs. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 124 pp.

Annotation: This publication provides guidance for program operators and others who want to estimate the cost of serving a client in a teen pregnancy prevention program. The publication includes an executive summary, a background and literature review section that includes estimated costs for specific adolescent pregnancy prevention programs, a blank costing worksheet with instructions, a presentation and discussion of results from the worksheet's application to an actual program, and a discussion of lessons learned and conclusions. Some information is presented in tables grouped together at the end of the publication. The publication includes references.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Costs, Family planning programs, Literature reviews, Prevention programs

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 2003. Not just another single issue: Teen pregnancy and athletic involvement. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information on the ways in which girls' involvement in athletics can help prevent teen pregnancy. The fact sheet includes a general overview of the relationship between athletic involvement and pregnancy prevention and also offers a list of facts pertaining to this issue. The reverse side of the fact sheet provides endnotes.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Prevention, Sports

Nowak MW, Fishman ME, Farrell ME. 2003. State experience and perspectives on reducing out-of-wedlock births: Final report. Falls Church, VA: Lewin Group, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report examines state perspectives and experiences related to nonmarital birth policy since the passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act (PRWORA) of 1996. The report provides information on states' experiences related to the goal of reducing nonmarital births and the factors that helped shape state policies. The first part of the report provides a general overview of what is currently known about state efforts to reduce nonmarital births and the second part of the report provides detailed information about the experiences of a sample of nine states; Alabama, Arizona, Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, Pennsylvania, and Wyoming. Data are presented in graphs, charts, and tables throughout the report. The report provides a conclusion section and a list of references.

Contact: Lewin Group, 3130 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 800, Falls Church, VA 22042, Telephone: (703) 269-5500 Fax: (703) 269-5501 E-mail: lisa.chimento@lewin.com Web Site: http://www.lewin.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Premarital pregnancy, Single parents, State programs, Unplanned pregnancy

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 2001-2012. With one voice 20__: America's adults and teens sound off about teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, irregular.

Annotation: This report presents key findings from a national survey that asked adolescents and adults about a core set of questions about adolescent pregnancy and related issues. It offers information about factors that might influence adolescents' decisions about relationships, sex, contraception, and pregnancy as well as information for parents, program leaders, funders, and policymakers. The report describes the survey methodology, provides the specific wording of each survey question, and charts responses from adults and adolescents; comparable data from prior surveys are shown when available.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent behaviors, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Prevention programs, Public opinion, Statistics, Surveys

CityMatCH. Science-based approaches to preventing teen pregnancy . CityLights. 15(2):1-12. Summer 2006.,

Annotation: This issue of City Lights focuses on science-based approaches to preventing adolescent pregnancy. The issue includes articles on the public health challenge of addressing adolescent pregnancy and childbirth, the role of community helpers in solving the problem of unintended pregnancy, promoting science-based approaching to preventing adolescent pregnancy, sex and HIV education programs for adolescents, and promoting science-based approaching to preventing adolescent pregnancy in Massachusetts. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Adolescent pregnancy, Childbirth, Community role, Prevention, Public health, Sexuality education, Unwanted pregnancy

CityMatCH. Viewed through the lens: Urban MCH and the life course . CityLights. 17(1):1-12. Summer 2008.,

Annotation: This issue of City Lights focuses on urban maternal and child health and the life course. The issue discusses the life course model and perspectives and includes articles on adolescent pregnancy prevention in Pennsylvania, urban adolescent reproductive health disparities, science-based approach to adolescent pregnancy prevention (including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's approaches), and an overview and public health implications of autism spectrum disorders, [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Autism, Children, Ethnic factors, Families, Income factors, Infants, Life course, Pennsylvania, Prevention, Public health, Racial factors, Reproductive health, Urban populations, Women's health

Sociometrics Corporation. Program Archive on Sexuality, Health and Adolescence. Los Altos, CA: Sociometrics Corporation,

Annotation: The Program Archive on Sexuality, Health, and Education (PASHA) provides a set of replication kits of promising adolescent pregnancy prevention programs as well as programs related to prevention of HIV, AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. The programs are developed for use in schools, community organizations, and clinics. The web site describes the selection criteria, program package contents, ways to choose and use program packages, and currently available and forthcoming programs. The adolescent pregnancy programs cover both primary and secondary prevention.

Contact: Sociometrics Corporation, 170 State Street, Suite 260, Los Altos, CA 94022-2812, Telephone: (650) 949-3282 Secondary Telephone: (800) 846-3475 Fax: (650) 949-3299 E-mail: socio@socio.com Web Site: http://www.socio.com Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Abstinence, Adolescent pregnancy, Curricula, Educational materials, HIV, Prevention programs, Sexually transmitted diseases

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health . Evidence-based programs. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health,

Annotation: This database contains program models on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) List of Evidence-Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Models, a listing of programs with impacts on adolescent pregnancies or births, sexually transmitted infections, or sexual activity. The database can be searched by program name, program type, evaluation setting, intervention length, age, race and ethnicity, outcomes affected, and study rating. Background on the program review process, review protocols, lists of programs, and FAQs are also available.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2846 E-mail: oah.gov@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Databases, Federal initiatives, Model programs, Prevention programs, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.