Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Abstinence Education Bibliography

Abstinence Education

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 24 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog. It supplements the 1997 NCEMCH publication MCH Program Interchange: Focus on Abstinence Education. It covers materials focused on abstinence-only education. Materials on comprehensive sexuality education are listed in a companion bibliography.

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 24 records.

Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States. 2015. State profiles fiscal year 2014: A portrait of sexuality education and abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in the states. New York, NY: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States,

Annotation: These resources for advocates, educators, policymakers, public health professionals, parents, youth, and community stakeholders comprise profiles of sexuality education and abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in the United States. Topics include federal funding by state, total federal spending on abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, sexuality and HIV/STD education policies by state, and descriptions of evidence-based and comprehensive approaches to pregnancy-, STD-, HIV/AIDS-prevention and sexuality education programs.

Contact: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 90 John Street Suite 402, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 819-9770 Fax: (212) 819-9776 E-mail: siecus@siecus.org Web Site: http://www.siecus.org Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Abstinence, Federal MCH programs, Government financing, HIV, Model programs, Prevention programs, Sexual health, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases, State MCH programs

Guttmacher Institute. 2013. Sex and HIV education. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 5 pp. (State policies in brief)

Annotation: This brief summarizes state-level sex and HIV education policies, as well as specific content requirements, based on a review of state laws, regulations, and other legally binding policies. Topics include whether such education is mandated, parental involvement, contraception, marriage, negative outcomes, skills for healthy sexuality, and abstinence. Charts list requirements in each state.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence education, Contraception, Schools, Sexuality education, State legislation

National Abstinence Education Association. 2013. Abstinence works 2013: Sexual risk avoidance (SRA) abstinence education programs demonstrating improved teen outcome. Washington, DC: National Abstinence Education Association,

Annotation: This document provides a compendium of research on the effectiveness of sexual risk avoidance (SRA) abstinence education. It discusses understanding public health models that address sexual risk, federal funding of programs addressing sexual activity of adolescents, and using research to inform public policy. The majority of the document describes programs that are considered to have demonstrated improved teen outcomes and promising programs from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services abstinence education evaluation conferences held in 2005, 2007, and 2010.

Contact: National Abstinence Education Association, 1701 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20006, Telephone: (202) 248-5420 Web Site: http://www.thenaea.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence education, Model programs

Kim CC, Rector R. 2010. Evidence on the effectiveness of abstinence education: An update. Washington, DC: Heritage Foundation, 23 pp. (Backgrounder no. 2372)

Annotation: This paper discusses 22 studies of abstinence, including those primarily intended to teach abstinence and others on virginity pledges, and examines the extent to which the program had, or did not have, positive effects.

Contact: Heritage Foundation, 214 Massachusetts Avenue, N.E., Washington, DC 20002-4999, Telephone: (202) 546-4400 Fax: (202) 546-8328 E-mail: Info@heritage.org Web Site: http://www.heritage.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence education, Community programs, Program evaluation, Sexuality education

Olsho L, Cohen J, Walker DK, Johnson A, Locke G. 2009. National survey of adolescents and their parents: Attitudes and opinions about sex and abstinence—Final report. Cambridge, MA: Abt Associates, 195 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the methodology and findings from a study conducted to examine current attitudes of parents and adolescents about sex and abstinence. The study was guided by the following research questions: (1) What are adolescent and parent attitudes concerning sex and abstinence? (2) How are attitudes of parents and their adolescents similar to or different from each other? (3) Adjusting for all other variables, what factors are independently associated with adolescents' attitudes toward sex and abstinence? The report also provides background and a brief review of existing literature and discusses implications of the findings.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent sexuality, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Parents, Racial factors, Research

U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. 2009. Domestic abstinence-only programs: Assessing the evidence. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 673 pp. (Serials No. 110-115)

Annotation: This report contains the oral and written testimonies of members of Congress, and medical professionals about the effectiveness of abstinence-only sexual education. Debate concerns the facts of adolescent and youth sexual activity and whether abstinence-only, or comprehensive programs are more effective in serving the health needs of young people. It contains extensive studies from a variety of organizations and transcripts of an earlier hearing on the issue.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescents, Federal legislation, Sexual behavior, Sexuality education, Youth

Wiley D, Wilson K, Valentine R. 2009. Sexuality education in Texas public schools: Just say don't know. [Austin, TX]: Texas Freedom Network, 66 pp.

Annotation: This report examines materials from sex education programs used in Texas school districts to describe the state of sexuality education in Texas schools. The mainly abstinence only programs of Texas receive evaluation on terms of accuracy of information, appropriateness of content and effectiveness. The report includes many examples from actual programs.

Contact: Texas Freedom Network, P.O. Box 1624, Austin, TX 78767, Telephone: (512) 322-0545 Fax: (512) 32-0550 E-mail: tfn@tfn.org Web Site: http://www.tfn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Curriculum development, Educational materials, Program evaluation, Sexual behavior, Sexuality education, Texas

Kay JF, Jackson A. 2008. Sex, lies and stereotypes: How abstinence-only programs harm women and girls. New York, NY: Legal Momentum, 62 pp.

Annotation: This report explores issues from a roundtable meeting of experts from a range of disciplines to discuss abstinence-only programs and their particular impact on women and girls. In addition, broader academic research and original research contributed to the report. Topics include reviews of abstinence-only funding and history; domestic abstinence-only programs in practice; specific harm to women and girls, such as reinforcing stereotypes, increasing health risks, and violating human rights; how exporting the abstinence-only agenda fails women and girls internationally; and issues in looking ahead.

Contact: Legal Momentum, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY 10014, Telephone: (212) 925-6635 Web Site: http://www.legalmomentum.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Federal initiatives, Female children, Reproductive health, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Sexuality education, Women's health, Women's rights

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2008. Abstinence education: Assessing the accuracy and effectiveness of federally funded programs. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report on the oversight of federally funded abstinence-until-marriage education programs discusses efforts by the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), states, and researchers (1) to assess the scientific accuracy of materials used in abstinence-until marriage education programs and (2) to assess the effectiveness of abstinence-until-marriage education programs. The report also provides background and discusses factors limiting the conclusions that can be drawn about the effectiveness of matierals, as well as the applicability to abstinence-until-marriage education programs of a federal statutory provision requiring that educational materials prepared by DHHS's grantees, among others, that are specifically designed to address sexually transmitted diseases, contain medically accurate information on the effectiveness or lack of effectiveness of condoms in preventing the diseases the materials are designed to address.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-08-664T.

Keywords: Abstinence, Condoms, Contraception, Educational materials, Federal programs, Legislation, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2007. Information on state abstinence from abstinence-only education (Section 510) funding. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 7 pp. (MCH technical assistance)

Annotation: This document is a response to a member's information reequest. It provides a chart showing which states declined Section 510 Abstinence funds in 2007, whether they had received funding in 2006, which state applied for funding in 2007 but not in 2006, and the amounts these states were eligible to receive. It also provides links to media reports, organizational policy statements on sex education, state program evaluations, and other evaluations.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Legislation, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Sexuality education, State programs

Clark MA, Trenholm C, Devaney B, Wheeler J, Quay L. 2007. Impacts of the Heritage Keepers Life Skills education component: Final report. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 110 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the impact of the Life Skills Education Component (a character-based program designed to enhance life skills thought to be supportive of sexual abstinence and to empower students to avoid sexual activity and other risky behaviors) on students in middle school and high school in Edgefield, South Carolina. The Life Skills Education Component is part of the Heritage Keepers abstinence education program, in which all students in the study had participated. The report presents estimates of the incremental impact of Life Skills on potential mediators of adolescent sexual activity as well as on adolescents' sexual abstinence, their risks of pregnancy and of contracting sexually transmitted diseases, and other behavioral outcomes. The report is based on data collected in 2005-2996 from more than 600 adolescents. The report, which includes an executive summary, presents the design and methods for the impact evaluation, intermediate outcomes related to adolescent sexual activity, knowledge and perceptions of risks associated with adolescent sex, impacts on sexual absinence and adolescent risk behavior, and conclusions. References are included. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report includes three appendices: (1) an outline of the Heritage Keepers curricula, (2) supporting tables for impact analysis, and (3) survey questions.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, High school students, Middle schools, Programs, Risk taking, Sexually transmitted diseases

Trenholm C, Devaney B, Fortson K, Quay L, Wheeler J, Clark M. 2007. Impacts of four Title V, Section 510 abstinence education programs: Final report. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 64 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This report presents the behavioral impact findings of four selected programs that received funding through Title V, Section 510 abstinence education grants. The report examines the impacts of these programs on adolescents' sexual abstinence, their risks of pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, and other behavioral outcomes. The report, which includes an executive summary, is divided into the following chapters: (1) introduction, (2) focal programs, (3) design and methods for the final impact evaluation, (4) impacts on sexual abstinence and teen risk behaviors, (5) knowledge and perceptions of risks associated with teen sex, (6) predictors of sexual abstinence, and (7) conclusions. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the text. The report includes five appendices: (1) supporting tables, (2) outlines of curricula, (3) survey questions, (4) estimated impacts for selected subgroups, and (5) program mediators of teen sexual activity.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Federal programs, Financing, MCH research, Program evaluation, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Crosse M, Peterson K, DeMots K, Dooley P, Friday K, Klazkin J, Shefrin A. 2006. Abstinence education: Efforts to assess the accuracy and effectiveness of federally funded programs. Washingtonm, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 57 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the oversight of federally funded abstinence-until-marriage education programs. The report provides information on (1) efforts by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and states to assess the scientific accuracy of materials used in these programs and (2) efforts by DHHS, states, and researchers to assess the effectiveness of these programs. The report also includes results in brief, background, conclusions, and recommendations for executive action. The report includes four appendices: (1) the Health Resources and Services Administration's technical assistance contract for abstinence education, (2) method for identifying and reviewing research studies, (3) comments from DHHS, and (4) Government Accountability Office contact and staff acknowledgments. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Marriage, Abstinence, Federal programs, Financing, Program evaluation, Sexuality education

Hendricks K, Thickstun P, Khurshid A, Malhotra S, Thiele H. 2006. The attack on abstinence education: Fact or fallacy? (Upd. ed.). Austin, TX: Medical Institute for Sexual Health, 24 pp.

Annotation: This paper critiques a review article titled Abstinence and Abstinence-Only Education and a second article titled Abstinence-Only Education Policies and Programs: A Position Paper of the Society of Adolescent Medicine. Both were published by the Journal of Adolescent Health. The paper, which includes an executive summary, discusses the articles' methodologies, the way they define abstinence, their treatment of (1) the physical and psychological health outcomes of adolescent sexual behaviors and of public support for abstinence and comprehensive sexuality education; (2) currrent federal policy and local programs; (3) concepts of efficacy for abstinence in preventing pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections; (4) abstinence-only education and gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender adolescents; (5) the human right to sexual health information; (and 6) ethical obligations of health professionals and health educators. References are incluced.

Contact: Medical Institute for Sexual Health, 1101 S. Capital of Texas Highway, Building B, Suite 100, Austin, TX 78746, Telephone: (512) 328-6268 Secondary Telephone: (800) 892-9484 Fax: (512) 328-6269 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.medinstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Human rights, Local programs, Pregnancy, Prevention, Public policy, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Kempner ME. 2006. Toward a sexually healthy America: Abstinence-only-until-marriage programs that try to keep our youth "scared chaste". New York, NY: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 70 pp.

Annotation: This report is based on a review conducted by the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States of nine of the most widely available abstinence-only-until-marriage curricula designed for junior and senior high school students that emphasize the negative consequences of premarital sexual activity, portray sexual behavior as universally dangerous, and deny young people information about pregnancy and disease prevention. The report discusses the educational philosophy of these curricula and their scope and context. Topics covered include sexuality and abstinence, religion and morality, fear and shame, sexual pressure, sexual arousal, sexually transmitted diseases, HIV and AIDS, condoms and contraception, marriage and family structure, gender, sexual orientation, pregnancy options and abortion, teaching methods, curricula strong point, and the future of sexuality education. Brief reviews of the curricula are provided. A list of abstinence-education curricula that do not include messages of fear or shame is included. The report includes references.

Contact: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 90 John Street Suite 402, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 819-9770 Fax: (212) 819-9776 E-mail: siecus@siecus.org Web Site: http://www.siecus.org Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Abortion, Abstinence, Adolescent sexuality, Condoms, Contraception, Curricula, Families, HIV, Marriage, Moral values, Pregnancy, Prevention, Religion, Sexual identity, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Burt MR, Capizzano J, Zweig JM, Herwantoro S, Fiorillo A. 2005. Youth development approaches in adolescent family life demonstration projects: Final report. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 118 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the possible effects of youth development and abstinence education programming on adolescent birth rates and sexual risk taking. It presents results of a literature review pertaining to abstinence or delay of sexual activity with special attention to how factors that are the target of youth development approaches have been shown to affect these outcomes. It next examines year-end and evaluation reports for Adolescent Family Life (AFL) demonstration projects through December 2004, and presents the results of seven site visits that looked at the degree to which youth development activities and abstinence-oriented activities are integrated and whether the two program components might be separated for evaluation. The report concludes with recommendations for how to improve evaluation designs. The report includes references and five appendices: (1) a table describing studies that looked at youth development impacts on adolescents' sexual behavior and antecedents of first sex, (2) the protocol used to review the AFL documents, (3) A table listing enrichment activities associated with specific youth development objectives, (4) a summary of program and youth development characteristics from the document reviews, and (5) a suggested annual report outline.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Demonstration programs, Federal programs, Final reports, Program evaluation, Research, Sexuality education, Youth development

Maynard RA, Trenholm C, Devaney B, Johnson A, Clark MA, Homrighausen J, Kalay E. 2005. First-year impacts of four Title V, Section 510 Abstinence Education Programs. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 144 pp.

Annotation: This report, prepared for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, presents first-year impact findings of four selected programs that have received Title V, Section 510 Abstinence Education Program Funds since 1998. The four programs are My Choice, My Future in Powhatan, Virginia; ReCapturing the Vision in Miami, Florida; Teens in Control in Clarksdale, Mississippi; and Families United to Prevent Teen Pregnancy (FUPTP) in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. This report examines the extent to which the programs affected the level and nature of health, family life, and sex education services youth received during the first year after enrolling in the program, and it provides estimates of the first-year impacts of the Title V, Section 510 programs on intermediate outcomes that may be related to teen sexual activity and other risk-taking behavior. These outcomes include measures of views on abstinence, adolescent sex, and marriage; peer influences and relations; self-concept, refusal skills, and communications with parents; perceived consequences of adolescent and nonmarital sex; and expectations to abstain from sexual intercourse. Statistical data are presented in tables and figures throughout the report. Information on the study design and methodology is provided in addition to a discussion section and references. Appendices include support figures and tables, outlines of curricula used by the study programs, and survey questions.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Case studies, Community programs, Family life education, Federal programs, Florida, Mississippi, Prevention, Program descriptions, Program evaluations, Risk taking, Sexuality education, Statistics, Surveys, Virginia, Wisconsin

Abstinence in Motion (AIM) Project. [2004]. Giving our most vulnerable a first line of defense: The results of the AIM Community-Based Abstinence Education Project for Rural Alabama. [Troy, AL]: Abstinence in Motion (AIM) Project, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of the AIM Community-Based Abstinence Education Project for Rural Alabama. The AIM Project is an abstinence education outreach program focusing on rural communities in the state. The report describes the project and discusses (1) how welfare reform and abstinence education work together against child poverty, (2) scientific evaluation of the project, (3) student satisfaction with the project, and (4) reducing welfare payrolls and poverty in rural Alabama. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: AIM Project, Troy Regional Medical Center, 1340 Highway 231 South Suite 1, Troy, AL 36081, Telephone: (334) 670-5261 Fax: (334) 670-5256 E-mail: info@aimproject.com Web Site: http://www.aimproject.com Available at no charge.

Keywords: Abstinence education, Alabama, Child health, Children, Communities, Evaluation, Outreach, Poverty, Rural populations, SPRANS, State projects, Students, Welfare reform, Welfare services

Hauser D. 2004. Five years of abstinence-only-until-marriage education: Assessing the impact. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 19 pp. (Title V state evaluations)

Annotation: This report reviews findings from 11 evaluations of abstinence-only programs, which promote sexual abstinence outside of marriage as the only acceptable standard of behavior for young people. The report discusses program components and evaluation designs, provides a summary of evaluation results, and offers a discussion. Each of the 11 programs are then reviewed separately. Statistical information is presented in one table within the report. References are included.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Evaluation, Federal programs, Sexuality education, State programs, Title V programs

Manlove J, Franzetta K, McKinney K, Papillo AR, Terry-Humen E. 2004. No time to waste: Programs to reduce teen pregnancy among middle school-aged youth. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 60 pp. (Putting what works to work)

Annotation: Produced in partnership with Child Trends, No Time to Waste provides detailed descriptions of programs for middle school-age students in abstinence and sex education and in HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases that have been shown through careful research to have a positive impact on adolescent sexual behavior. The publication provides detailed descriptions of program curriculum, costs, and evaluation results. It also describes programs that did not change participants' behavior. No Time to Waste was developed as part of the ongoing Putting What Works to Work project.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Abstinence, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Community programs, Costs, HIV, Middle schools, Model programs, Prevention, Prevention programs, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Commissioner's Task Force on Abstinence Education. 2004. Final report. Concord, NH: Commissioner's Task Force on Abstinence Education, New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, 30 pp.

Annotation: This final report discusses New Hampshire's Task Force on Abstinence Education, which was convened in 2003 for the purpose of examining the Abstinence Education Program of the Social Security Act in New Hampshire. The report, which includes an executive summary, also provides subgroup findings for the measurement, education programs, target audience, marketing, program location, and issues addressed by DHHS subgroups of the task force. Recommendations are included. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report includes two appendices: federal and state criteria for abstinence only programs and a text of a proposed marketing letter.

Contact: New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Maternal and Child Health, 29 Hazen Drive, Concord, NH 03301, Telephone: (603) 271-4517 Secondary Telephone: (800) 852-3345, x4517 Fax: (603) 271-4519 Web Site: http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/dphs/bchs/mch/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Federal programs, New Hampshire, Sexuality education, State programs, Task forces

U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Government Reform—Minority Staff Special Investigations Division. 2004. The content of federally funded abstinence-only education programs. Washington, DC: Committee on Government Reform Minority Office, U.S. House of Representatives, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report evaluates the content of the most popular abstinence-only curricula used by grantees of the largest federal abstinence initiative, SPRANS (Special Programs of Regional and National Significance) Community-Based Abstinence Education. Included are an executive summary, background on abstinence-only programs, the purpose and methodology of the evaluation, a review of the findings, and a conclusion. Topics include how the majority of abstinence-only curricula contain false and misleading information about (1) the effectiveness of contraceptives, (2) risks of abortion, (3) how abstinence-only curricula blur religion and science, (4) how stereotypes about girls and boys are treated as fact, (5) the risks of sexual activity, and (6) how curricula contain scientific errors.

Contact: U.S. Congress. House of Representatives, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, 2157 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC 20515, Telephone: (202) 225-5051 Web Site: http://oversight.house.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Abstinence, Adolescent sexuality, Contraception, Contraceptive use, Curricula, Disease prevention, Federal grants, Federal programs, Misinformation, Pregnancy, Program evaluation, SPRANS, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Collins C, Alagiri P, Summers T, Morin SF. 2002. Abstinence only vs. comprehensive sex education: What are the arguments? What is the evidence?. San Francisco, CA: University of California at San Francisco, AIDS Research Institute, 29 pp. (Policy monograph series)

Annotation: This monograph explores the arguments and the evidence for and against the effectiveness of abstinence only vs. comprehensive sex education. The monograph, which includes an executive summary discusses the role of federal and state policy, what research tells us, arguments for abstinence-only sex education, and arguments for comprehensive sex education. A conclusion is offered as well. One appendix includes a table of studies. The monograph concludes with endnotes.

Contact: University of California, San Francisco, AIDS Research Institute, 50 Beale Street, Suite 1300, San Francisco, CA 94105, Telephone: (415) 597-9164 Fax: (415) 597-8160 E-mail: drobb@ari.ucsf.edu Web Site: http://ari.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Public policy, Research, Sexuality education

Kirby D. 2002. Do abstinence-only programs delay the initiation of sex among young people and reduce teen pregnancy?. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 7 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the effectiveness of abstinence-only programs in delaying sex and/or reducing adolescent pregnancy. It reviews ten studies highlighted in a previous publication by the Heritage Foundation as being effective abstinence-only programs and discusses whether the research design of the studies was adequate to demonstrate the effectiveness of the programs. It discusses standards of evidence for evaluating research and provides a summary and conclusions. The report concludes with references.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Program evaluation, Risk taking, Sexuality education

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.