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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

AIM Partners: Products Developed by the National Healthy Start Association (NHSA) Bibliography

AIM Partners: Products Developed by the National Healthy Start Association (NHSA)

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 13 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published primarily in the last ten years.  

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 13 records.

CityMatCH, Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, National Healthy Start Association, EveryWoman Southeast. 2013. Addressing racism's impact on infant mortality: Lessons learned from the Partnership to Eliminate Disparities in Infant Mortality. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1 video (60 min., 24 sec.).

Annotation: This webinar explores the persistent gap in infant mortality between white and black infants and how to address challenges and opportunities. The experiences of 11 community and state teams and partners in addressing racism's impact on infant mortality are shared and lessons learned are described with actionable steps for programs to take. Examples are provided from California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Ohio, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Texas, and Wisconsin.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Case studies, Community programs, Infant death, Infant mortality, Multimedia, Racial factors, Racism, State initiatives

CityMatCH, Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, National Healthy Start Association, EveryWoman Southeast. 2013. Putting the life course concept into practice: Lessons from the Northeast Florida Healthy Start Coalition. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1 video (60 min., 29 sec.). (A lifecourse theory to practice webinar)

Annotation: This webinar, broadcast June 6, 2013, discusses the life course theory and the capacity of the approach to address health inequalities for African American women as experienced by the Northeast Florida Healthy Start Coalition, The Magnolia Project. It also discusses strategies for integrating the life course approach into a community-based program, and describes challenges and opportunities to integrating this approach into daily practice.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Blacks, Case studies, Florida, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Healthy Start, Life cycle, Women's health

National Healthy Start Association. (2012). Saving our nation's babies: The impact of the federal Healthy Start Initiative (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: National Healthy Start Association, 59 pp.

Annotation: This publication provides an overview of the history of the Healthy Start Initiative for the past 20 years and provides program descriptions for the 105 projects across the country. Topics highlighted include leadership training, regional roundtables, infant mortality, racism/health disparities, and fatherhood involvement.

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Healthy Start, History, Infant health, Infant mortality, Maternal health, Prenatal care, Prevention programs, Program descriptions

National Healthy Start Association. [2011]. Infant mortality awareness campaign [fact card]. Washington, DC: National Healthy Start Association, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact card describes the infant mortality awareness campaign, Celebrate Day 366...Every Baby Deserves a Chance, developed by the National Healthy Start Association to celebrate babies living beyond the first year and take action in support of the Healthy People 2020 goal of improving the health and well-being of women, infants, children, and families. The fact card provides an overview of infant mortality, including statistics on the causes of infant mortality, differences in rates between non-Hispanic white and African American populations, and the infant mortality ranking of the United States in comparison with other countries. Cost savings associated with a reduction in the U.S. infant mortality rate are also highlighted, along with the ways in which the federally-funded Healthy Start program is working to improve birth outcomes.

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Infant mortality, Mortality rates, Pregnancy outcome, Prevention, Public awareness campaigns, Statistics

National Healthy Start Association. 2011. 2011-2014 strategic plan. Baltimore, MD: National Healthy Start Association, 1 p.

Annotation: The 2011 document describes the mission and vision statement of the National Healthy Start Association and outlines four goals with objectives. The 2002 and 2005 strategic plans for the NHSA provides background information on infant mortality, low birthweight and racial disparities in perinatal outcomes, the Healthy Start program, NHSA and its accomplishments to date, the process undertaken to develop a 3-year strategic plan, and the strategic plan itself, including objectives and specific action steps. The strategic plan includes appendices: a map of the Healthy Start communities and NHSA's committee descriptions. An organizational chart and a list of members of the board of directors is also included.

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health programs, Healthy Start, Infant health, Infant mortality, Low birthweight, National programs, Perinatal health, Strategic plans

National Healthy Start Association. 2011. Celebrate day 366: Every baby deserves a chance. Washington, DC: National Healthy Start Association,

Annotation: The campaign website contains an events calendar, a web badge, a fact card, and a toolkit with ideas for fundraising activities and advocacy; statistics; and tips for the media, public relations, and marketing. An order form for t-shirts, a tote, and a bike bottle is also available from the website. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Health promotion, Healthy Start, Infant mortality, Local programs, Marketing, Media campaigns, Multimedia, Prevention, Public awareness campaigns, Public relations

Partnership to Eliminate Disparities in Infant Mortality. 2011. Infant mortality and racism: Action Learning Collaborative meeting summary. [no place]: Partnership to Eliminate Disparities in Infant Mortality, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the second of three meetings of the Infant Mortality & Racism Action Learning Collaborative held on June 1-3, 2009, in Long Beach, California. The report provides background and discusses communicating about racism; racism, stress, and reproductive disadvantage; and planning for change.

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant mortality, Racism, Reproductive health, Stress

American Academy of Pediatrics and National Healthy Start Association. 2011. The social emotional development of young children: Resource guide for Healthy Start staff. Washington, DC: National Healthy Start Association, 12 pp.

Annotation: This guide focuses on the influence of early childhood experiences and skills on life-long trajectories of health and productivity. Topics include understanding brain development, social emotional development, the life course, and how Healthy Start staff can help parents promote their children's social and emotional development. The guide was designed with three unique covers as a way to address diversity within communities. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community based services, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Health promotion, Healthy Start, Life course, Mental health, Parent education, Psychosocial development

National Healthy Start Association. 2010. Federal Healthy Start Initiative: A national network for effective home visitation and family support services. Washington, DC: National Healthy Start Association, 19 pp.

Annotation: This white paper highlights the strengths and competencies of the federal Healthy Start Initiative. It was produced in response to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act designed to strengthen and approve home visiting programs, improve service coordination for at-risk communities, and identify and provide comprehensive evidence-based home visiting services to families that reside in at-risk communities. The paper provides a brief history of the Healthy Start Initiative, an overview of the Healthy Start network and core services, key attributes of the Healthy Start home visitation model, Healthy Start model programs, and implications for health reform. A map indicating Healthy Start locations in the United States and a logic model for national evaluation of Healthy Start programs are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal legislation, Federal programs, Health care reform, Healthy Start, Home visiting, Infant mortality, Model programs, Prevention programs

Bond J, Cunningham S, Xang E, George Ph, Lu M, Perry E, Parker W, Scarborough K, Div M, Warren R. 2010. It takes two to tango: Defining the role of fathers. Washington, DC: National Healthy Start Association, 8 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief discusses the impact that men and fathers have on pregnancy and birth outcomes, and it considers how that role is often overlooked or not acknowledged. It highlights comments from experts in the field about how to define the role of father and what that means. The brief outlines key strategies and recommendations on how to further engage and include men in programs and policies related to women and children.

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family relations, Father child relations, Fathers, Parenting

Williams L, O'Neil ME. 2010. Two pieces of the puzzle: A collaboration between the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring Systems (PRAMS) and the Federal Healthy Start Initiative. Washington, DC: National Healthy Start Association, 4 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief describes how the Federal Healthy Start Initiative and the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) are collaborating in efforts to identify, assess, and address maternal behaviors and conditions that prevent women from having a healthy pregnancy. The brief describes the goals of federal Healthy Start programs to reduce infant mortality.and explains how PRAMS (the surveillance system developed by the U.S. Center's for Disease Control and Prevention to identify and monitor maternal behavior and experiences before, during, and after pregnancy) collects state-specific data on core topics in maternal and child health. The brief describes why it makes sense for the Healthy Start and PRAMS programs to work together and provides examples of collaborative efforts in New York City, Georgia, South Dakota, Michigan, New Mexico, North Carolina, and Oklahoma. It also explains how programs can begin to collaborate.

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Healthy Start, Infant mortality, Maternal health, Population surveillance, Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, Pregnancy outcome, Prevention programs, Risk assessment, State initiatives, Surveys

National Healthy Start Association. 2009. National Infant Mortality Awareness Month toolkit. Washington, DC: National Healthy Start Association, 25 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit, designed for Healthy Start projects and community public health projects for national infant mortality awareness month, lists facts and statistics on infant mortality and includes ideas and strategies for fundraising activities, advocacy, facts and statistics, as well as tips for approaching the media.

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Healthy Start, Infant mortality, Prevention programs, Public awareness campaigns, Resource materials

National Healthy Start Association. 2005. Final report of the 2004 regional conferences. Baltimore, MD: National Healthy Start Association, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report describes six regional conferences for Healthy Start projects across the country held in the first half of 2004 to assess the technical assistance needs of Healthy Start projects and to find out how the National Healthy Start Association could best meet the projects' needs. The report, divided into five sections, outlines the project goals and objectives and the planning and evaluation process, and provides a comprehensive analysis of each regional conference, as well as recommendations to the association and lessons learned during the process. The appendix includes meeting agendas and planning team members, a map of the Healthy Start communities, and a list of the 2005 Board of Directors of the association.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Final reports, Conferences, Healthy Start, Infant mortality, Needs assessment, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Program improvement, Technical assistance

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.