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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

AIM Partners: Products Developed by the National Business Group on Health (NBGH) Bibliography

AIM Partners: Products Developed by the National Business Group on Health (NBGH)

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 23 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published in the last ten years that focus on educational materials and curricula for teachers of school health from the preschool through high school level.

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 23 records.

Consumer Reports Health. 2013. What to reject when you're expecting: 10 procedures to think twice about during your pregnancy. Yonkers, NY: Consumer Reports, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report describes medical procedures that when conducted during normal pregnancy, labor, or childbirth have been associated with poorer outcomes for women, infants, or both. It also provides tips on what women can do before becoming pregnant to reduce the risk of adverse outcomes for themselves and their infants. A list of organizations that may serve as resources and sources for hospital data by state are included. It is part of a health communication program created by Consumer Reports for members of the National Business Group on Health based on information from the Consumer Reports website.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Childbirth, Consumer education, Consumer protection, Pregnancy, Risk taking

National Business Group on Health. 2011. Methodology for health disparities cost impact tool. Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 8 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes why and how the National Business Group on Health developed the Health Disparities Cost Impact Tool that allows employers to evaluate the economic impact of health disparities based on their specific demographic profile. It explains the purpose of the tool, the development process behind it, the methodology used, and the data elements contained within the online evaluation instrument. Included are tables that list and describe the individual data elements contained in the input and output fields and an explanation of the applied comparative estimates based on nationalized employer-sponsored health plan data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comparative analysis, Cost effectiveness, Costs, Employer initiatives, Heath status disparities

Young J, Sherrets D. [2010]. Childhood obesity: It's everyone's business. Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 64 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit, which provides information about childhood obesity, begins with a series of obesity-related statements that are identified as either true or false, with an explanation of the evidence for the statement. It then offers information about how employers can engage stakeholders through benefits design or the use of incentives to effect behavior change, thus helping to prevent childhood obesity. Weight-management programs with supporting evidence, as well as employee education, are also discussed, and detailed information for families about childhood obesity is presented. The document concludes with a section about community and philanthropic efforts. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior, Child health, Communities, Consumer education, Employer initiatives, Families, Financing, Health insurance, Nutrition, Obesity, Parents, Physical activity, Prevention, Treatment

Campbell KP, ed. 2010–. Investing in maternal and child health: An employer's toolkit (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 304 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit outlines opportunities that employers have to improve the health of children and adolescents (from birth to age 21) and women (preconception, pregnant, and postpartum periods). Topics include health benefit design, beneficiary education and engagement, and health promotion programs. Recommendations related to minimum dental benefits, cost-sharing arrangements; and other information pertinent to plan design and administration are provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Children, Cost effectiveness, Employee benefits, Infant, Multimedia, Oral health, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Women's health, Workplace health promotion

Sothermel S, Reagin Ford A. 2010. Investing in maternal and child health: An employer cost-savings calculator. Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 19 pp.

Annotation: This technical implementation brief describes a tool that calculates the financial value of preventive health benefits for women of child-bearing age and children. In this brief, a simulated business case study is used to describe how an employer might use the calculator to analyze the cost-savings impact that implementing preventive benefits may have on direct health care costs as well as on indirect health and productivity costs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Business, Case studies, Child health, Costs, Employee benefits, Health care reform, Health care systems, Models, Preventive health services, Women's health

National Business Group on Health. 2010. Preterm birth and elective inductions prior to 37 weeks. [Washington, DC]: National Business Group on Health, 3 pp. (Health tips)

Annotation: This paper summarizes research findings on preterm births and early elective inductions in the United States, providing statistics on changes in the rate of preterm births and the health of babies born prior to 37 weeks. The paper also discusses the higher medical costs associated with late preterm births and offers guidelines to help employers reduce preterm births and the associated costs. Included are recommendations on elective deliveries provided by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), along with additional resources for both employers and employees. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Educational materials, Employer initiatives, Guidelines, Health care costs, Premature infants, Premature labor, Preterm birth, Prevention programs, Statistics

Kraczkowsky K, Reagin A, Sherrets D. 2009. An employer's guide to child and adolescent mental health: Recommendations for the workplace, health plans, and employee assistance programs. Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 39 pp.

Annotation: This monograph examines the impact of child and adolescent behavioral health disorders on the workplace by direct and indirect costs, its epidemiology in the U.S., and treatment and cost trends. It also describes the state of child and adolescent behavioral health treatment and makes recommendations to employers on how to better address this challenge with adjustments to their health plan and to their workplace culture.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior disorders, Children, Employee benefits, Health insurance, Mental health, Workplace health promotion, Youth

Trahan LC, Williamson P. 2009. Eliminating racial and ethnic health disparities: A business case update for employers. Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, Center for Prevention and Health Services, , 17 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief explores key causes of health disparities in the United States and its work force, makes a case for why it is important for employers to address disparities in health and health care, and presents steps employers can take to address health disparities. Examples of racial and ethnic health disparities are provided.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Employer initiatives, Ethnic factors, Health, Income factors, Low income groups, Prevention, Racial factors, Treatment

Trahan L, Phillips K. 2009. Investing in maternal and child health: Strategies for state employers. Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 43 pp.

Annotation: This presentation discusses the business case for investing in maternal, child, and adolescent health (MCAH) and describes a model for improving MCAH through employer-sponsored benefits and health promotion programs. Contents include a description of a resource guide on MCAH plan design, education, and communication and related resources.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Business, Child heath, Employer initiatives, Maternal health, Models, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, State programs, Work family issues

Slavit WI ed. 2009. Investing in workplace breastfeeding programs and policies: An employer's toolkit [rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 71 pp.

Annotation: This eight-section kit is intended for employers, human resource managers, expectant and new parents, and health professionals interested in encouraging business and public agencies to establish, maintain, and expand lactation-support programs for their employees. The kit is divided into the following sections: (1) the business case for breastfeeding promotion, (2) workplace breastfeeding options, (3) breastfeeding promotion program components (4) employer case studies, (5) getting started, (6) methods of measuring success, (7) other ways to support breastfeeding women, and (8) tools for employers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Working mothers

American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, National Business Group on Health, American Academy of Pediatrics, and National Institute for Health Care Management. 2009. Medical homes for children. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau,

Annotation: This webcast, which was conducted on April 21, 2009, highlights the importance of how children uniquely benefit from the medical home, shares current efforts to implement the medical home across multiple stakeholder groups, and seeks to spur future collaborative efforts in support of the medical home. The webcast can be viewed in various formats, including video + slides + captioning, presentation slides, transcript (html or pdf), or audio only. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Multimedia, Chid health, Collaboration, Medical home, Primary care, World wide web

Flood G. 2009. Recommended wellness visits charts for children, adolescents, and women. Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health,

Annotation: These charts advise consumers of tests, screenings, immunizations, and other procedures that should be administered by health care providers during regular wellness visits. The charts cover items to be included at each preventive care visit or oral health visit for children and women, newborn to age seventy-five. The document also includes descriptions of each of the recommended measures and procedures. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Dental care, Infant development, Infant health services, Preventive health services, Primary care, Screening, Toddlers, Well child care, Women, Young women

Reagin A. 2009. Strengthening health care for children: Primary care and the medical home. Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 17 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief focuses on primary care for children and the medical home. The brief discusses the employers' role in improving the quality of children's health care and expanding access to it, current problems in health care for children, the importance of primary care, and potential models for improvement and employer strategies. A case study about a medical home project with the goal of managing Medicaid patients in rural areas by linking small practices with a local hospital and other safety net providers is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children with special health care needs, Employer initiatives, Medical home, Pediatrics, Primary care, Screening, Service coordination

Finch RA, Phillips K. 2005. An employer's guide to behavioral health services: A roadmap and recommendations for evaluating, designing, and implementing behavioral health services. Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 95 pp.

Annotation: This guide examines the employer's role in behavioral health care, a continuum of health services for individuals at risk or, or having, mental, behavioral, or addictive disorders. It examines major trends in the epidemiology, treatment, and cost of behavioral healthcare in the United State, discusses the state of employer-sponsored behavioral health services, and makes recommendations to improve the design, delivery, and purchase of employer-sponsored behavioral healthcare services. It also provides an overview of the President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Employee benefits, Employer initiatives, Health care programs, Health insurance programs, Mental disorders, Mental health, Strategic plans, Substance abuse

Rees C, Finch R. 2004. Health improvement: A comprehensive guide to designing, implementing, and evaluating worksite programs. Washington, DC: Center for Prevention and Health Services, National Business Group on Health, 15 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This guide is for employers interested in health improvement, regardless of whether the company is looking to design a new program altogether or thinking about options to improve or expand existing programs. It provides the following: (1) information on the structure of health improvement programs, (2) the business case for health improvement, (3) examples of best practices, and (4) the means for evaluation. A summary is provided as well as tips and resources for employers. References are also included.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Business, Employee assistance programs, Employee benefits, Fiscal management, Models, Program development, Program evaluation, Workplace health promotion

Washington Business Group on Health. 2000. Employers and public health leaders: Sharing accountability to advance maternal and child health. Washington, DC: Washington Business Group on Health, 9 pp.

Annotation: This document is the proceedings of the maternal and child health forum held by the Washington Business Group on Health in 2000. It includes background material, summaries from regional discussion groups on maternal and child health care delivery, and general discussion outcomes. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Employer initiatives, Federal MCH programs, Health care delivery, Local MCH programs, Public health, Workplace health promotion

Washington Business Group on Health. 2000. Family health in brief. Washington, DC: Washington Business Group on Health, irregular.

Annotation: This set of briefing papers provides information for employers on topics of importance to their roles in providing health services to their employees. They are a part of a cooperative agreement called Partners for Information and Communications (PIC). Each issue includes a companion newsletter insert called Family Health Update which lists resources related to family health. Issues in the series cover (1) employer innovations in maternal and child health, (2) breastfeeding support at the workplace, and (3) promoting healthy pregnancies through contraception and counseling. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available at no charge.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Child health, Corporate programs, Cost effectiveness, Employee benefits, Employer initiatives, Family health, Infant health, MCH programs, Maternal health, Model programs, Prenatal care, Worksite health promotion

Washington Business Group on Health. 2000. Healthy families, healthy companies: Employer innovations in maternal and child health. Washington, DC: Washington Business Group on Health, 8 pp. (Family health in brief; issue no. 1)

Annotation: This issue brief updates and expands on the information in Washington Business Group on Health's 1996 publication Business, Babies, and the Bottom Line.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available at no charge.

Keywords: Child health, Corporate programs, Cost effectiveness, Employee benefits, Employer initiatives, Infant health, MCH programs, Maternal health, Prenatal care, Worksite health promotion

Washington Business Group on Health. 2000. Promoting healthy pregnancies: Counseling and contraception as the first step. Washington, DC: Washington Business Group on Health, 8 pp. (Family health in brief; issue no. 3)

Annotation: This issue brief addresses the importance of family planning in women's health care, reasons employers should cover family planning services in their employee health insurance plans, and employer concerns.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available at no charge.

Keywords: Contraception, Corporate programs, Cost effectiveness, Counseling, Employee benefits, Employer initiatives, Family planning, Health insurance, Infant health promotion, Pregnancy counseling, Women's health promotion, Workplace health promotion

Jacobson M, Kolarek MH, Newton B. 1996. Business, babies, and the bottom line: Corporate innovations and best practices in maternal and child health. Washington, DC: Washington Business Group on Health, National Business Partnership to Improve Family Health, 51 pp.

Annotation: This report describes efforts large corporations in the United States have made to improve the health of the mothers who work for them and that of their children. It profiles innovative practices and analyzes the bottom line results of some corporate programs, and it spotlights the major features of other programs. The report also includes a tips for successfully initiating maternal and child health programs in other corporations. It also lists of the corporations profiled and cites useful resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Contact Phone: (202) 408-9320 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Contact E-mail: jacobson@wbgh.com, or kolarek@wbgh.com Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Corporate programs, Cost effectiveness, Infant health, Prenatal care, Workplace health promotion

Behrens R. 1990. Reaching families through worksite and community health promotion programs. Washington, DC: Washington Business Group on Health, 88 pp.

Annotation: This report, discusses why families are important to businesses, barriers to reaching families with effective health promotion programs, successful methods for reaching families, publicizing and evaluating programs, targeting special groups, steps to ensure success, ideas that have and haven't worked, and case examples.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Contact Phone: (202) 408-9320 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Corporate programs, Workplace health promotion

Cronin C, Hartman R. 1989. The corporate perspective on maternal and child health. Washington, DC: Washington Business Group on Health, 67 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the status of this country's maternal and child health efforts, corporate initiatives in this area, and opportunities for public and private sector collaboration. An overview of demographic, societal, and economic trends affecting the health of mothers, infants, children, and families is presented. Corporate programs for prenatal care, maternity benefits, altering the work environment, special issues relating to child health care, public/private partnerships in child health, alternative work arrangements for working parents, and child care programs and assistance are discussed. The report is based on the Leadership Seminar on Maternal and Child Health co-sponsored by the Washington Business Group on Health and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Contact Phone: (202) 408-9320 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Corporate programs, Maternal health, Parental leave, Working parents

Glanz K. 1986. Nutrition programs in the workplace. Washington, DC: Washington Business Group on Health, 36 pp. (Worksite wellness series)

Annotation: This paper discusses why nutrition is important, why it is important to businesses, and the status of worksite nutrition programs. A review and evaluation of worksite nutrition programs and outcomes with company examples are provided. A list of worksite nutrition resources and references is included.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Contact Phone: (202) 408-9320 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org $15.00.

Keywords: Business, Nutrition, Workplace

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.