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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

AIM Partners: Products Developed by the American Bar Association (ABA) Bibliography

AIM Partners: Products Developed by the American Bar Association (ABA)

Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 11 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Digital Library online catalog.

The MCH Digital Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 11 records.

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law. 2013. The health of children in foster care: Making improvements through Medicaid and the law. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation,

Annotation: This webinar, held on April 16, 2013, focuses on opportunities to improve the health of children in foster care. Topics include trends in the health of children in foster care, including their unmet needs and disproportionate cost to Medicaid; a review of a successful state and private sector partnership to improve services for the foster population through Medicaid managed care; and laws that promote the health of children and youth who are in or aging out of foster care, including the Affordable Care Act. The web site archives the agenda, speaker biographies, resources, and presentations.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Foster care, Foster children, Health care delivery, Medicaid managed care

Overton GW, ed. 2012. Guidebook for directors of nonprofit corporations. (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: American Bar Association, 350 pp.

Annotation: This reference book is for directors and prospective directors of nonprofit corporations, from the smallest corporation that operates principally at a local or even neighborhood level, to the largest nonprofit corporation having operations that extend not only across the United States but internationally as well. Primarily written for the lay reader, it provides a description of general legal principles as they apply to nonprofit corporations and offers useful and practical suggestions and checklists. This book, written and edited by leading lawyers in the nonprofit industry, will assist directors of nonprofit corporations in performing their duties and providing an overall understanding of their role to the corporations they serve. Despite their variety of purposes, nonprofit corporations have many things in common. Although the size of the resources managed by nonprofit boards varies widely, their fundamental responsibilities are the same. This guidebook aims to help directors of all nonprofit corporations, big and small, to use their resources to the greatest effect.

Contact: American Bar Association, 321 North Clark Street, Chicago, IL 60610, Telephone: (800) 285-2221 Secondary Telephone: (312) 988-5000 E-mail: askaba@abanet.org Web Site: http://www.abanet.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Ethics, Leadership training, Nonprofit organizations

American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law. 2011. It's your life. Washington, DC: American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law,

Annotation: This website is geared toward helping adolescents in foster care who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) navigate the child welfare system. The site provides information about harassment, discrimination, and violence; homelessness and running away; health and sexuality; and state-specific resources. A 24-hour hotline is included. The site also adresses common questions, presents stories about LGBTQ adolescents, discusses life after foster care, and provides other related information.

Contact: American Bar Association, Center on Children and the Law, 740 15th Street, N.W., , Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 662-1000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 285-2221 Fax: (202) 662-1755 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.abanet.org/child Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Child welfare agencies, Children's rights, Discrimination, Foster care, Homelessness, Homosexuality, Runaways, Sexual harassment, Violence

American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law. 2009. Court-involved children. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau,

Annotation: This webcast, which was conducted on April 15, 2009, focuses on the importance of attachment to a child's well-being and mental health. The speaker discusses toxic stress and trauma and understanding the impact on young children's development and mental health. The webcast can be viewed in various formats, including video + slides + captioning, presentation slides, transcript (html or pdf), or audio only. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Multimedia, Attachment behavior, Audiovisual materials, Child health, Childhood development, Early childhood development, Mental health, Parent child relations, Relationships, Stress

Klain E, Pilnik L, Talati E, Maze CL, Diamond-Berry K, Hudson L. 2009. Healthy beginnings, healthy futures: A judge's guide. Washington, DC: American Bar Association, ABA Center on Children and the Law, 150 pp.

Annotation: This guide addresses the array of health needs of very young children in the child welfare system. The guide provides research-based tools and strategies to help judges promote better outcomes for infants and young children who enter their courtrooms. Topics include (1) meeting the needs of very young children in dependency court, (2) promoting physical health, (3) addressing early mental health and developmental needs, (4) achieving permanency, and (5) improving the court's response. Practice tips related to each of these topics are offered, as well. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Bar Association, Center on Children and the Law, 740 15th Street, N.W., , Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 662-1000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 285-2221 Fax: (202) 662-1755 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.abanet.org/child Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-60442-611-3.

Keywords: Child health, Child welfare agencies, Courts, Early childhood development, Health promotion, Infant, Infant development, Mental health, Research, Young children

American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, National Business Group on Health, American Academy of Pediatrics, and National Institute for Health Care Management. 2009. Medical homes for children. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau,

Annotation: This webcast, which was conducted on April 21, 2009, highlights the importance of how children uniquely benefit from the medical home, shares current efforts to implement the medical home across multiple stakeholder groups, and seeks to spur future collaborative efforts in support of the medical home. The webcast can be viewed in various formats, including video + slides + captioning, presentation slides, transcript (html or pdf), or audio only. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Multimedia, Chid health, Collaboration, Medical home, Primary care, World wide web

Hudson L, Klain E, Smariga M, Youcha V. 2007. Healing the youngest children: Model court-community partnerships. Washington, DC: American Bar Association, ABA Center on Children and the Law and Zero to Three Policy Center, 30 pp. (Practice and policy brief: Baby briefs)

Annotation: This paper describes and furnishes sample cases of four model court-community partnerships that exhibit improved outcomes in providing for the developmental needs of very young children in the welfare system and their families. Dynamic factors of these programs include: systems change, which defines the roles of judges, service providers, lawyers, and the community; focus on services for very young children; procedural enhancements; and sustainability efforts. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Bar Association, Center on Children and the Law, 740 15th Street, N.W., , Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 662-1000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 285-2221 Fax: (202) 662-1755 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.abanet.org/child Available from the website.

Keywords: Child protective services, Child welfare agencies, Children with special health care needs, Community programs, Courts, Foster care, Foster children, Infants, Maltreated children, Model programs, Toddlers, Welfare services

Smariga M. 2007. Visitation with infants and toddlers in foster care: What judges and attorneys need to know. Washington, DC: American Bar Association, ABA Center on Children and the Law and Zero to Three Policy Center, 26 pp. (Practice and policy brief)

Annotation: This paper summarizes the role of attachment and the effects of separation on very young children, explains why face-to-face parent-child visitation is important for very young children, emphasizes the role of visitation in permanency planning, highlights key elements of successful visitation plans for infants and toddlers, suggests strategies for addressing barriers to visitation, reviews the judge's role in supporting parent-child visits, and shares community approaches to visitation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Bar Association, Center on Children and the Law, 740 15th Street, N.W., , Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 662-1000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 285-2221 Fax: (202) 662-1755 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.abanet.org/child Available from the website.

Keywords: Attachment behavior, Children with special health care needs, Courts, Emotional development, Foster care, Foster children, Health services, Infants, Toddlers

Howse KA and Partners in Program Planning for Adolescent Health. 2002. Health for teens in care: A judge's guide. Washington, DC: American Bar Association, Center on Children and the Law, 94 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to provide judges, attorneys, and social workers with information on adolescent development and the issues relevant to adolescent health for youth under court supervision (including foster care and the juvenile justice system). It discusses normal adolescent development and includes information regarding the challenges for adolescents under court supervision that may affect their development. Additional sections include standards of care on a variety of health topics; checklists for those who must assure that appropriate care is provided; and information on planning for the transition to emancipation and adult life. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Bar Association, Center on Children and the Law, 740 15th Street, N.W., , Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 662-1000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 285-2221 Fax: (202) 662-1755 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.abanet.org/child Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-59031-010-1.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Child welfare, Foster care, Juvenile justice, Planning

Kaplan SR. 1991. Child fatality legislation in the United States. Chicago, IL: American Bar Association, 281 pp.

Contact: American Bar Association, 321 North Clark Street, Chicago, IL 60610, Telephone: (800) 285-2221 Secondary Telephone: (312) 988-5000 E-mail: askaba@abanet.org Web Site: http://www.abanet.org $10.00.

American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law. 1990. Drug-exposed infants and their families: Coordinating responses of the legal, medical and child protection system. Washington, DC: American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, 141 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses critical child protection, medical, and legal issues that need to be resolved by those who work with drug-exposed infants and their families. It is intended for administrators who may develop policies in the child protection and health care fields, lawyers who practice in the area of child abuse and neglect, and legislators who are deliberating laws pertaining to these issues. The report suggests how professionals can work together to bring drug-using women into prenatal care, identify drug-exposed infants, and speed the infants toward family reunification and family drug treatment, or toward adoptive homes. Appendices include case briefs and examples of state policies, interagency agreements, and hospital policies.

Keywords: Child protective services, Child welfare, Drug affected infants, Perinatal addiction, Substance abuse

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.